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Muhammad Ali

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NEWS
January 9, 1998 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Rusty Pray contributed to this article
Jeremiah Shabazz, 70, former minister of Mosque No. 12 of the Philadelphia Nation of Islam and confidant and adviser to Muhammad Ali, died of congestive heart failure Wednesday. It was Mr. Shabazz, a family member said, who in 1960 persuaded boxer Cassius Clay to become a follower of Elijah Muhammad and to become Muhammad Ali. In the late 1970s, Mr. Shabazz joined Ali's entourage, and news accounts at the time refer to him as the boxer's "top aide," "administrative assistant" and "legal counsel," although he had no law degree.
SPORTS
February 4, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
MUHAMMAD ALI'S daughter knocked down rumors of her father being near death Sunday, saying he was at home watching the Super Bowl. May May Ali said she talked to her father Sunday morning on the phone and he was fine. She said he was watching the Super Bowl at home in Arizona, wearing a Baltimore Ravens jersey. "He's fine, in fact he was talking well this morning," she said in a telephone interview with the Associated Press . "These rumors pop up every once in a while, but there's nothing to them.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2011 | By MARIA ZANKEY, mankeym@phillynews.com 215-854-5444
In February 1973, Elvis Presley gave Muhammad Ali a robe embroidered with the words, "The People's Champion. " In return, Ali presented Elvis with a set of boxing gloves inscribed "You're the Greatest. " It's been more than 33 years since "the King" passed away, but the two legends are reunited at the James A. Michener Art Museum in Doylestown, as part of "Elvis and Ali: American Icons," a dual documentary exhibition. The exhibits, "Elvis at 21: Photographs by Al Wertheimer," and "Muhammad Ali: The making of an icon," chronicle the stars' rise to fame through photography, essays and film.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | Ellen Gray, Daily News
IF MUHAMMAD ALI were fighting now, someone would probably be trying to sign his family up for a "reality" show. One could easily have been set in and around Philly, where the boxer lived during much of the period covered in tonight's "Independent Lens" presentation, "The Trials of Muhammad Ali" (10 p.m. WHYY12). And Khalilah Camacho-Ali would probably be its star. Camacho-Ali, who appears in the film, was also known as Belinda in the days in which she, the fighter's second wife, was helping to keep his spirits up as he waited to see if he'd be jailed for refusing to serve in the military.
NEWS
February 13, 2002 | By DAVID PLOTZ
MUHAMMAD ALI is the Dalai Lama of the post-Sept. 11 world - the beatific sweetheart we call on to sanctify every important moment. He is always available to symbolize, well, whatever the heck you want. The Champ, who may be the world's most famous Muslim and the world's most famous American, is certainly the world's most famous Muslim-American, and he has been using that status for the good. He made news recently by pleading, in Allah's name, for the release of kidnapped Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl.
NEWS
September 15, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Muhammad Ali, dressed in a black suit and wearing sunglasses, stood nearly motionless Thursday night as he stared down intently at the Liberty Medal that had just been presented to him. The 70-year-old Ali, fighting through his Parkinson's disease, briefly lifted his right hand to acknowledge the sustained standing ovation of the audience on the front lawn of the National Constitution Center. The crowd erupted in a rousing chant: "Ali! Ali! Ali!" The world-champion boxer, antiwar hero, and cultural icon was awarded the 2012 medal for his life as a transformative figure personifying the struggle for liberty.
NEWS
August 15, 2012 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Free tickets to the Liberty Medal ceremony honoring boxing legend Muhammad Ali will become available to the public at 10 a.m. today. Ali, 70, whose movement and speech have been slowed by Parkinson's disease, will attend the formal award ceremony. Because he is not physically able to deliver an acceptance speech, his wife, Yolanda, will speak in his stead. The ceremony will take place Sept. 13 at 7 p.m. on the front lawn at the National Constitution Center. About 250 tickets will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.
NEWS
May 7, 2015
LIKE A DOG chasing a car, George Bochetto has been chasing Muhammad Ali's Louisville, Ky., birthplace for some time. And now that he has it, he's not precisely sure what he will do with it. Whatever it is, it will be done with dignity. The Center City lawyer and former Pennsylvania boxing commissioner feels it is a shrine, and should be treated as one, but the details are still forming. It's an understatement to say that Bochetto, a onetime boxer himself, is a devotee of the former heavyweight champion, humanitarian and onetime resident of Cherry Hill.
NEWS
July 25, 2012 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Free tickets to the 2012 Liberty Medal ceremony honoring boxing legend Muhammad Ali will be made available to the public on August 14. Ali, 70, whose movement and speech have been slowed by Parkinson's disease, will attend the formal award ceremony. Because he is not physically able to deliver an acceptance speech, his wife, Yolanda, will speak in his stead. The ceremony will take place Sept. 13 at 7 p.m. on the front lawn at the National Constitution Center. About 250 tickets will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.
SPORTS
October 6, 2013 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Columnist
JERRY LEWIS, uh-huh, that Jerry Lewis, the slapstick comic, looks Muhammad Ali right in the eye, and screeches, "You're a big bag of wind. " A startled Ali interrupts, sputtering. Lewis finally yelps, "Shut up and let me finish . . . you're a big bag of wind but you're one of the greatest entertainers . . . " It's just a moment in "The Trials of Muhammad Ali," a lively new documentary being shown at the Ritz at the Bourse. A defining moment? Entertainer? Is that what Ali was?
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NEWS
May 12, 2015
ISSUE | L&I REFORM Into the weeds The Inquirer Editorial Board's complaints about the ineffectiveness of the city Department of Licenses and Inspections seem to be right on target ("L&I hasn't been 'fixed,' " May 7). But L&I is not completely dysfunctional: I want to report that they were right there, on the spot, when a tenant of ours failed to mow the lawn - saving who knows how many lives. |Betty Mock, Bala Cynwyd ISSUE | MUSIC EDUCATION Learned travels As a proud alumnus of the 1950s-era All-City Orchestra under the distinguished leadership of Louis G. Wersen, I was glad to hear the orchestra will go to Europe ("Student orchestra to tour Italy," May 6)
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three years ago, when George Bochetto read in his morning paper that Muhammad Ali's boyhood home was for sale, he put down his coffee and picked up the phone. "I tried to get hold of the Realtor," said Bochetto, a Philadelphia lawyer and former Pennsylvania boxing commissioner. As a lifetime fan of Ali's and an avid collector of his memorabilia, Bochetto was ready to pay the full $70,000 asking price for the small frame house in Louisville, Ky. His offer came too late. The house where the three-time heavyweight champion lived until he was a teenager had already been sold to Jared Weiss, a Las Vegas real estate investor.
NEWS
May 7, 2015
LIKE A DOG chasing a car, George Bochetto has been chasing Muhammad Ali's Louisville, Ky., birthplace for some time. And now that he has it, he's not precisely sure what he will do with it. Whatever it is, it will be done with dignity. The Center City lawyer and former Pennsylvania boxing commissioner feels it is a shrine, and should be treated as one, but the details are still forming. It's an understatement to say that Bochetto, a onetime boxer himself, is a devotee of the former heavyweight champion, humanitarian and onetime resident of Cherry Hill.
SPORTS
May 4, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
During last week's civil disturbances in Baltimore, when a baseball game had to be contested in a vacuum, America's fault lines were again exposed. Black and white. Left and right. Rich and poor. Choose your side and dig in your heels. As it turned out, Wednesday's eerie White Sox-Orioles game, a spectacle meant for fans being played in a ballpark where none were present, came a day before the 40th anniversary of the Vietnam War's end. That long and profoundly painful conflict felt like a decade of Baltimores.
SPORTS
December 10, 2014 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Columnist
MUHAMMAD ALI stood on that street corner in Miami Beach the day after he beat up Sonny Liston to win the world's heavyweight championship, surrounded by cynical sportswriters, and said, "I don't have to be what you want me to be," the best, truest thing Ali ever said. Dick Allen was already walking that walk, talking that talk. Well, maybe he didn't talk that talk, because he kept his feelings deep inside that Mosler Safe of a chest that sat atop that narrow waist, bookended by those steel-cable arms that enabled him to hit 20 homers that traveled more than 500 feet.
SPORTS
October 10, 2014 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Staff Writer
MUHAMMAD ALI has a big heart, a kind heart, a generous heart. Loves kids, especially his own, which number seven or nine, or more, depending on who is doing the counting. Heavyweight champion in a brutal sport, loves his kids, nice story line, but you can't stretch that into a 2-hour documentary, no matter how many cute-as-a-cupcake phone conversations you include. They try in "I Am Ali," which opens in theaters today. It is no more a complete and honest depiction of Ali than any of the books, magazine articles, films and documentaries that preceded it. Maybe next year.
SPORTS
September 25, 2014 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Staff Writer
THEY JOSTLED Dock Ellis awake around noon, the story goes, their voices shrill with anxiety. He was in Los Angeles and his team, the Pittsburgh Pirates, was in San Diego, playing that night. "You're pitching today," they yelped. "Noooo," Ellis moaned. "What happened to yesterday?" Yesterday was an off day, so he'd gotten permission to go home, to Gardena, Calif. Took some LSD, hopped into a rental car, knowing the drug would kick in when he got to Los Angeles. Took some more when he got there, making everything seem kinder, gentler, swirling in a technicolor glaze.
SPORTS
July 22, 2014 | BY JAKE KAPLAN, Daily News Staff Writer kaplanj@phillynews.com
THE ENORMITY of it catches you off guard. Even though you walk into the room knowing what you're there to see, visualizing a 9-foot effigy is different from actually standing next to one. Currently a few hundred-pound mixture of clay and foam dominating a second-floor Fishtown studio, the much-anticipated statue of late Philadelphia boxing icon Smokin' Joe Frazier is about 6 months from completion. After 4 months, the mold has certainly taken shape, but sculptor Stephen Layne expects to take time through September to accentuate features such as the gloves and shoes and otherwise fine-tune the project.
SPORTS
May 28, 2014 | BY BERNARD FERNANDEZ, For the Daily News
IN THE EARLY-MORNING hours on Sunday, the real Rocky Balboa passed away in the intensive-care unit of Chestnut Hill Hospital. His name was Matthew Saad Muhammad and his life story is more compelling, and more unlikely, than anything that fellow Philly guy Sylvester Stallone ever put up on the silver screen. No, Saad wasn't an Italian Stallion, but he was, in the words of fellow light-heavyweight champion and close friend Eddie Mustafa Muhammad, "the king of the comeback, the master of chills and thrills.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
In the hands of composer/free-jazz high priest William Parker, the double bass moves from its position as rumbling, rhythmic backdrop to an elegant lead instrument through which he's led groups costarring a Murderers' Row of like-minded lions of the avant-garde. "If the music is happening on a high level, things will fall into place," says Parker. "We practice to allow the music to flow through us. " Next week, with drummer/composer Muhammad Ali, a rotating cast of local free-jazz acolytes, and an all-Philadelphian chamber ensemble, Parker will present an Ars Nova Workshop-commissioned four-piece suite, Flower in a Stained Glass Window (for creative music ensemble and improvising trio)
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