CollectionsMovie Palace
IN THE NEWS

Movie Palace

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 28, 2003 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dan Munyon never dreamed of being in the movies. He wanted an old-fashioned palace to showcase them. But four years after he bought the 1920s-vintage Broadway Theater with its gilt carpet and towering chandeliers, that dream is in danger of slipping through his fingers. Munyon filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy last week, two hours before the Gloucester County sheriff was set to auction off the historic theater in the heart of downtown Pitman. The bank is demanding full payment of his $40,000 loan, and creditors from movie companies and the Internal Revenue Service have come calling.
NEWS
September 26, 2005 | By Adam Fifield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a dizzying reversal of fortune. In July, Dan Munyon conceded it was unlikely he would ever own or operate Pitman's historic Broadway Theatre again. "It's way out of reach for me," he said in the midst of a tumultuous bankruptcy proceeding. This month, Munyon - a grandson of vaudeville performers who had dreamed of running an old-time movie palace since he was 8 - got a second chance. More than $15,000 in community donations helped him make a down payment and pay legal fees, and on Sept.
NEWS
September 30, 1993 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Standing amid plasterboard and electrical wiring, Walter Strine Sr. strung crystals beads onto an ornate chandelier at what will soon be the Media Theatre for the Performing Arts. His shock of white hair bobbed as he carefully threaded the decorative light fixture. "I have to get it finished because we're having auditions here over the weekend," he said cheerily. Strine, a successful entrepreneur now in his mid-80s, has owned the old movie palace for 20 years and is the force behind the effort to transform it into a performing arts center.
NEWS
January 12, 1992 | By Kathi Kauffman, Special to The Inquirer
Back around World War I, everyone went to the movies, said Calvin Pryluck, a professor of radio-television-film at Temple University. They would not go to see any specific movie or actor, he said; rather, it was just a habit, the way television is today. Friday nights were for high school students, Saturday was date night for high school and college-age couples, and Sunday was family night. And it was never just the movie, added Pryluck. People would go out for a shake before or a soda after.
NEWS
September 30, 1993 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Standing amid plasterboard and electrical wiring, Walter Strine Sr. strung crystals beads onto an ornate chandelier at what will soon be the Media Theatre for the Performing Arts. His shock of white hair bobbed as he carefully threaded the decorative light fixture. "I have to get it finished because we're having auditions here over the weekend," he said cheerily. Strine, a successful entrepreneur now in his mid-80s, has owned the old movie palace for 20 years and is the force behind its transformation into a performing arts center.
NEWS
May 5, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
United Artists, owner of the Sameric 4, has signed an agreement of sale that will close the city's last surviving movie palace. "It's almost a done deal," said Bill Quigley, senior vice president of marketing and new business for UA, the Denver-based theater chain. Philadelphia real estate investors Neil Rodin and Ralph Heller confirmed yesterday that they were "in the midst of purchasing" the four-plex at 1908 Chestnut St. The plan, said Rodin, is to convert the Sameric into an "exciting" retail space.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writers
Demolition began Saturday on the historic Boyd Theater, with wrecking crews tearing down the part of the L-shaped building that lines Sansom Street. "The theater was a precious resource that can't really be replaced," said harpist and composer Saul Davis, who lives across Chestnut Street from the front of the theater. Davis, who led early fights to save the theater from demolition, said he retreated to his bedroom to avoid the upsetting sounds of the building being torn down.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Workman were seen moving heavy machinery into the Boyd Theater's auditorium Monday morning, leading Philadelphia preservationists to conclude that its owner, Live Nation, has begun demolition of Center City's last art deco movie palace. The Preservation Alliance's advocacy director, Ben Leech, said he could clearly hear hammering sounds when he walked past the theater's Sansom Street exit doors. "I can't think of what else they'd be doing other than demolition," he said. He noted that a demolition permit was posted on the theater's Chestnut Street facade this weekend.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
PHILADELPHIA Fearful that demolition is already underway at the historic Boyd Theater, officials at the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia said they would seek a court order Tuesday to stop the owner from proceeding with plans leading to a new multiplex. Workmen were seen moving heavy machinery into the Boyd's ornate auditorium on Monday morning, leading preservationists to conclude that the theater's owner, Live Nation, had begun gutting Center City's last art deco movie palace, said Caroline E. Boyce, the alliance's director.
NEWS
June 17, 2002
ACCORDING TO the owners of the Sameric theater, everyone can relax. They are not planning on tearing down the famed movie palace. "That's not our inclination," said Leslie Smallwood, spokesman for the Goldenberg Group. So maybe this means that the well-intentioned Committee to Save the Sameric/Boyd can stand down. At least for now. But the rest of us should be ready to man the barricades, because even though the Goldenberg Group says it won't tear the Sameric down, what it does want to do is even worse.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2016 | By Alexandra Villarreal, Staff Writer
'Before people had home entertainment, the stand-alone theater was the living room of the community," said Philip Jablon. He set down a chest of drawers before stealing away for a moment to chat about his true passion, photography. Jablon is based in Thailand, touring Southeast Asia to capture images of deteriorating or demolished movie houses. On the rare day he's Stateside, he works as a mover (a job he has held since he was 19) for the cash that finances his project abroad. Twenty of his photos will be on display Wednesday through Aug. 25 at the Philadelphia Mausoleum of Contemporary Art, the first large-scale exhibit of his work in his hometown.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
This has been a heartbreaking year for Philadelphia's historic cultural venues. Chestnut Street's Boyd Theater, the glittering survivor of Hollywood's golden age, is being hacked apart and turned into a development site. Developers have been granted permission by the Nutter administration to do the same to South Street's Royal Theater and Broad Street's Blue Horizon, as long as they retain the facades as two-dimensional tokens of their former glory. That makes it all the more amazing that one important member of this grand theater crew has managed to escape the wrecking ball: the Uptown Theater.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writers
Demolition began Saturday on the historic Boyd Theater, with wrecking crews tearing down the part of the L-shaped building that lines Sansom Street. "The theater was a precious resource that can't really be replaced," said harpist and composer Saul Davis, who lives across Chestnut Street from the front of the theater. Davis, who led early fights to save the theater from demolition, said he retreated to his bedroom to avoid the upsetting sounds of the building being torn down.
NEWS
April 5, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Disappointed and vowing to pursue stronger historic preservation protections, advocates for the Boyd Theater said Thursday that they would drop all plans to appeal a March ruling allowing the demolition of the interior of Center City's only remaining movie palace. Preservationist Howard Haas said he and others feared their efforts would grind too slowly through the system while crews continued to dismantle the Boyd's cherished art-deco auditorium, leaving them battling, potentially, over the fate of "four walls" at 1910 Chestnut St. Demolition began just days after the Historical Commission gave its approval on March 14. In the settlement finalized Thursday, Haas' Friends of the Boyd joined with the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia in dropping court and administrative challenges against building owner Live Nation, developer Neal Rodin, and iPic Entertainment, the movie chain that plans to convert the site of the 1928 theater into a high-end multiplex.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
PHILADELPHIA Fearful that demolition is already underway at the historic Boyd Theater, officials at the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia said they would seek a court order Tuesday to stop the owner from proceeding with plans leading to a new multiplex. Workmen were seen moving heavy machinery into the Boyd's ornate auditorium on Monday morning, leading preservationists to conclude that the theater's owner, Live Nation, had begun gutting Center City's last art deco movie palace, said Caroline E. Boyce, the alliance's director.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Workman were seen moving heavy machinery into the Boyd Theater's auditorium Monday morning, leading Philadelphia preservationists to conclude that its owner, Live Nation, has begun demolition of Center City's last art deco movie palace. The Preservation Alliance's advocacy director, Ben Leech, said he could clearly hear hammering sounds when he walked past the theater's Sansom Street exit doors. "I can't think of what else they'd be doing other than demolition," he said. He noted that a demolition permit was posted on the theater's Chestnut Street facade this weekend.
NEWS
March 1, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
A Philadelphia Historical Commission panel granted preliminary approval Thursday to a Florida entertainment company to demolish the Boyd Theater's lavish art-deco interior, despite an anonymous donor's last-minute offer to save the city's only surviving relic of Hollywood's golden age. In reaching its decision, the Committee on Financial Hardship concluded that the large movie house could not be redeveloped at a reasonable cost, and that the purchase...
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The fate of the historic Boyd Theater, Center City's imperiled onetime movie palace, remained in limbo Tuesday after a Philadelphia Historical Commission panel postponed taking a position on whether to recommend its demolition for redevelopment. The committee on financial hardship, whose recommendation must be issued before a final decision is made, heard from supporters and detractors before promising to continue the proceedings before the full commission meets to vote on Feb. 14. The move ended four hours of testimony that began with a lengthy 9 a.m. presentation by Matthew McClure, lawyer for owner Live Nation and the cinema concern iPic-Gold Class Entertainment, arguing that demolition of a large portion of the theater was an economically feasible option where few others existed.
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Watching a movie at an iPic theater, an executive for the Boca Raton, Fla., company assures, is a "stress-free" experience. Reclining seats. Blankets and pillows, too. A buzzer on your armrest to call the waitstaff. Sliders or flatbread sandwiches delivered to your seat. And, after a show, dinner or drinks in the lobby. "We want the lobby to feel like a five-star hotel rather than a theater," said Paul Safran, general counsel for iPic-Gold Class Entertainment. But the company's plan for one Center City movie house is becoming anything but stress-free.
NEWS
February 26, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
The Academy Awards ceremony is, by nature, a rite of self-congratulation and self-love - the movie industry showers plaudits and prizes on itself for the work of the last year, but also for achievements of a lifetime. Venerable stars and filmmakers are honored for the length and breadth of their careers, vintage clips are spliced into thematic reels, the actors, screenwriters, shooters, costumers, composers, and directors who passed away in the preceding 12 months are remembered.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|