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Mulch

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NEWS
February 9, 1997 | By Richard Sine, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Though Mary Coe is president of Friends of Radnor Trails, she had never hiked Skunk Hollow until last month. She said it reminded her of her childhood exploring the woods near her home at the foot of the Catskills. "I felt I was 9 years old again, catching pollywogs and skipping across streams. " With a little bit of work, Coe said, new generations of children could be exploring Skunk Hollow, their imaginations turning old stone walls into medieval fortresses. But to those Radnor residents who have heard of Skunk Hollow, a sylvan paradise is not necessarily the first image that comes to mind.
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | By Charlotte Kidd, Special to The Inquirer
There's little left of the tons of leaves that area residents dutifully raked to their curbs or collected in brown paper bags. The hefty piles have been vacuumed up by noisy machines, and the bags have been heaved onto open- back trucks. Either way, the broad maple, jagged oak and delicate weeping willow leaves have largely disappeared from front yards. But in many municipalities, the discarded leaves will return this spring and summer - as garden mulch to keep the weeds from engulfing the tomatoes or to enhance elegant landscaping.
NEWS
January 8, 1989 | By Diane M. Fiske, Special to The Inquirer
From early December until shortly after New Year's, they are a key part of holiday celebrations, the center of family gatherings. Thereafter, Christmas trees are nothing but a disposal problem. The solution, depending upon where one lives, seems to rest somewhere between chippers, chopping, landfills and bonfires. Tredyffrin Township is offering its residents the chance to say goodbye to their Christmas trees today by taking them to the leaf-composting center on Cassatt Road near the Philadelphia Electric terminals from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The trees will become part of the compost used by the township to help nurture foliage through the year.
NEWS
January 8, 1989 | By Charlotte Kidd, Special to The Inquirer
Christmas comes once a year but the holiday trees hang around indefinitely - in various forms. At the Churchville Nature Center in Bucks County, suburban park explorers might find themselves walking on their very own Christmas trees in the spring. The center takes any donated trees and chips them into a mulch that is used on park trails. In post-Christmas tradition, a county forester hauls in a chipper and processes about 1,000 trees before the season is over on Jan. 21, according to assistant park naturalist Kristen Benson.
NEWS
January 25, 1987 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a previous life, the fragrant boughs held bright tinsel and balls of delicate glass. A few months hence, they will rest near scenes of more natural beauty - woodland paths and beds of flowers. But now, the limbs, trunks and needles of 30,000 to 40,000 Philadelphia Christmas trees are just sitting, waiting for a home, in mammoth woodpiles at the Pennypack Environmental Center and two other locations. The mulch created by chopping the trees into tiny pieces with mulchers is available free to anyone who comes to pick it up, said Robert Grow, park manager for the Fairmount Park Commission.
LIVING
March 17, 2006 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We've all heard about supersize alligators roaming the sewers. Now, there's an e-mail crisscrossing cyberspace warning gardeners about killer mulch made from termite-infested New Orleans trees. "Be very careful about buying mulch this year," the e-mail warns. "Formosan termites will be the bonus in many of those bags. " Not true, the experts say. Trees felled by Hurricane Katrina, termite-infested or otherwise, are not being shredded into mulch to sell to unsuspecting customers at Home Depot and Lowe's stores for "dirt-cheap prices" this spring.
LIVING
March 13, 2009 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Here's a more definitive answer to the question posed by a reader with stains from wood mulch on his vinyl siding, thanks to Joe Ponessa, the Rutgers professor, and reader Anthony Canamucio of Bensalem. Both Ponessa and Canamucio say the stains sound like "artillery fungus. " Canamucio says many of his neighbors have had problems with artillery fungus, which, he says, has proven to be impossible to remove from the vinyl siding. One preventive measure suggested is to aerate the mulch at least a couple of times a year.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | By Charlotte Kidd, Special to The Inquirer
Forty years ago, few Main Line estates were without their own leaf mulch piles - restocked season after season, recalled John DiJiosia Jr., co-owner of Plymouth Nursery. As land parcels grew smaller, muncipalities went into the leaf-collection business. And some, like Upper Moreland Township, are finding themselves shoulder deep in leaf mulch. So they are marketing the product to residents and landscapers. For several years, DiJiosia has been using leaves stockpiled by Plymouth Township.
NEWS
March 25, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the storms rolled in last month, people were preoccupied with getting their power back and moving all those fallen trees off the roads and driveways. What would happen to the trees that fell? That was a problem for later. Well, later is now, and homeowners and workers around the region are still collecting and disposing of the trees that caused so much havoc. "The bottom line is, it's just everywhere," Rick Crecraft, who owns a tree-trimming company, said after one of the worst storms.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
After a year of trashing Christmas trees, Philadelphia has decided to do the right thing. It's shipping tons of them to a big wood chipper in the suburbs - even though it's a more expensive way to get them out of town. Truckload by truckload, the trees are being dispatched to Bucks County to be turned into environmentally beneficial mulch. The mulch then will be used for landscaping at the same landfill that takes Philly's trash - and at the nearby offices of Waste Management of North America.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2015 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Make some lists. I know this sounds like a pretty passive thing to be doing when the garden beckons, but if you're as ADD as me, this is necessary. Walk around the garden and write down all that needs to be done, area by area. Prioritize, organize the tools and supplies needed for a job, and then do it. Otherwise, it's like impulse buying: You'll grab the first task that screams at you (usually planting something), go to get a tool, and end up cleaning out the tool shed instead. Meanwhile, there's a half-dug hole out there, and you're wondering why you have a handful of seeds in your pocket.
NEWS
February 23, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
LAST SUMMER, Irene Madrak, executive director of the North Light Community Center in Manayunk, was having nightmares about a dream playground turning into a giant bowl of mulch soup. Her dilemma began when KaBoom! - the company that builds playgrounds in a day with the help of community volunteers - offered one to North Light, which has delivered social services to families and kids since 1938 on Green Lane near Wilde Street. "If we wanted a new KaBoom! playground," Madrak said, "we had to remove our old playground and 2,500 square feet of asphalt.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2014 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Prepare trees and shrubs for cold weather ahead. From now until the ground freezes hard, water trees and shrubs weekly, making sure to soak the soil deeply. These woody plants must go through the winter with enough moisture around their roots to prevent the roots from drying out. In addition to watering, mulching - with bought mulch or raked leaves - helps retain soil moisture. Leave a three-inch mulch-free circle around each trunk to prevent the bark from rotting or being damaged by nesting critters.
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a controversial Montgomery County mulch operation agreed last month to move out of Douglass Township, many residents breathed a sigh of relief. Mountain Mulch had raised the ire of neighbors, who accused owners of violating zoning laws by illegally operating a large commercial business on a corner of preserved farmland. But the fight over Mountain Mulch may be far from over. Township officials are now suing former Supervisor Fred Theil, saying he started the trouble by giving the company permission to accept piles of natural debris left over from Hurricane Sandy.
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
DOUGLASS TWP. A controversial Montgomery County mulch operation has agreed to relocate from a parcel of preserved farmland in Douglass Township, under a court settlement with the municipality and residents. The township and residents sued Mountain Mulch last year, accusing the Sassamansville Road company of violating zoning laws by operating a large commercial business on preserved farmland. The settlement, signed April 24 in Montgomery County Court, calls for the company to relocate and for the township to take no further legal action.
NEWS
March 25, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the storms rolled in last month, people were preoccupied with getting their power back and moving all those fallen trees off the roads and driveways. What would happen to the trees that fell? That was a problem for later. Well, later is now, and homeowners and workers around the region are still collecting and disposing of the trees that caused so much havoc. "The bottom line is, it's just everywhere," Rick Crecraft, who owns a tree-trimming company, said after one of the worst storms.
NEWS
January 2, 2014 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
NORTHEAST PHILA. The scent of burning wood wafted over a Northeast Philadelphia neighborhood Tuesday as firefighters continued to monitor mulch piles that had burned out of control for more than a day. The blaze began about 2 a.m. Sunday at the waste-wood site operated by Northeast Philly Mulch on Tomlinson Road near Roosevelt Boulevard in the Somerton section. Fire Department Capt. Clifford Gilliam said crews used heavy equipment to break apart the towering stockpiles of mulch before they could attack the blaze.
NEWS
December 27, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lara Kelly's Christmas tree is still beautiful, still cheery with the decorations that her 8-year-old daughter, Harper Leary, carefully selected and hung. But not for long. Next weekend, it will be transformed into a pile of chips and spread in a community park near Kelly's Northern Liberties home, starting a new life as mulch. It's just one part of a grassroots effort that Kelly started - and that has spread quickly - to deal sustainably with the post-Christmas glut of dying, needle-dropping trees.
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