IN THE NEWS

Mud

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1989 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mud is not very nice stuff, and Mud is not a very nice play. It is playwright Maria Irene Fornes' contention that human beings are not very far removed in behavior from animals, specifically pigs and crabs, mud lovers both. The usual way for a playwright to demonstrate this not-very-novel idea is to place people in stressful situations and show the veneer of civilization dissolving as animal instincts take over. In Mud, which InterAct Theater Copany is presenting at the Annenberg Center, Fornes takes a much more basic approach.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Spring rains have dampened the spirits, and the feet, of users of Swarthmore's Thatcher Park. So much rain has fallen on the tot-lot playground, in fact, that Swarthmore Council members are asking borough residents for ideas on what to do about the two muddy footpaths at the park's entrances. The mud is an annoyance to people who want to use the park, borough officials said, and it gets tracked throughout the park, causing a cleanup problem. "We want to talk to anyone who has a brillant solution to the problem," said Councilman Robert Dawes during a work session Monday.
NEWS
July 24, 1988 | By Mary H. Donohue, Special to The Inquirer
Planning Commission members in Upper Uwchlan have paved the way for a solution to mud problems caused by new developments in the township. During a work session Thursday, the commissioners met with Chester County Planning Commission members Bob Smiley and Craig Kologie about a proposed ordinance change that would govern planning for new subdivisions. Smiley and Kologie presented a draft of their plan to the Planning Commission for feedback. For the last year, Smiley and Kologie have worked as consultants to the township to help Upper Uwchlan officials update the township's zoning ordinance.
NEWS
December 31, 1986 | By John Jennings and Jeff Brown, Inquirer Staff Writers
At first it looked like a good idea - a shortcut home in the gathering dusk. It nearly turned to tragedy yesterday when a 15-year-old Camden youth found himself trapped in the mud flats of Pennsauken Creek. Dozens of would-be rescuers lined the shore, vainly trying to pinpoint the cries of distress from the darkness. After an hour alone in the mud, David Rochon, of the 3200 block of Pelham Boulevard, was rescued, with the help of a Philadelphia television station's helicopter.
NEWS
March 1, 1987 | By Paul Duggan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mud covered Dennis Conway - so much mud that only his eyes and wide smile showed through it. "Oh, boy, I'll tell you, that's more work than it looks," he said, still catching his breath after five minutes of mud wrestling at the Brandywine firehouse in Coatesville. "It's harder to stay on your feet in there than it is to fight. I could hardly stand up in there!" This was last weekend, at a Feb. 21 fund-raising event for the volunteer Brandywine Fire Company and the Coatesville Area Jaycees.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1994 | By Jack E. Ewing, FOR THE INQUIRER
The floor of the Spectrum will turn from mud to ice to artificial turf this weekend. Dozens of monster trucks will roll tonight and Saturday over a muddy surface as they compete in the Ford U.S. Hot Rod Grand Slam Motorsports truck and tractor pull. The action will start tonight at 8 and will be followed by Saturday shows at 2 and 8 p.m. The floor will turn to ice Sunday for the National Hockey League when the Flyers play the Pittsburgh Penguins at 1:05 p.m. The Penguins are led by high- scoring wingers Jaromir Jagr, Kevin Stevens and Joe Mullen, defenseman Larry Murphy and Rick Tocchet, former Flyers' winger.
NEWS
August 5, 2004 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
You haven't experienced heavy until you've had the low end of Korn's nu-metal - a metallic rattle propelled by the slap technique of bassist Reginald "Fieldy" Arvizu - work its way from your ears into your diaphragm. And you haven't witnessed formulaic until you've seen Linkin Park perform a set of carbon-copy songs, such as "Numb" and "Crawling," that rarely deviate from the techno-laced intro + swelling pre-chorus + shout-along- refrain formula. Korn and Linkin Park were the headliners on the Projekt Revolution tour, a daylong, metal-leaning festival that played to a near-sellout crowd Tuesday at the Tweeter Center.
NEWS
July 9, 1987 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
All use of a state-owned lake in Cumberland County will be banned next week because of a growing risk posed by arsenic-laced mud that is being exposed as water from the lake is drained to permit repair of its crumbling dam, state officials announced yesterday. Jim Staples, a state environmental spokesman, said officials did not know yet whether they would lift the ban on use of Union Lake once the $15 million repair of the dam was completed in the spring of 1989. In the coming months, he said, the state will ponder that and study ways to remedy the lake's arsenic contamination.
NEWS
October 22, 1986
Campaign consultants from around the nation will be turning their attention to Pennsylvania in the coming weeks in search of answers to one of the most pressing political questions of our age: Can a candidate win high office campaigning against negative advertising? As anyone who resides within mud-slinging distance of a television set can attest, the 30-second smear - answered within hours by the 30-second countersmear - has become the prime means of communication in Campaign '86. In Pennsylvania as throughout the nation, candidates seem to be devoting most of their energy to denouncing each other's ads and raising money to carry forward with their own. The epidemic of negative television advertising - the phenomenon has been around for years, but never in such degree - has been blamed on the decline of the political parties, the rise of paid political consultants and the shortage of debatable issues.
NEWS
October 25, 1988 | By HENRY BRYAN
Talk about an R-rated campaign. This New Jersey barn burner between Democratic U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenburg and Republican challenger Pete Dawkins is wonderful. But Dawkins, a decorated Vietnam veteran no less, tried to wimp out last week. He suggested they both call off the dirty business in order to deal with serious issues in a dignified manner. No way. Dignity has no business in the politics of the Garden State, home of former state senator and convicted felon David "I'm really dead" Friedland, Gloucester County's own Kenny "The Incredible Hulk" Gewertz, and Jersey City's long dead Frank "I am the law" Hague.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2015 | Robert M. Kelley, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the Boy Scouts, they teach you to always be prepared. This time, I was not. We were in Crows Woods, a sprawling forest in Haddonfield with a network of dense marked trails (nice) and places you would not want to venture (mud, vines). The trouble started when Andrea, my wife, said, "It's a groundhog. " The nadir: When I was hip-high in mud, bleeding from thorn scratches. At the sighting of the groundhog, our dog, Cocoa Bear, vanished, but of course we knew where she went.
SPORTS
November 2, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
The guy who scored the winning touchdown nearly forgot the play. The guy who made the key first down picked up a ball that squirted through his quarterback's legs and rumbled through the mud for 2 yards. There was nothing elegant about Paulsboro's 6-0 victory over Woodbury on a rainy, windy, chilly Saturday afternoon. The Red Raiders didn't earn any style points. But the players who battled the elements as well as their archrivals in the quagmire on Paulsboro's grass field won't soon forget the experience.
NEWS
October 22, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
YOU SEE what happens? This is what happens when a state senator retires in the Philadelphia suburbs. The Delaware County-based 26th District has become a battlefield for one of the state's nastiest down-ballot races, with Republican Tom McGarrigle and Democrat John Kane seeking to replace outgoing Republican state Sen. Edwin "Ted" Erickson. Democrats have been eyeing the district since Erickson, an affable former biology professor, announced last year that he was not seeking re-election.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saltwater marshes along the Jersey Shore and Delaware Bay, like marshes everywhere, are in trouble. For many reasons, including sea-level rise, they're becoming less marshy and more watery. They're drowning. New Jersey, partnering with the Army Corps of Engineers and conservationists, has begun an $8.2 million pilot project that could not only restore the marshes, but also save money and solve other problems along the way. The new miracle method: Spray mud. In the Intracoastal Waterway behind Stone Harbor and Avalon, a dredge is sucking up sand and muck that has clogged the channel since Hurricane Sandy blew through.
NEWS
April 29, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
DELANCO A black-and-white aerial photograph of the banks of the Delaware River snapped in 1946 led a judge to conclude much of the "Dunes" area in this tiny community was once underwater and therefore belongs to the state of New Jersey, not the township. The recent ruling by Superior Court Judge Karen L. Suter paves the way for the state to pursue tentative plans to dump tons of dredge spoils on the land, which is now occupied by hiking trails and a small woods. Under state law, tidal waters and the land beneath them are owned by the state, and these claims can date back to the 1940s.
SPORTS
June 16, 2013 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
WITH THE four major sports teams not giving Philadelphia sports fans much to cheer for lately, there seemed to be a real need for someone to be the center of their affection during yesterday's U.S. Open play at Merion Golf Club. Of course, Tiger Woods draws the biggest crowds and the loudest cheers, but many, maybe most, are just watching out of curiosity, not for rooting purposes. Phil Mickelson probably has more people rooting for him than Woods, but it's too easy to cheer for him. Philly fans need an underdog.
SPORTS
June 13, 2013 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
The Daily News covers the Open: Check out PhillyDailyNews.com's U.S. Open page for our coverage of the tournament at Merion . THE RULE is called "lift, clean and place. " Some players call it "lift, clean and cheat. " It's something the PGA Tour regularly enacts with mud on a course, so players can feel a true ball flight. But in the history of the U.S. Open, the game's governing body is "fairly certain" it has never provided players with relief from muddied golf balls - and isn't likely to start this week at Merion Golf Club, no matter how much rain has fallen.
SPORTS
June 12, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sun came out, the rain stayed away, and players and fans alike enjoyed the second official practice day for the 113th U.S. Open at Merion Golf Club. But while Merion's East Course continued to drain and benefited from avoiding any rain, much less a deluge similar to what fell on two of the four days before Tuesday, players faced their own set of issues heading into Thursday's start of the national championship. One of the major concerns during practice Tuesday was the mud ball, something that happens frequently when a fairway dries out after rain but is still wet underneath.
NEWS
April 27, 2013 | By David Pitt, Associated Press
DES MOINES, Iowa - As spring rains soaked the central United States and helped conquer the historic drought, a new problem has sprouted: The fields have turned to mud. Farmers may be thankful the land is no longer parched, but it's too wet to plant in corn country and freezing temperatures and lingering snow have ruined the winter wheat crop. "Right now, we're wishing it would dry up so we can get in the field," said Iowa farmer Jerry Main, who plants corn and soybeans on about 500 acres in the southeast Iowa.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
JEFF NICHOLS might be the best American director whose work you don't know. The Arkansas filmmaker made the little-seen "Shotgun Stories," then "Take Shelter," the movie that should have given him a big-time profile but somehow didn't. Now Nichols has made "Mud," a movie that confirms his talent and has him again working expertly in the clay of his native South. It's a contemporary but very Twain-y coming-of-age story about two young, feral, river-dwelling teens whose summer project is aiding and abetting a fugitive (Matthew McConaughey)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|