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IN THE NEWS

Muddy Waters

ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1994 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charlie Musselwhite grew up in Memphis, with the blues all around him. "It was really hot in the summer," says the 50-year-old harmonica master, who's marking the half-century with a superb new album, In My Time (Alligator), and a tour that brings him to A.J.'s Sports Bar in Levittown on Sunday afternoon for the Bucks County Blues Society Spring Fever Foot Stomper. "And we lived on this little dead-end road. There were woods at the end, and through the woods there was a creek. And over at the other side of the creek there were fields.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | By Georgia Ashby, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The sound of his electric guitar rang out over Wembley Soccer Stadium, and as 69-year-old Jimmy Rogers began to sing a song he had composed, "Walkin' By Myself," his audience sang along. As a guest performer at the Rolling Stones blues tribute in June, Rogers provided the English crowd with authentic postwar Chicago blues, a combination of tender Mississippi Delta blues and aggressive Chicago rhythm. It was the sound that he helped develop in the 1950s when he played with legendary bluesman Muddy Waters.
NEWS
July 4, 1992 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
At long last the Supreme Court managed to stake out some of that elusive common ground in the ongoing abortion wars. On Monday, they issued a ruling that both sides could attack. Randall Terry, chief guru of pro-life's Operation Rescue hated this decision. And so did Kitty Kolbert, lawyer for the pro-choice forces. Standing on the Supreme Court steps, a sputtering Terry said that the three justices writing for the majority "have stabbed the pro-life movement in the back and reaffirmed the bloodshed.
NEWS
July 1, 1992 | By GEORGE F. WILL
The Supreme Court is most prolix when least principled. On Monday, the court produced 1 pound 14 ounces of opinions about abortion. It's mostly pseudo-constitutional reasoning traces back 19 years to 57 words by which the court severed its original abortion decision from the Constitution: "The right of privacy, whether it be founded in the 14th Amendment's concept of personal liberty and restrictions upon state action, as we feel it is, or,...
SPORTS
April 27, 1991 | by Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
The message was sent out by the Eagles on draft day, and Andre Waters didn't need his answering machine to get it. It was delivered live and in color on national television with the 48th name announced during the NFL draft. " . . . With their second choice, the Philadelphia Eagles select Jesse Campbell, safety, North Carolina State. " Minutes later, the Eagles announced that they projected the 6-2 1/2, 212- pound Campbell at strong safety, a position Waters has held down for seven seasons.
NEWS
April 1, 1991 | By Dan DeLuca, Special to The Inquirer
These days, it's not too easy to find a band that plays classic '50s-style Chicago blues, in or out of the Windy City. Sure, there are scores of outfits that cover the standard repertoire, from "Mannish Boy" to "Sweet Home Chicago. " But too often these appeals to contemporary rock audiences - based on warmed-over funk, overblown horns and high-voltage guitars - wind up diluting the source and sounding hopelessly out of date. Jimmy Rogers plays the real stuff. Rogers, who brought his All Star Band to the Ambler Cabaret Friday night, was Muddy Waters' second guitarist from 1951 to 1956.
SPORTS
October 18, 1990 | By Ray Didinger, Daily News Sports Writer
Welcome to another season of dirtysomething, the NFC East miniseries in which the Washington Redskins critique the Eagles' brand of football. In yesterday's installment, several Redskins discussed the Eagles' latest prime-time performance, a 32-24 win over the Minnesota Vikings. Specifically, the Redskins addressed safety Andre Waters's controversial knee shots on Minnesota quarterback Rich Gannon that are currently under review by NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue. "I thought it was outrageous," defensive tackle Tim Johnson said.
SPORTS
August 25, 1990 | By Ben Callaway, Special to The Inquirer
Tom Biffle, a 32-year-old professional angler from Wagoner, Okla., overcame rainy conditions and increased his lead yesterday in the BASS Masters Classic, freshwater fishing's most prestigious event. Biffle caught his second five-bass limit for a cumulative total of 25 pounds, 8 ounces. All 10 fish were released alive after the weigh-in at the Richmond Coliseum. Rain the night before and during much of yesterday's competition made fishing difficult for the 41 finalists. Muddied waters in many parts of the James River and its tributaries forced competitors to revise game plans after they had experienced good conditions during Thursday's opening day of the three-day tournament.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1990 | By David Hinckley, New York Daily News
As important as Muddy Waters' music was in postwar America, relatively few people will soak up all his genius the first time through. The rewards for staying with it, however, are vast. "The Chess Box," a beautifully produced, well-annotated, six-album, three-CD box set (MCA), is as close as anyone will come to presenting a capsule history of Muddy Waters. It includes 72 tracks, from "Gypsy Woman" in 1947 through the early '70s. Along the way it picks up a few obscurities - the unreleased "Good Looking Woman" from 1948, plus some alternate takes - but mostly it sticks to the core of Waters' music, classic blues like "Rolling Stone," "I Just Want to Make Love to You," "Forty Days and Forty Nights," "Got My Mojo Workin," "She's Nineteen Years Old," "Mannish Boy" and "Hoochie Coochie Man. " Ironically, this is where the uninitiated may get confused.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1989 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
Muddy Waters had a face that was as majestic as the blues. It was defined by high cheekbones, a broad nose and eyes that always held a twinkle. His mouth, topped by a suave, meticulously groomed mustache, was small, except when he smiled, when it seemed big enough to swallow you whole. It was a face whose dignified presence insisted that an exclamation point be put on a line from his song "Mannish Blues": "Ain't that a man!" Blues is often a bad dream, with artists dying young, broke or unappreciated - sometimes all three.
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