CollectionsMultiple Sclerosis
IN THE NEWS

Multiple Sclerosis

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 16, 2010 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nasha Smith knows that skeptics would say her multiple sclerosis got better after an unorthodox treatment at Lankenau Hospital simply because she believed it would. But the 40-year-old Reading resident also knows the "placebo effect" can't explain her transformation. Practically overnight, she went from being homebound - disabled by foot numbness, fatigue, balance problems, and painful bowel spasms that left her incontinent - to being able to complete a three-mile fund-raising walk for MS. "I know there's a lot of controversy about this, but I don't know why," Smith said.
SPORTS
November 30, 2012
Minnesota Wild goalie Josh Harding has multiple sclerosis. The Wild confirmed the diagnosis and said that Harding is undergoing treatment for the disease, which attacks the body's immune system and affects the central nervous system. General manager Chuck Fletcher said he knows the "competitive fire" Harding has used in his hockey career will help him fight this challenge. AUTO RACING: Dale Earnhardt Jr. has tied Bill Elliott's record of 10 straight wins as NASCAR's most popular driver.
NEWS
May 21, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
CHINO BERMUDEZ was a student at Bok Vocational High School when he heard his first rap lyrics. He was smitten. From then on, he spent his spare time rapping out rap lyrics. So, he was never a Biggie Smalls or a Sean "Diddy" Combs - his heroes - but Chino had fun trying. Music was a big part of Chino's life. Besides the rappers, he was also a fan of R&B, and singer/songwriter Keyshia Cole was his favorite female entertainer. A handsome, spirited young man, Eliezer "Chino" Bermudez's life was cut cruelly short by multiple sclerosis.
NEWS
February 12, 1995 | By Rachel E. Stassen-Berger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Toik, a four-legged, multi-eyed alien, has just begun a visit to the mind of an earthling, Derek, when he discovers that his host is "defective. " The alien, who describes himself as looking like a baby elephant without a head or tail, spies a "strange wheeled object" beside Derek's bed. But Derek doesn't think he's disabled. His mind tells the alien guest: "I am perfectly able except for the limitations of my multiple sclerosis . . . but handicapped, because it's harder for me to do what I want.
NEWS
August 27, 1993 | By Alissa Wolf, FOR THE INQUIRER
You can engage in some wacky antics, namely sumo wrestling and human bowling, to benefit a worthy cause Sunday at Polo Bay, 9300 Amherst Ave., Margate, 609-823-2144. Sumo wrestling - to inform those who naturally associate it with the Japanese - is sort of a modified bar-fight-for-fun conducted between two club patrons who don foam rubber suits with diapers and helmets with wigs, then try to knock each other down. It's becoming a club fad. In human bowling, a person is strapped inside a large metal cagelike ball and rolled across a floor toward a large set of bowling pins.
NEWS
June 5, 2005 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Jan Lipes is reading, or in his words, "absorbing" Conversations With Cezanne. The glossy-covered book rests on the back of his motorized wheelchair. "I've embraced Cezanne," said the self-taught painter, who is captivated by the post-impressionist's attention to form and homage to nature. Lipes, 53, a physician until multiple sclerosis forced him to leave medicine, described how he approaches a blank canvas. "I can reduce an image to a couple of main lines to form the skeleton on which the entire painting rests - the main horizontal, the horizon, and one or two other lines," the Solebury artist said.
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | By Donald C. Drake, Inquirer Staff Writer
The blood samples were from Sweden and Florida. The testing kits were from California. The research was done in Philadelphia. And finally Friday, more than five years after it all started, the scientists announced their discovery: They had found an unusual new type of virus, which they thought might cause multiple sclerosis. If true, this could lead to the development of drugs to treat the incurable, crippling disease, which in the United States alone afflicts 240,000 people.
NEWS
April 8, 2001 | By Marc Levy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Harriet Berkey can now lift a half-gallon jug of milk. She also can stand on the tips of her toes and reach for items without losing her balance. As mundane as both activities might seem, Berkey, 56, of Evesham, has spent 1 1/2 years attending strength classes at the Mount Laurel branch of the Family Y of Burlington County to help her maintain her strength and keep her balance while fighting the effects of multiple sclerosis. "When I left work, I knew that I'd have to do something to keep myself moving because if you don't use it, you lose it," said Berkey, a former nurse anesthetist who was diagnosed with the disease about two years ago after she began having trouble maintaining her balance.
NEWS
December 10, 1999 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court said yesterday that flagging standardized test results to disclose that the test-taker got extra time or some other accommodation because of a disability does not violate federal disability law. The unanimous ruling by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit came in an appeal by the National Board of Medical Examiners, which had been barred by a lower court from flagging the medical-licensing scores...
NEWS
December 18, 1997 | By Lisa Sandberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
George B. Carr was disabled with multiple sclerosis, but his wife, Rita, is an independent woman who was intent on taking care of her husband despite her job, neighbors said. She left for work at a hospital at 8:30 a.m. yesterday and was due to check in on him during her lunch hour, as she always did, neighbors and officials said. But at 9, fire consumed the second floor of her home and took the life of her husband, who was unable to get out of bed on his own, officials said. Borough police believe smoking may have caused the blaze, which destroyed the upper floor at 42 Summit St., where Rita and George Carr, 39, and their teenage son had lived for five or six years.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 25, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
The new Bancroft Neuro-Rehab Resnick Center, which will seek to help adults with brain injuries learn how to perform daily chores, opened Friday in Mount Laurel. The 18,000-square-foot facility will offer rehabilitation to people with neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, other dementias, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, concussions, and stroke, according to the nonprofit center's announcement. It will also serve children and adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities, and help adults reenter the workforce.
NEWS
December 23, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ALEXIS MCKINNEY had strong empathy for people who she believed suffered from society's various inequities. She not only had empathy, she had the passion and drive to do something about it. Her focus was mainly on the problems of being African-American, but her embrace covered anyone she thought of as a victim. "She was very committed to the community," said her brother, Frederick B. Phillips, a prominent Washington-based psychologist and social worker. "She was very committed to those she felt had experienced negative impact from society.
NEWS
April 28, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a closeted Temple University student in 1950, Edith Windsor could not have imagined the reception she would receive at her alma mater in 2014: an award for her activism; a standing ovation from a large, adoring crowd; a presentation from the mayor. Windsor, now 84, won the lawsuit that toppled the federal Defense of Marriage Act in 2013 and has been called the matriarch of the gay-rights movement. Sharp, stylish, trim, and funny, Windsor enjoyed every moment of her tribute at the university, including Mayor Nutter handing her a miniature, working Liberty Bell and proclaiming Saturday "Edie Windsor Day" in Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
After she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis last spring, Laura Shepler lost her balance and ended up on the floor at least once a week. Once she tripped over her cane and crashed to the floor, cracking her fingers and tearing muscles in her shoulder. Now, she has a furry means of support always by her side. Her service dog, Pumpkin, used to be a family pet. Now, the 3-year-old golden retriever helps make Shepler's life easier by picking up items and using her body and the harness she wears to keep Shepler steady.
NEWS
March 25, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A few years ago, Mount Laurel School Superintendent Antoinette Rath heard a statistic quoted during a conference that pretty much blew her away: In the United States, there are more female truck drivers than female scientists. "I thought, 'Wow,' " Rath recalled. "It hit me between the eyes. " Back in her district, she checked on her own students. It seemed that as the girls went up in the years, their enthusiasm for science slacked off. In class, they participated less. So Rath, who will be honored for her achievements this week, started talking with her staff about how to make science more hands-on, more relevant, more - her word - "alive" for girls as well as boys.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Turmoil continues at Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., which this week tried to dispel a report of company expectations of a dramatic decline in profit for its best-selling drug, and last week was suggested to be a possible takeover target by other drugmakers. On Oct. 30, chief executive officer Jeremy Levin resigned after a dispute with the board of directors, which didn't seem to mind his departure. "In a low-interest-rate environment, Teva is now sitting in a very attractive position for an acquirer," Bernstein Research analyst Ronny Gal wrote in a recent note to clients.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Catie Hamilton and Dr. John Stern, For The Inquirer
She was supposed to be on her way to a neon-lit chapel where an Elvis impersonator waited to officiate at her wedding. Instead, the 27-year-old woman sat in a thin hospital gown on an examining table in a cold emergency room, anxiously waiting for news. A week before, she had gone to see her primary physician. She had been dealing with a series of strange symptoms over the summer. A curious, maddening itch. Achy joints from time to time. Vicious headaches that she supposed were like migraines, although she had never had them before.
NEWS
November 6, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Caring for a seriously ill family member is so all-consuming, Elissa Lewin says, that a person often "forgets to breathe. " That's breathe, as in stop , exhale , and relax - a stress-reducing, health-enhancing, mind-centering pause in the 24/7 flow of full-time caregiving. "Put your pinkie to your navel, and take a belly breath," Lewin, 59, says, as those of us seated around the table at the Colonial Inn at Smithville, Atlantic County, follow the leader. It's the second day of a "Respite Retreat for Men" sponsored by Nancy's House (nancys-house.org)
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Debra Nussbaum, For The Inquirer
Ilene Triest found the group a decade ago while caring for her husband, who had been seriously disabled in a car crash. Bob Mastrogiovanni attended his first group dinner in Cherry Hill in 1992, after a psychologist suggested a support group to help him and his wife, Kathy, handle her multiple sclerosis. Patrice Dupois connected with the Well Spouse Association in 1996, when she was caring for her husband in his early 40s as he was declining quickly with ALS. "I had no life," Triest said of the time she walked into her first Well Spouse dinner meeting in Manalapan, N.J. "I am married but not married.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Harrisburg pharmacist has sued the drugstore chain CVS Caremark in federal court, alleging that the company discriminated against him because he had multiple sclerosis and fired him because he raised safety concerns about CVS's plans to cut staff. In the lawsuit, filed in Harrisburg, Joseph Zorek, 61, said he had worked for the company or its predecessors from 1968 until 2012, when, he said, he was fired. Zorek's suit says CVS violated the American With Disabilities Act for several years when supervisors insisted he use a lift chair not meant for long-term sitting, so that he could see the floor in front of the pharmacy counter.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|