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SPORTS
July 25, 2012 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
The clock continues to tick for the Nashville Predators, who must decide by 11:30 p.m. Wednesday whether to match the Flyers' 14-year, $110 million offer to restricted free-agent Shea Weber. "We have no clue what's going to happen," Kevin Epp, one of Weber's agents, said Monday night. "We're all in a state of limbo. " Epp believes that the size of Nashville's ownership group - 10 people - may be slowing the process. "There's a lot of owners who have to get together to make the decision," he said.
NEWS
July 7, 2012 | By Mike Schneider, Associated Press
ORLANDO, Fla. - Former neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman was released from jail Friday for a second time while he awaits trial on second-degree murder charges in the fatally shooting of Trayvon Martin. Zimmerman left the Seminole County Jail a day after Circuit Judge Kenneth Lester granted a $1 million bail with strict conditions. He ignored shouted questions from nearby reporters as he walked out and got into an SUV. The judge is requiring Zimmerman to stay in Seminole County.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After a five-day gathering that drew about 200 members of the national Occupy movement to Philadelphia, the protesters left town Thursday for a seven-day trek to New York City. Despite temperatures in the 90s forecast for the next four days in New Jersey, about 45 people signed up to walk the entire 99-mile route from the Liberty Bell to Wall Street, according to Daphne Carr, a graduate student from New York City who organized the march. About 100 people began the march Thursday morning.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Miriam Hill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Organizers of two groups that grew out of the Occupy movement kick off events in Philadelphia Saturday and are promising, peace, love, street protests, and fierce political debate. And, probably, camping. Only one of the groups has members that may camp. That would be the people who organized the Occupy Philly encampment last fall outside City Hall and are pulling together six days of activities they are calling the "National Gathering. " Dustin Slaughter, one of the representatives handling media questions for the National Gathering, said organizers don't know how many people will attend but believe it could be as many as 2,000.
SPORTS
May 31, 2012 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Ed Snider, founder of the Flyers, this offseason has a different feel from last year's. Even though the Flyers were eliminated in the second round of the Stanley Cup playoffs for the second consecutive season, Snider is much more optimistic about the team's direction. "To me, every year we want to win the Cup, so if we don't win the Cup, it's an unsuccessful year," Snider said in a phone interview Tuesday from his mansion in Santa Barbara, Calif., just before playing in a tennis match.
NEWS
May 21, 2012 | By Michael Smerconish
So Americans Elect wasn't a subterfuge for Michael Bloomberg, Colin Powell, or Jon Huntsman after all. Too bad. Americans have demonstrated their desire for an alternative to the status quo. That a large number of us seem open to the idea of voting for a presidential candidate who is not a Republican or Democrat would seem to be supported by voter-registration figures and polling data that document the rise of independents. According to USAToday, from 2008 until the end of 2011, Democratic registration was down in 25 of the 28 states that register voters by party, and Republican registrations were down in 21. Independent registrations were up in 18. In five Gallup surveys in 2012, an average of 42 percent of Americans have identified themselves as political independents (compared with an average of 29.4 percent identifying themselves as Democrat and 27.4 percent as Republican)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2012 | By Terri Akman, FOR THE INQUIRER
For the one year he attended public schools in Roxborough, learning was hard for Noah Cason. Today, as a fourth grader enrolled in Green Woods Charter School, Noah, 10, can't wait to get to class. "...We get to hike and go to the stream to test the water quality, and write about how we can protect the stream. We can actually experiment ourselves to learn about nature, which makes school fun. " Noah doesn't know it, but he's reaping the rewards of the No Child Left Inside movement, a push to increase children's access to outside play that gained momentum when Richard Louv's book, Last Child in the Woods, was published in 2005.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
If the Curtis Institute is about achieving greatness in various forms, an essential part of that would have to be experiencing the pitfalls that are everywhere in the symphonic repertoire. Nothing dire happened when the Curtis Symphony Orchestra played Jennifer Higdon, Brahms, and Bartok under Robert Spano Monday at the Kimmel Center; the showcase element of the concert was delivered with swaggering confidence. But that doesn't mean any given masterpiece's DNA was located. The Bartok Concerto for Orchestra was most distinctive: Rather than running the movements together as so many conductors do, Spano treated them as discrete entities in ways that reminded you of the music's strangeness, how movements start in mid-thought and end in ways suggesting that there's plenty left to say. Spano pursued a great variety of string sounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
By turning toward conducting, Joshua Bell appears to have become a born-again violinist. His arrival as music director of the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields on Monday at the Kimmel Center might have suggested that he's moving away from the repertoire and art on which he made his name — as so many have before him. Paradoxically, however, the opposite has happened. Though Bell has long been one of the most consistent of A-list violinists, recent Philadelphia Orchestra concerto appearances suggested that he had grown a bit comfortable, his playing lacking immediacy aside from his self-authored cadenzas.
NEWS
April 8, 2012 | By Brian Schaefer, For The Inquirer
TEL AVIV - After coughing regularly for half an hour, Rennie Harris, artistic director/choreographer of Philadelphia-based hip-hop company Rennie Harris Puremovement, paused a hotel-lobby interview last month to order a cup of tea. "It's sandstorm season in Cairo, or something," he apologized. Harris had just finished the first leg of his company's frenetic March 9-to-April 6 DanceMotion USA tour of Egypt, Israel, and the Palestinian territories, during which he and his dynamic dancers taught, performed, loved the food, loved the people, and spread the hip-hop gospel: Be young, be free.
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