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Muffins

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FOOD
May 25, 1986 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
It probably was inevitable. Once you accept the idea that there can be whole stores devoted to chocolate chip cookies, the current mania for huge muffins looks like just one more manifestation of our growing hunger for those homier pleasures no longer to be reliably found at home. Everywhere you go to buy food, from deluxe gourmet stores to standard supermarkets, there they are: giant muffins, all supposedly freshly baked (as indeed all muffins must be to be really good), all implying, whether they come right out and say so or not, that they are made from honest ingredients and are somehow healthier than the snack cakes that they uncannily resemble as soon as you bite into one. Fresh from having succumbed to a particularly tempting, appetizingly brown, attractively hump-topped, disgustingly sweet, caramel-coloring-blighted bran muffin that had considerably less to recommend it than a decent store cookie, I can only conclude that today's muffin purveyors still have a long way to go before home cooks have any reason to stop producing one of the very easiest of all baked goodies.
FOOD
May 19, 1993 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
Pepperidge Farm Wholesome Choice Muffins. Blueberry, corn, apple oatmeal and raisin bran. $2.35 per 11.5- to 12.25-ounce box of six frozen muffins. Bonnie: These days, food manufacturers, supermarkets and doughnut shops are baking fresh muffins because of their reputation as a healthful alternative to doughnuts and Danish. In most cases, that reputation is undeserved. The reason muffins seem as satisfying as doughnuts is that they often contain the same fat and sugar. A Sara Lee Golden Corn muffin, for instance, contains more fat than a Bavarian cream-filled, chocolate-frosted Dunkin Donut!
FOOD
August 7, 1996 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Muffins may have mass appeal, but it is scones that are attracting more sophisticated palates. In fact, sources show that the scone is being touted as the croissant of the '90s. Scones now come in flavors from sun-dried tomato and basil to low-fat lemon ginger, from cheese-oatmeal to white chocolate. But for some coffee shops and cafes, scones are still a specialty item. There is usually only one batch of the regular chocolate-chip and cinnamon-raisin scones baked each morning at the Warwick's cafe, Capriccio.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1990 | By Janet Ruth Falon, Special to The Inquirer
People who know me well call me the muffin maven. If there's a muffin within smelling distance, I'm gone. In fact, my personal history is studded with muffin-related memories: the co-worker with whom I stoked up, every day, on early morning muffins and coffee; the man I dated longer than I really wanted because he bought me divine muffins once a week; a longtime lover who smoothed over our spats by stocking our freezer with chichi muffins....
NEWS
February 12, 1996 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Tell just about any marketing consultant about the operation at Ann's DoNut Shop here and you'd be likely to induce panic. In a world where bagels and muffins are cornering the leading shares of stomachs, Ann's serves only doughnuts. And in a consumer market driven by designer coffees and the ambiance of comfortable nooks, Ann's offers no drinks and is strictly take-out. But ask owner John Carpenter whether his shop at Sixth and Welsh Streets is about to be done in by coffee bars, and he laughs out loud.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1994 | By David I. Turner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Owen Stern grew up in the bakery business, the son of a kosher baker in Rockland County, N.Y., and the great-grandson of a baker in Germany. But he loathed the idea of making a career in baking, of getting up at 2:30 every morning to prepare for the morning trade. Stern knew that small bakers didn't make much money, and that it was getting harder and harder to find the skilled bakers needed to run an old- fashioned mom-and-pop bakery. He wasn't the only baker's son or daughter who wanted to avoid those early mornings.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
BY THE NUMBERS 675k muffins sold each year. 24k cubic square feet of BK's new freezer. 800k miles driven each year by BK trucks. 7,000 different types of products in the BK warehouse from more than 40 countries.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013
WE KNOW better than to try to pin down the details on Anne Cappelletti's homemades. But a plate of Crabby Snacks sounds like the perfect accompaniment to Sunday's broadcast of the Academy Awards, which starts at 8:30 p.m. on ABC. The finger food - a/k/a Crab Bites, a/k/a Old English Crab Hors D'Oeuvres - is featured in Oscar-nominated, locally filmed "Silver Linings Playbook. " It's a tradition in the household of former Haddonfield teacher Matthew Quick, who wrote the novel. CRABBY SNACKS 7 oz. can crabmeat (well-drained)
NEWS
March 22, 1986
As a suburban commuter, I pay the exorbitant, confiscatory Philadelphia wage tax, a tax for which I have no vote. In return I receive filthy streets, public urination and mayors dropping bombs (I helped pay for that "entry device"). And now the unkindest cut of all: The Transport Workers Union is telling me I'm being subsidized by the city. Horse muffins. G.A. Fell West Chester.
FOOD
January 16, 1994 | By Mary Carroll, FOR THE INQUIRER
Unlike yeast breads, quick breads are simple and fast to make, as their name implies. The trick is making them tender and moist . . . and still low in fat. Removing oil, eggs and high-fat dairy products means losing moisture and leavening. Luckily, there are a few lean ingredients that add both back in. Mashed banana, applesauce, low-fat buttermilk and nonfat plain yogurt lend zero flavor but add surprising moistness and lift in muffins, biscuits and other quick breads. To make quick breads rise evenly, mix dry and wet ingredients separately.
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NEWS
June 27, 2014
P ETE MERZBACHER, 25, of Olney, lives above the bakery Philly Bread, which he founded. The startup beat out nine other finalists on June 19 in the inaugural "Lightning in a Bottle Competition" sponsored mainly by ab+c Creative Intelligence, a marketing-and-communications firm in Wilmington and Philly. Winning netted Philly Bread a year's worth of free marketing. The bakery makes a healthy version of the English muffin, dubbed the "Philly Muffin. "   Q: The idea for Philly Bread?
BUSINESS
November 5, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
BY THE NUMBERS 675k muffins sold each year. 24k cubic square feet of BK's new freezer. 800k miles driven each year by BK trucks. 7,000 different types of products in the BK warehouse from more than 40 countries.
FOOD
April 25, 2013 | Craig LaBan
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat of April 23, 2013: Craig LaBan: There's a new cafe in the sunny, modern space at the corner of 12th and Spruce: Toast. It's the house-made English muffins, pictured here, that are the draw. These were almost too good - so perfect they looked just like very good versions of store-bought muffins, but more tender, with toothsome, butter-soaked crannies. Also, I've been enjoying some recent visits to Citizens Bank Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013
WE KNOW better than to try to pin down the details on Anne Cappelletti's homemades. But a plate of Crabby Snacks sounds like the perfect accompaniment to Sunday's broadcast of the Academy Awards, which starts at 8:30 p.m. on ABC. The finger food - a/k/a Crab Bites, a/k/a Old English Crab Hors D'Oeuvres - is featured in Oscar-nominated, locally filmed "Silver Linings Playbook. " It's a tradition in the household of former Haddonfield teacher Matthew Quick, who wrote the novel. CRABBY SNACKS 7 oz. can crabmeat (well-drained)
FOOD
July 26, 2012 | By J.M. Hirsch, Associated Press
What do you do when you are hankering for blueberry muffins, but don't have a muffin pan handy? Or maybe you just don't feel like cranking up the oven on a hot summer day. You cook them in a skillet, using the muffin batter as you would pancake batter. Why not just make blueberry pancakes? Though recipes will vary, most pancake and muffin recipes call for equal amounts of flour and eggs. But while pancakes call for more liquid, muffins get more (often way more) sugar, fat, and baking powder.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | Wires
4 cups (18 ounces) bread flour, divided 1 tablespoon plus 1½ teaspoons sugar 2 teaspoons instant yeast 3 tablespoons melted butter 1½ cups milk, at room temperature 1¼ teaspoons salt ½ cup cornmeal, for dusting 1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, whisk together 3½ cups (15.75 ounces) of the bread flour, sugar, and yeast. 2. Switch to the paddle attachment. With the mixer on low, slowly beat in the melted butter, followed by the milk to form a soft dough.
NEWS
May 10, 2012 | Freelance
For the muffins: 10 ounces unbleached all-purpose flour 1/2 cup confectioners' sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 3 eggs 1/4 cup milk 2 tablespoons heavy cream 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 1 teaspoon lemon zest 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 8 tablespoons unsalted butter, very soft 3/4 cup superfine sugar 1/2 cup sliced roasted almonds For...
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | Joyce Gemperlein
Vegetable cooking spray 2 medium-size onions, cut into  1-inch pieces 2 medium-size carrots, cut into 1-inch pieces 2 ribs celery, cut into 1-inch pieces 1 cup curly-leaf parsley leaves 3 pounds skinless salmon, cut into 2-inch pieces 3 large eggs ½ cup vegetable oil ¼ cup sugar, or to taste 2 teaspoons kosher salt, or to  taste 2 teaspoons freshly ground  black pepper, or to taste ...
NEWS
September 21, 2011 | By Seth Stern, Bloomberg News
WASHINGTON - Justice Department agencies spent too much for food at conferences, in one case serving $16 muffins and in another dishing out beef Wellington appetizers that cost $7.32 per serving, an audit found. "Some conferences featured costly meals, refreshments, and themed breaks that we believe were indicative of wasteful or extravagant spending," Justice's inspector general wrote in a report released Tuesday. The inspector general reviewed a sample of 10 Justice conferences between October 2007 and September 2009 at a cost of $4.4 million, in a period that included the administrations of both Republican George W. Bush and Democrat Barack Obama.
FOOD
November 19, 2009 | By Elisa Ludwig FOR THE INQUIRER
Every year the pumpkin parade arrives earlier - before Labor Day, even, the fluffy pumpkin lattes and baseball mitt-size pumpkin muffins emerge on cue from behind coffee bar counters. Limited-edition pumpkin ales follow, along with sweet-smelling doughnuts and seasonally confusing ice creams. And before long, chunky cans of purees are lining supermarket aisle-end displays, seductively promising smooth-as-silk pies. Yet for all of our pumpkin fetishizing, we tend to take this humble cucurbit for granted, forgetting that it is also real food.
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