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NEWS
June 9, 1999 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A week after calling for an investigation of Hollywood's marketing of violence, President Clinton yesterday won a pledge from thousands of theater owners to card young patrons seeking admission to R-rated movies when unaccompanied by an adult. The National Association of Theater Owners, whose members account for about 65 percent of the nation's movie screens, said it would now require ticket-buyers to provide photo identification proving that they were 17 or older. Those with adults would not be asked for age verification, though it was unclear yesterday whether the adult would have to accompany the minor into the screening room.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2012 | Steven Rea
Bully Never mind the hoo-ha over the MPAA ratings, that's beside the point. The point is that bullying isn't being addressed adequately by teachers, administrators or parents, and the kids profiled in this powerful documentary clearly suffer for it. A compelling piece of advocacy filmmaking, with heartbreaking stories, and real-life heroes, too. PG-13 The Deep Blue Sea Shot in a gauze of melancholy, Terence Davies' crushing adaptation of the...
LIVING
August 23, 1987 | By Richard Zacks, Special to The Inquirer
Working Girls, a frank, independent film, provides a kind of two-way-mirror peek into a high-ticket Manhattan brothel. While following a novice prostitute, the camera brings viewers right to the edge of certain sexual acts, and there is little doubt as to what is occurring. X-rated? No. Working Girls (1987, Charter, $79.95), which hits video stores this week, is going out unrated. So is Betty Blue (1986, CBS/Fox, $79.98), an Academy Award-nominated French film about a pouty-lipped young woman whose passion liberates a timid writer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1998 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
A strong first film tops this week's list of new movies on video. Twentyfourseven (1998) (Universal) 97 minutes. Bob Hoskins, Danny Nussbaum, James Hooton, Darren O. Campbell. Hoskins stars as a hardscrabble optimist who seeks to bring meaning to the lives of a group of disaffected British youths by having them put on gloves and knock each other in the gut and head. Shot in a high-contrast black-and-white that underscores the bleakness of a burnt-out British boomtown, writer-director Shane Meadows' feature debut is an unsparing drama about hope promised and hope lost.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1996 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Two flashy foreign films top this week's list of new movies on home video. Les Miserables (1995) (Warner) 175 minutes. Jean-Paul Belmondo, Michel Boujenah. An imaginative and resourceful reworking of Hugo's great novel that connects the sufferings of his protagonist Jean Valjean to a kindred spirit of our own age. In French with English subtitles. R (violence). Videodisc available. Frankie Starlight (1995) (New Line) 100 minutes. Anne Parillaud, Matt Dillon, Gabriel Byrne.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1998 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
A Southern tale that recalls a classic tops this week's list of new movies on video. Eve's Bayou (1997) (Trimark) $105.99. 109 minutes. Samuel L. Jackson, Lynn Whitfield, Debbi Morgan, Diahann Carroll. A magical and tragic story, set in backwater Louisiana circa 1963 and as resonant as To Kill a Mockingbird, about a girl who solves a family crisis with violence. Stars Jackson and is the debut of writer/director Kasi Lemmons. R (sexual situations, profanity, violence. RECENT MOVIES The Brylcreem Boys (1996)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1996 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
A rough-and-tumble thriller that keeps you guessing tops this week's list of new movies on video. THE USUAL SUSPECTS . 1/2 (1995) (PolyGram) $96.99. 106 minutes. Gabriel Byrne, Kevin Spacey, Chazz Palminteri. This twisting noir thriller is slick and smart and boasts a great ensemble cast - and an ending that will throw you. R (graphic violence, profanity). Available on videodisc. (CC) THE BIG GREEN . 1/2 (1995) (Disney) $19.98. 90 minutes. Steve Guttenberg, Olivia d'AboThis comedy for kids tells the small tale of impoverished Texas grade-schoolers who gain self-respect through soccer.
NEWS
May 2, 1999 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Ask me if I believe in freedom of speech, and I say yes. Ask me if I believe that our 14-year-old should be allowed to check out the R-rated video L.A. Confidential from the Free Library of Philadelphia, and I say no. Is this hypocritical? After all, she can check out the James Ellroy novel or walk into any bookstore in the country and buy it with her baby-sitting money. That I don't have a problem with. I do have a problem with the library's policy on videos. Reading a book about violence, corruption and sexual pathology is one thing; seeing a movie that graphically shows mad-dog cops, police officers who frame innocent citizens, and sadists swatting women around is quite another.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1999 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
An eloquent return to form for the Disney animation studio tops this week's list. Mulan (1998) (Buena Vista) $26.99. 88 minutes. Voices by Ming-Na Wen, Lea Salonga, Eddie Murphy, B.D. Wong, Donny Osmond, Harvey Fierstein, Gedde Watanabe, Miguel Ferrer, Pat Morita. Disney animation returns to top form with a triumphant, gorgeous work that speaks to children with rare eloquence about identity and coming of age. G. (CC) Shooting Fish (1998) (Fox) 93 minutes. Dan Futterman, Stuart Townsend, Kate Beckinsale.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1997 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
One of the summer's major blockbusters tops a quiet week in new home video releases. The Lost World: Jurassic Park 1/2 (1997) (Universal) $22.98. 129 minutes. Jeff Goldblum, Julianne Moore, Pete Postlethwaite, Richard Attenborough. A cautionary tale as colossal, scaly and predatory as a T. rex, The Lost World is a B-minus monster movie with A-plus production values. Except for the witty Goldblum, director Steven Spielberg's film lacks the human scale and interaction that made Jaws and E.T. as special for their stories as for their special effects.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2012 | Steven Rea
Bully Never mind the hoo-ha over the MPAA ratings, that's beside the point. The point is that bullying isn't being addressed adequately by teachers, administrators or parents, and the kids profiled in this powerful documentary clearly suffer for it. A compelling piece of advocacy filmmaking, with heartbreaking stories, and real-life heroes, too. PG-13 The Deep Blue Sea Shot in a gauze of melancholy, Terence Davies' crushing adaptation of the...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2010 | By ALEX BEN BLOCK, The Hollywood Reporter
Despite protests by its producer, director and distributor that "The Tillman Story" is an important documentary that should be available to young people, it has lost an appeal to have the Motion Picture Association of America change its R rating to PG-13. Producer John Battsek and director Amir Bar Lev made a personal appeal Thursday in Los Angeles before the appeals board, which is composed of studio distribution and major exhibition executives, but could not persuade them to change the rating.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1999 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
A celebration of sensuous dance tops this week's list of new movies on video. Tango . (1998, Columbia TriStar) 115 minutes. Miguel Angel Sola, Cecilia Narova, Mia Maestro, Juan Carlos Copes, Carlos Rivarola, Juan Luis Galiardo. Writer-director Carlos Saura's celebration of the sensuous dance offers a series of brushstrokes in lieu of a plot. But they are bold strokes, touching on themes of desire, loss, and Argentina's legacy of political repression. The fusion of striking choreography, sumptuous cinematography, beautiful men and women, dramatic staging, and soaring music makes for a pretty irresistible combination.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1999 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
An ode to obsessive love tops this week's list of new movies on video. Rushmore . . (1998) (Buena Vista) 93 minutes. Jason Schwartzman, Bill Murray, Olivia Williams. Wes Anderson's oddball ode to obsessive love follows a 15-year-old prep-schooler as he fails miserably in class and in life, yet perseveres with unfounded confidence. Newcomer Schwartzman is the hopelessly romantic hero. Murray offers a brilliant turn as a glum tycoon who becomes his friend and rival for the same woman.
NEWS
June 10, 1999 | By Rich Henson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Whether it's easy for teenagers under 17 to slip into movies rated R for explicit violence or sex depends on whom you ask. "We've been checking IDs for years," said Gary Haak, marketing coordinator for AMC Theaters in the Philadelphia area. "Any person who looks questionable, we'll card them. " Maybe not, said Alicia Kukawski, 17, a ticket counter cashier at the 24-screen Neshaminy AMC in Bensalem. Kukawski said yesterday that some cashiers - herself excluded, of course - have been known to let their underage friends buy tickets for restricted films.
NEWS
June 9, 1999 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A week after calling for an investigation of Hollywood's marketing of violence, President Clinton yesterday won a pledge from thousands of theater owners to card young patrons seeking admission to R-rated movies when unaccompanied by an adult. The National Association of Theater Owners, whose members account for about 65 percent of the nation's movie screens, said it would now require ticket-buyers to provide photo identification proving that they were 17 or older. Those with adults would not be asked for age verification, though it was unclear yesterday whether the adult would have to accompany the minor into the screening room.
NEWS
May 2, 1999 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Ask me if I believe in freedom of speech, and I say yes. Ask me if I believe that our 14-year-old should be allowed to check out the R-rated video L.A. Confidential from the Free Library of Philadelphia, and I say no. Is this hypocritical? After all, she can check out the James Ellroy novel or walk into any bookstore in the country and buy it with her baby-sitting money. That I don't have a problem with. I do have a problem with the library's policy on videos. Reading a book about violence, corruption and sexual pathology is one thing; seeing a movie that graphically shows mad-dog cops, police officers who frame innocent citizens, and sadists swatting women around is quite another.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1999 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
An eloquent return to form for the Disney animation studio tops this week's list. Mulan (1998) (Buena Vista) $26.99. 88 minutes. Voices by Ming-Na Wen, Lea Salonga, Eddie Murphy, B.D. Wong, Donny Osmond, Harvey Fierstein, Gedde Watanabe, Miguel Ferrer, Pat Morita. Disney animation returns to top form with a triumphant, gorgeous work that speaks to children with rare eloquence about identity and coming of age. G. (CC) Shooting Fish (1998) (Fox) 93 minutes. Dan Futterman, Stuart Townsend, Kate Beckinsale.
LIVING
November 26, 1998 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
After the turkey and pumpkin pie, a movie on video may be on your menu today. A raucous comedy and a tense drama are new in stores this week. Dr. Dolittle (1998) (Fox) $19.98. 85 minutes. Eddie Murphy, Ossie Davis, Oliver Platt, Peter Boyle. Director Betty Thomas' raucous and raunchy rethink of the Hugh Lofting stories about the physician who can communicate with animals. In a controlled performance that might be his funniest, Murphy is the man who talks to tigers, mutts and pigeons.
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