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Mozzarella

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NEWS
September 25, 2003 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a lot of mozzarella. More than 600 tons, in fact, worth more than $1.5 million wholesale, say its producers. It was delivered from California in a series of shipments in May and June to a local distributor based in Marlton. But that is about all that Valley Gold, the manufacturer, and Joseph Profaci, the recipient, agree on. Lawyers for both sides spent more than two hours in U.S. District Court in Camden yesterday churning the issues in a breach-of-contract/fraud case based on a civil complaint filed last month by Valley Gold.
FOOD
August 26, 2010
Cows have long ruled the mozzarella consciousness of most Americans who've embraced a good Caprese salad. But Italian water buffalo are the beasts we should really celebrate in that ode to fresh cheese and ripe tomatoes. Water buffalo ( not the same as American bison) were the original source of Campania's famed mozzarella, dating from the second century A.D., and I still find their cheese superior to even good renditions of cow's-milk mozzarella. The catch is the higher cost and lack of consistency in this delicate imported cheese, which has a tangy savor and a softer center that demands careful handling.
FOOD
July 5, 2013
Mix-master mozzarella Fresh-made mozzarella has become common in its many variations, from simple balls to prosciutto roll-ups and cream-stuffed burratas. But Vietnamese-flavored mozzarella? This wacky but wonderful invention, tinted pink with sriracha and rich with sesame oil, is courtesy of Mike Hauke of Tony Boloney's in Atlantic City. He's stretched the craft into unconventional new-flavor territory by infusing his homemade curds (a base ingredient many local makers buy) with everything from truffles to chipotles and this Asian inspiration.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2001 | By RACHEL ROGALA For the Daily News
Jack and David Cunicelli, co-owners of 320 Produce Market and Deli in Swarthmore, always enjoyed the Caprese salad that their mom used to make for them when they were kids. Originating on the island of Capri, this salad of tomatoes, mozzarella and basil is an easy summertime meal - made even better in these parts when Jersey tomatoes are in season. But when it came time to create a sandwich menu for their business, Jack made a slight mistake. He had the region of Calabria, Italy, not Capri, on his mind, so he named the sandwich the Calabrese.
FOOD
June 27, 2001 | By RACHEL ROGALA For the Daily News
Don't be fooled by the dainty Art Nouveau interior at RoseLena's, 1623 E. Passyunk Ave. Owners Terry and Al Masino and their son and executive chef, Chris, serve one he-man of a sandwich in their rendition of the French Quarter favorite, the muffuletta. RoseLena's muffuletta is filled with mortadella, Genoa salami, prosciutto, mozzarella, provolone and, of course, the all-important olive spread. They get their French boules from Carangi's Italian Bakery. Terry Masino admits this sandwich may be considered an artery clogger, but only if one overdoes it. As her mother (RoseLena's namesake)
NEWS
April 12, 2012 | By Joe Gray, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
A good macaroni and cheese takes time. At least one that doesn't come out of a box. That's why, when leafing through the new cookbook Home at 7, Dinner at 8 (Kyle, $19.95), by Sophie Wright, the British chef's mac 'n' cheese caught my eye. She shortens cooking time by skipping the sauce, but keeps the result homogeneous and creamy by using Boursin and cream cheese. Creamy Macaroni and Cheese Makes 6 servings 1 pound penne pasta 5 ounces Boursin cheese 3 tablespoons cream cheese 9 ounces grated mozzarella cheese or fresh mozzarella 6 ounces fresh baby spinach 1/4 to 1/2 cup breadcrumbs 1/4 to 1/2 cup grated Parmesan   1. Cook the pasta in a large pot of well-salted boiling water over high heat until al dente, about 9 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012 | Maureen Fitzgerald
1 tablespoon olive oil ½ teaspoon each, chopped: fresh rosemary, thyme, and parsley Salt and freshly ground black pepper 4 (3 ounces each) chicken cutlets ¾ cup marinara sauce ¼ cup shredded mozzarella Fresh basil, for garnish 1. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. 2. Stir the oil and herbs in a small bowl to blend. Season with salt and pepper. Brush both sides of the cutlets with the herb oil. Heat a heavy, large ovenproof skillet over high heat. Add the cutlets and cook just until brown, about 2 minutes per side.
FOOD
July 15, 1987 | By SONJA HEINZE, Special to the Daily News
Q. I bought a loaf of whole-wheat bread, and when I cut a sandwich in half, I saw a bug. So I bought a different brand the next time and pulled a few pieces apart and found another bug. I quit buying whole-wheat bread, even though it's better for you than white. Now, I don't know if I'm just having bad luck, but when I unrolled my paper towels, I saw three or four insects. Is it possible for companies to control the bugs found in products? It's made me so paranoid, I inspect everything I buy now. Beth Brown Davenport, Iowa A. If I found bugs in three different products, I wouldn't call it bad luck.
NEWS
January 20, 1999 | by Beth D'Addono, For the Daily News
Tarantella, according to Webster's, is "a lively folk dance of Southern Italy in six-eight time. " But in South Jersey, Tarantella also means "a lively, Italian restaurant with authentic Italian food served in portions large enough to feed a small village. " Tarantella opened on Route 70 in Medford about 18 months ago. The funny thing about it was that Sal Coppola, the friendly guy who greets everybody so warmly when they come in the door, didn't even know he was opening the restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013
THIS IS Carol Purfield's easy way to feed a crowd. She often serves this with homemade brioche rolls, but any kind of good "sopping" bread will do. She also saves the leftover stock to make black-bean soup later in the week. PULLED PORK IN A CROCK-POT 1 pork shoulder (8 to 12 pounds) 7 garlic cloves Dry rub mix: 2 tablespoons each of chili powder, salt, sugar, pepper, garlic powder 2 large onions, sliced 1/2 cup cider vinegar 1/4 cup water Large dash Worcestershire sauce 1 bottle of your favorite barbecue sauce Salt and pepper to taste Make slits all over the pork shoulder; insert garlic cloves.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
July 5, 2013
Mix-master mozzarella Fresh-made mozzarella has become common in its many variations, from simple balls to prosciutto roll-ups and cream-stuffed burratas. But Vietnamese-flavored mozzarella? This wacky but wonderful invention, tinted pink with sriracha and rich with sesame oil, is courtesy of Mike Hauke of Tony Boloney's in Atlantic City. He's stretched the craft into unconventional new-flavor territory by infusing his homemade curds (a base ingredient many local makers buy) with everything from truffles to chipotles and this Asian inspiration.
FOOD
July 5, 2013
Some pizza places rise on their delicate crust or imported wood-fired ovens. Atlantic City's irrepressible Tony Boloney's is all about the toppings - usually offbeat ones - built on a variety of homemade cheeses and some unexpected international inspirations. Classic tastes should be well-sated by the Old Man Brooklyn, with clouds of hand-pulled mozzarella floating across slow-roasted tomato sauce. But I found the globe-trotting pies to be most exciting, like the Mexican Corn Husker topped with Mexican-style string cheese, roasted Jersey corn, and cilantro-tinted poblano cream.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2013 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Mike Hauke, the irrepressible owner of Atlantic City's Tony Boloney, seems to be everywhere. One moment he's behind the counter serving off-the-wall pizzas topped with homemade Mexican string cheese and corn, the next he's selling flatbreads and hand-pulled mozzarella at the Margate farmer's market from his Tony's Farm truck. He's been on national TV, too, most recently Live With Kelly and Michael . We got AC's dough-slinging dynamo to pause, for just a moment, to share some deep thoughts from Tony Boloney Land.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013
THIS IS Carol Purfield's easy way to feed a crowd. She often serves this with homemade brioche rolls, but any kind of good "sopping" bread will do. She also saves the leftover stock to make black-bean soup later in the week. PULLED PORK IN A CROCK-POT 1 pork shoulder (8 to 12 pounds) 7 garlic cloves Dry rub mix: 2 tablespoons each of chili powder, salt, sugar, pepper, garlic powder 2 large onions, sliced 1/2 cup cider vinegar 1/4 cup water Large dash Worcestershire sauce 1 bottle of your favorite barbecue sauce Salt and pepper to taste Make slits all over the pork shoulder; insert garlic cloves.
FOOD
January 31, 2013 | Craig LaBan
Valley Shepherd Creamery's recent arrival in the Reading Terminal Market is cause for celebration for lovers of the Central Jersey farm's cave-aged sheep and cow's milk cheeses (Valley Thunder, Crema de Blue), not to mention the indulgent grilled cheeses from its Meltkraft sandwich counter. But the greatest reason to visit so far is the fresh mozzarella cheesemaker Jamie Png crafts twice daily. Made from shredded curds that are melted, pulled and braided, it's a revelation to anyone who's only tasted bouncy store-bought mozza.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012 | Maureen Fitzgerald
1 tablespoon olive oil ½ teaspoon each, chopped: fresh rosemary, thyme, and parsley Salt and freshly ground black pepper 4 (3 ounces each) chicken cutlets ¾ cup marinara sauce ¼ cup shredded mozzarella Fresh basil, for garnish 1. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. 2. Stir the oil and herbs in a small bowl to blend. Season with salt and pepper. Brush both sides of the cutlets with the herb oil. Heat a heavy, large ovenproof skillet over high heat. Add the cutlets and cook just until brown, about 2 minutes per side.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | Michael Klein
Peter McAndrews — yes, he's all Irish — married a second-generation Italian American woman, Lisa DiPaolo, and they honeymooned in Italy. After one bite of the food, "I didn't want to come back to America," he said. He ended up training for six months in Piedmont and six months in his wife's ancestral hometown of Molise. McAndrews, who spent a dozen years as chef at the American bar Rembrandt's in Fairmount, has opened a string of Italian concepts in Northern Liberties and the Italian Market, starting in April 2007 with Modo Mio in Northern Liberties, followed by two Paesano's sandwich shops, Monsu, and Popolino.
NEWS
April 12, 2012 | By Joe Gray, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
A good macaroni and cheese takes time. At least one that doesn't come out of a box. That's why, when leafing through the new cookbook Home at 7, Dinner at 8 (Kyle, $19.95), by Sophie Wright, the British chef's mac 'n' cheese caught my eye. She shortens cooking time by skipping the sauce, but keeps the result homogeneous and creamy by using Boursin and cream cheese. Creamy Macaroni and Cheese Makes 6 servings 1 pound penne pasta 5 ounces Boursin cheese 3 tablespoons cream cheese 9 ounces grated mozzarella cheese or fresh mozzarella 6 ounces fresh baby spinach 1/4 to 1/2 cup breadcrumbs 1/4 to 1/2 cup grated Parmesan   1. Cook the pasta in a large pot of well-salted boiling water over high heat until al dente, about 9 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
It was pizza-palooza in Philadelphia 2010, as kitchens from Headhouse Square to South Jersey and Ambler let the gourmet pizzas fly. Stephen Starr launched the 'za-fest with Stella, but was quickly followed into the promised land of artisan pies by Zavino, Dettera, Treno, City Tap House, Radice, Barbuzzo, and even the Garces Trading Co. With effects of the recession still lingering, the pizza players all aimed to feed the public's insatiable hunger...
FOOD
August 26, 2010
Cows have long ruled the mozzarella consciousness of most Americans who've embraced a good Caprese salad. But Italian water buffalo are the beasts we should really celebrate in that ode to fresh cheese and ripe tomatoes. Water buffalo ( not the same as American bison) were the original source of Campania's famed mozzarella, dating from the second century A.D., and I still find their cheese superior to even good renditions of cow's-milk mozzarella. The catch is the higher cost and lack of consistency in this delicate imported cheese, which has a tangy savor and a softer center that demands careful handling.
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