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Muddy Waters

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1990 | By David Hinckley, New York Daily News
As important as Muddy Waters' music was in postwar America, relatively few people will soak up all his genius the first time through. The rewards for staying with it, however, are vast. "The Chess Box," a beautifully produced, well-annotated, six-album, three-CD box set (MCA), is as close as anyone will come to presenting a capsule history of Muddy Waters. It includes 72 tracks, from "Gypsy Woman" in 1947 through the early '70s. Along the way it picks up a few obscurities - the unreleased "Good Looking Woman" from 1948, plus some alternate takes - but mostly it sticks to the core of Waters' music, classic blues like "Rolling Stone," "I Just Want to Make Love to You," "Forty Days and Forty Nights," "Got My Mojo Workin," "She's Nineteen Years Old," "Mannish Boy" and "Hoochie Coochie Man. " Ironically, this is where the uninitiated may get confused.
SPORTS
October 18, 1990 | By Ray Didinger, Daily News Sports Writer
Welcome to another season of dirtysomething, the NFC East miniseries in which the Washington Redskins critique the Eagles' brand of football. In yesterday's installment, several Redskins discussed the Eagles' latest prime-time performance, a 32-24 win over the Minnesota Vikings. Specifically, the Redskins addressed safety Andre Waters's controversial knee shots on Minnesota quarterback Rich Gannon that are currently under review by NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue. "I thought it was outrageous," defensive tackle Tim Johnson said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1989 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
Muddy Waters had a face that was as majestic as the blues. It was defined by high cheekbones, a broad nose and eyes that always held a twinkle. His mouth, topped by a suave, meticulously groomed mustache, was small, except when he smiled, when it seemed big enough to swallow you whole. It was a face whose dignified presence insisted that an exclamation point be put on a line from his song "Mannish Blues": "Ain't that a man!" Blues is often a bad dream, with artists dying young, broke or unappreciated - sometimes all three.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | By Georgia Ashby, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The sound of his electric guitar rang out over Wembley Soccer Stadium, and as 69-year-old Jimmy Rogers began to sing a song he had composed, "Walkin' By Myself," his audience sang along. As a guest performer at the Rolling Stones blues tribute in June, Rogers provided the English crowd with authentic postwar Chicago blues, a combination of tender Mississippi Delta blues and aggressive Chicago rhythm. It was the sound that he helped develop in the 1950s when he played with legendary bluesman Muddy Waters.
NEWS
July 8, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
1. b. Muddy Waters. 2. c. Ron Wood. 3. a. "Come On. " 4. d. Aftermath. 5. b. Their Satanic Majesties Request. 6. c. Brian Jones. 7. a. Gimme Shelter. 8. d. Andy Warhol. 9. b. She's the Boss. 10. d. Keith Richards.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2009 | By Nick Cristiano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like James Brown, Sam & Dave made great records, but they were even more dynamic on stage, where their galvanic showmanship revealed another, essential dimension of their artistry. That's what makes Sam & Dave: The Original Soul Men such a treat. This two-hour documentary tells the story of Sam Moore and Dave Prater through interviews with Moore himself (Prater was killed in a 1988 car crash), former Stax Records chief Al Bell, and bandleader Paul Shaffer, who notes, "Sam and Dave were two preachers on stage, preaching the gospel of soul.
NEWS
February 28, 2002 | By Nathaniel Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
Two Buddy Guys shared the Keswick Theatre stage Tuesday night. Both wore overalls, a plaid work shirt, and sneakers, grinned luridly, and wrenched live-wire solos out of a gloriously tacky, black-and-white polka-dot guitar. But while one - the blues maverick, whose high-energy performances have long been the stuff of legend - made an admirable showing, the night was dominated by his underwhelming double. For most of his distended set, the 65-year-old Guy enacted a ritual that was affirming, rather than genuinely moving.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
In 1950, as the blues, gospel and jazz cross-pollinated but before Detroit's Motown, before Memphis' Sun and Stax - and well before Philadelphia International Records - there was Chicago's Chess label. Those of a certain age fondly remember its logo, a silhouette of a king chess piece flanked by those of bishop and knight. Martin, who made her film debut in 1994 with the raucously funny I Like It Like That , wrote and directed this ensemble drama with music and narrative enough for five features.
NEWS
August 18, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Sometimes a unique voice - a boldly odd and enticing tone - comes along and yanks the most jaded listeners from their bubble of indifference. Think of the first time you heard Billie Holiday, Antony, Nina Simone, or Bob Dylan, voices that were/are captivating beyond the notion of being merely pleasurable. Count Tennessee-born Valerie June among those vocalists, with a creaking, emotive sound blending Dinah Washington's shushing jazz inflections and Dolly Parton's high nasal whine into an extravagantly funky chatter.
NEWS
March 9, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
There's a Muddy Waters song that goes "the blues had a baby and they named it rock and roll. " All that was fine until that baby had a slew of grandchildren and somehow spawned the garage rock wrecking crew that is the Black Lips. This all-boy Atlanta quartet - capable of mashing-up blues, doo-wop, country, and psychedelic noise within their rough-hewn punk at the drop of a dime - is notoriously messy. They're famous for on-stage nudity, barfing, and the discharging of other fluids.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 26, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
British singer-songwriter Mike Scott and the Waterboys' primary concerns are apparently blues, water, and having the blues in relation to the water. Scan his 34-year-long catalog and you'll find album titles such as Fisherman's Blues , This Is the Sea , and the recently released Modern Blues . It's a band whose music could be described as soul-blues-shanty-punk. On an unseasonably chilly Thursday night at the Keswick Theatre, Scott and his Waterboys showed how glorious such an unlikely mash-up could be. Scott - a sometimes sneering vocalist of clarity and expressiveness - is more of a smart poet/lyricist than a Muddy Waters blues guy. To be sure, down-home blues did lurk behind some of the numbers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2015 | A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Since the 1990s, Marilyn Manson has crafted for himself an image as an "Antichrist superstar. " Each of his incendiary albums is a sonic blast filled with fear and loathing that would turn his hero, Hunter S. Thompson, absinthe- green with envy. His recent effort The Pale Emperor brings him to the Electric Factory on Friday. It's Manson's bluesiest and most focused melodic effort, loaded with hard, icy lyrics about Robert Johnson-like devils beneath his feet, killing strangers, and weeklong binges.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Blues legend Muddy Waters said he heard himself for the first time in 1941. It was when folklorist and ethnomusicologist Alan Lomax recorded him in his Mississippi home. In the 1930s and early '40s, Lomax traveled the country with his trusty Presto machine, making field recordings of American folk musicians, live at 78 revolutions per minute, onto lacquer-coated "acetate" discs. That Saturday afternoon with Muddy Waters changed the way Waters viewed his music - and it changed blues forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2014 | A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Ruthie Foster has just finished driving from San Antonio to Austin, Texas - home to partner Katie and their 3-year-old daughter, Maya. She's a little tired, considering she's had three record-release parties for her new Promise of a Brand New Day . Tuesday, she'll do the same at World Café Live. Such is the life of the modern blueswoman. New Day is layered in gospel, R&B, Tex-Mex, folk, and conjunto. It's full of departures, chief among them the producer: singer/composer Meshell Ndegeocello.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everyone thought the question had been answered 42 years ago, with passage of the Clean Water Act: What, exactly, are the waters of the United States - waters that warrant government protection to ensure they are drinkable, fishable, and swimmable? Rivers such as the Delaware, regularly plied by cargo ships? Absolutely. The Schuylkill and major tributaries? No debate. But smaller streams? For federal officials, those are muddy waters. Two U.S. Supreme Court decisions, in 2001 and 2006, showed that the regulations were not as clear as the regulators had thought.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he began writing about blues, country, soul, and early rock-and-roll, Peter Guralnick had one simple goal: to convey his own passion for artists such as Muddy Waters, Merle Haggard, Bobby Bland, and Jerry Lee Lewis, and explain why they were so important. Guralnick accomplished just that with his first two collections of artist profiles: 1971's Feel Like Going Home and 1979's Lost Highway . Now those volumes are available as enhanced digital editions ($9.99 each on iTunes)
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Fittingly, WXPN's yearlong Mississippi Blues Project - an online interactive program with accompanying live shows - ends with a dance party Friday night at Theatre of Living Arts. In the hands of Jonny Meister, host of XPN's The Blues Show , and his longtime associate David Dye ( World Cafe creator and DJ for WXPN's "Funky Friday Dance Party"), that finale will celebrate all shades of blues. James Cotton is on board for Friday's live Funky Blues Finale and Dance Party at TLA. Throughout his career, the harmonica player, now 78, has played key roles in some of the blues' greatest recordings.
NEWS
August 18, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Sometimes a unique voice - a boldly odd and enticing tone - comes along and yanks the most jaded listeners from their bubble of indifference. Think of the first time you heard Billie Holiday, Antony, Nina Simone, or Bob Dylan, voices that were/are captivating beyond the notion of being merely pleasurable. Count Tennessee-born Valerie June among those vocalists, with a creaking, emotive sound blending Dinah Washington's shushing jazz inflections and Dolly Parton's high nasal whine into an extravagantly funky chatter.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
BY NOW it's obvious that the highly publicized, $5 million class-action lawsuit charging Budweiser with overstating its alcohol content is pure B.S. The plaintiffs, including two Montgomery County brothers, say that Anheuser-Busch deliberately waters down its beer, and that its alcohol content is "significantly" overstated on its labels. But the lawsuit provides no evidence to back up that claim. It cites no scientific-based data, or even how much Bud drinkers are being shortchanged.
NEWS
July 8, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
1. b. Muddy Waters. 2. c. Ron Wood. 3. a. "Come On. " 4. d. Aftermath. 5. b. Their Satanic Majesties Request. 6. c. Brian Jones. 7. a. Gimme Shelter. 8. d. Andy Warhol. 9. b. She's the Boss. 10. d. Keith Richards.
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