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Multiple Myeloma

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SPORTS
April 10, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
New York Yankees pitching coach Mel Stottlemyre has a form of blood cancer that he said was diagnosed about a year ago. The 58-year-old coach will begin treatment in New York immediately but expects to keep working with the team. "I feel fine," Stottlemyre said yesterday in Seattle, where the Yankees lost to the Mariners. "Now it's time for me to go in and tackle this. " The cancer attacks plasma, the fluid part of the blood, and is called multiple myeloma, a malignant disease of the bone marrow.
NEWS
December 11, 1999 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roger Neilson is facing a formidable foe. Multiple myeloma is a malignancy of plasma cells, a type of white blood cell in the bone marrow. Plasma cells make antibodies, which normally fight infection. But in multiple myeloma, these cells begin multiplying uncontrollably, causing changes in blood chemistry that damage the bones, the kidneys, and the body's ability to fight infection. The disease strikes about 14,000 people a year in the United States, mostly those in their 70s. Early symptoms often include pain in the bones, chest or back, plus fatigue, weight loss or other signs of anemia.
SPORTS
January 5, 2001 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ottawa Senators assistant coach Roger Neilson was in town yesterday for a follow-up examination resulting from the recent surgical removal of a malignant mole. Neilson had the mole removed from his leg last month in Canada. The former Flyers head coach is fine, according to his doctor, Isadore Brodsky, chief of hematological oncology at Hahnemann University Hospital. Neilson underwent a bone marrow transplant in March as part of his treatment for multiple myeloma, or bone marrow cancer.
NEWS
March 4, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elan Prystowsky, 46, of Queen Village, a real estate developer, died of multiple myeloma Wednesday, March 2, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Prystowsky operated two firms, Queen Village Development Co. and Gimme Shelter, with partners Cliff Grunes and Chris Dadaris. They bought and renovated properties for residential use in Queen Village and in Northern Liberties, where they converted a former factory into condominiums. They also built a single-family home in Bucks County.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's bad enough to have cancer. Paying for it pushes some patients toward financial ruin, adding a layer of stress that the medical system is not addressing adequately, a Philadelphia-based organization for social workers says. The Association of Oncology Social Work released results yesterday of a survey of cancer patients and caregivers that found significant financial problems even among patients who had insurance. The survey sample was small - 169 patients and 131 caregivers.
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Dr. Herman Corn, 76, formerly of Langhorne, a retired periodontist who devoted much of his time to helping fellow cancer patients, died Monday of multiple myeloma at the Hospice of Southwest Florida. He had been afflicted for several years. Dr. Corn was a founder of a multiple myeloma support group and a founder and board member of the Wellness Community of Southwest Florida, both in Sarasota. He had moved to Sarasota eight years ago from Longboat Key, Fla. Previously, he had resided in Langhorne for 43 years.
NEWS
February 5, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kenneth L. Montgomery, 71, of Roslyn, an auto dealership operator and drag racer, died Monday, Jan. 28, of lewy body dementia and multiple myeloma at Abington Hospice in Warminster. In 1960, Mr. Montgomery started Montgomery Auto in Keswick with his father, Jack, and older brother Jack Jr., now deceased. The business is operated by Mr. Montgomery's son Kenneth Jr. in Jenkintown. Mr. Montgomery was an avid drag racer. From 1970 to 1977, he was sponsored by Chrysler Corp. for the Chrysler drag team.
SPORTS
March 27, 2001 | By Tim Panaccio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roger Neilson has added a new twist to his wardrobe. "I've been wearing this pressurized panty hose," the former Flyers coach said. "Cost 120 bucks and I have already gone through two. It forces the blood up. " Neilson, a 66-year-old assistant coach with the Senators, must wear the hose after surgery earlier this season that removed a cancerous mole on his right leg. The support hose controls swelling in his leg. The melanoma is Neilson's...
NEWS
September 29, 2004 | By Claude Lewis
The final hours in the life of Rose DeWolf were marked by dignity and grace. For more than 10 years, the 70-year-old columnist, author, newspaper reporter, and TV personality battled multiple myeloma, a destructive and usually fatal disease involving multiple tumors of the bone and bone marrow. Many of Rose's friends were surprised to learn of her death, or even that she had been ill. For all her infectious laughter and joyful bombast, she was a private person. Rose had two strokes of good luck that enabled her to maintain her grace and dignity.
SPORTS
March 28, 2003 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
New York Mets bench coach Don Baylor has the same type of bone-marrow cancer that New York Yankees pitching coach Mel Stottlemyre was diagnosed with three years ago. After a spring-training physical examination last month, a bone-marrow test in New York on March 12 revealed that Baylor had multiple myeloma, the Mets said. Baylor, 53, will receive four consecutive days of oral and intravenous chemotherapy during the Mets' first regular-season homestand, which begins March 31 against the Chicago Cubs.
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NEWS
March 17, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Laura Reppert Unger, 85, formerly of Paoli, a volunteer, died of complications from multiple myeloma Monday, March 4, at her home in Dunwoody Village, a retirement community in Newtown Square. She moved there five years ago after residing in Paoli for more than 40 years. Mrs. Unger was the widow of Richard C. Unger, longtime president of Unger Chevrolet in Phoenixville. He died in 2010, two weeks before their 60th anniversary. Mrs. Unger was born in Altoona, Pa., the fourth of six girls.
NEWS
February 5, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kenneth L. Montgomery, 71, of Roslyn, an auto dealership operator and drag racer, died Monday, Jan. 28, of lewy body dementia and multiple myeloma at Abington Hospice in Warminster. In 1960, Mr. Montgomery started Montgomery Auto in Keswick with his father, Jack, and older brother Jack Jr., now deceased. The business is operated by Mr. Montgomery's son Kenneth Jr. in Jenkintown. Mr. Montgomery was an avid drag racer. From 1970 to 1977, he was sponsored by Chrysler Corp. for the Chrysler drag team.
NEWS
June 29, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elizabeth DeCamp Wilson of Mount Airy, who made math exciting for students at Germantown Friends School for more than 30 years, died of multiple myeloma at home Tuesday, June 21, a day after her 83d birthday. Mrs. Wilson began teaching at Germantown Friends School when her children were in school there. She spent most of her career there teaching math in the upper school. She inspired her students with her enthusiasm, her son, Tim, said. "To her, mathematics was no dreary round of computing logarithms but a vibrant discipline full of challenging questions," he wrote in a tribute.
NEWS
March 4, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elan Prystowsky, 46, of Queen Village, a real estate developer, died of multiple myeloma Wednesday, March 2, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Prystowsky operated two firms, Queen Village Development Co. and Gimme Shelter, with partners Cliff Grunes and Chris Dadaris. They bought and renovated properties for residential use in Queen Village and in Northern Liberties, where they converted a former factory into condominiums. They also built a single-family home in Bucks County.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2010
DEAR ABBY: "Devastated in Oklahoma" asked how she can be supportive of her father, who is battling lung cancer. I was in a similar situation 3 1/2 years ago when my dad was diagnosed with multiple myeloma, a cancer of the blood. It was terrifying witnessing the physical impact it had on my dad. I realized there wasn't anything I could do for his pain - that was up to his doctors. But I figured out what I could do: I could raise money for cancer research. I joined the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society's Team in Training and trained for an endurance bike ride while raising money for cancer.
NEWS
June 15, 2010
Catherine Elkins Delahunty, 88, of Clifton Heights, a retired sales associate, died of multiple myeloma Friday, June 11, at Taylor Hospice in Ridley Park. Mrs. Delahunty graduated from West Philadelphia Catholic High School. During World War II, she worked in the Army Quartermaster's Depot in Philadelphia and later was a secretary for the Curtis Publishing Co. In 1953, she married Edward J. Delahunty, and they had seven children. He became ill, and she went to work part time at the J.C. Penney Co. department store in Upper Darby.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's bad enough to have cancer. Paying for it pushes some patients toward financial ruin, adding a layer of stress that the medical system is not addressing adequately, a Philadelphia-based organization for social workers says. The Association of Oncology Social Work released results yesterday of a survey of cancer patients and caregivers that found significant financial problems even among patients who had insurance. The survey sample was small - 169 patients and 131 caregivers.
SPORTS
June 13, 2006 | Inquirer wire services
Embattled pitcher Jason Grimsley was suspended for 50 games by Major League Baseball yesterday, less than a week after federal agents raided his home during an investigation into performance-enhancing drugs. Commissioner Bud Selig's office suspended Grimsley, 38, for violating baseball's joint drug prevention and treatment program, based on his statements to authorities regarding human growth hormone. The Arizona Diamondbacks released the reliever Wednesday - they don't intend to pay him, either - and his agent said he did not expect Grimsley to play again.
NEWS
June 21, 2005 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Veteran actor Roy Scheider, perhaps best known for Jaws - not to mention his brilliant turn opposite Gene Hackman in The French Connection - is battling multiple myeloma, a cancer of the white blood cells in bone marrow. The actor tells the New York Daily News that he has just undergone a bone-marrow transplant to treat the disease. "It went well," said Scheider, 72. "They harvested my stem cells. I was my own donor. " He pointed out the irony that in the John Grisham legal thriller The Rainmaker, he played the chief executive officer of an insurance company that wouldn't pay for a client's bone-marrow transplant.
NEWS
September 29, 2004 | By Claude Lewis
The final hours in the life of Rose DeWolf were marked by dignity and grace. For more than 10 years, the 70-year-old columnist, author, newspaper reporter, and TV personality battled multiple myeloma, a destructive and usually fatal disease involving multiple tumors of the bone and bone marrow. Many of Rose's friends were surprised to learn of her death, or even that she had been ill. For all her infectious laughter and joyful bombast, she was a private person. Rose had two strokes of good luck that enabled her to maintain her grace and dignity.
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