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Mumia Abu Jamal

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NEWS
August 28, 1995
Black men and women who think Mumia Abu-Jamal is a "victim" because of race: Did Daniel Faulkner ask to be killed? Mumia Abu-Jamal is a cold-blooded killer who deserves to die. It's just a shame he can't be executed in the cruel manner that Officer Faulkner was. Lethal injection is too pleasant a death for someone like Mumia. The only way justice could possibly be served would be to take him to 13th and Locust and shoot him between the eyes. TRACY ROST Mullica Hill, N.J. To all inmates at Graterford: You guys want to lighten up on me a bit?
NEWS
September 1, 1995
The official media line coming out of the hearings - reflected in your Aug. 17 editorial - is that no new information has surfaced to indicate Mumia Abu- Jamal's innocence. To prove innocence, however, was not the goal of these proceedings; it was to demonstrate that key elements of the original trial were flawed. Nevertheless, some of the testimony was astounding. We learned that driver's identification papers found in fallen Police Officer Daniel Faulkner's hand belonged to neither Mumia nor his brother, but to a third man who said he had lent them to a fourth.
NEWS
July 23, 1995 | By Marc Kaufman and Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The image of Philadelphia justice plays a central role in the belief of thousands of people across the United States and the world that death-row inmate Mumia Abu-Jamal is innocent and did not get a fair trial. The Philadelphia police who arrested him in 1981 had a reputation, acquired especially during the years in which Frank Rizzo was police commissioner and mayor, for toughness bordering on brutality. Even today, scores of drug convictions are being overturned because Philadelphia police officers planted evidence on innocent people, then lied about it in court.
NEWS
September 8, 1995 | BY GUY ANTHONY
Mayor Rendell and others have referred to support for Mumia Abu-Jamal as a phenomenon of "outsiders" with little support in the Philadelphia area. Most recent to join in this attempt to dismiss the growing call for justice is Daily News staff writer Jim Nolan, whose portrayal of anyone to the left of George Lincoln Rockwell as part of some sort of radical fringe went out with McCarthyism. Nolan's reference to New Yorkers as from "that other country" is reminiscent of the Southern bigots of three decades ago who complained bitterly of "Northern agitators comin' down here to stir things up. " For many Philadelphians, this is a city under siege from within.
NEWS
October 3, 1995
GERINGER OMITS COURT MISCONDUCT IN THE TRIAL OF ABU-JAMAL Dan Geringer's column (Sept. 18) represents a journalistic counterpart to a Mark Fuhrman (of O.J. Simpson trial fame) type detective, who boasted on tape that "you have to get out on the street, learn how to lie, cheat and set people up. " Geringer romanticized Danny and Maureen's blissful life together before Danny was slain by the "convicted murderer Mumia Abu-Jamal," but fails to reveal the significant evidence of malfeasance by court and prosecution throughout Jamal's trial.
NEWS
July 28, 1995
Your misguided editorial on the convicted Marxist-Leninist, Mumia Abu- Jamal, says:"The orchestrated worldwide campaign has generated enough doubt to justify serious consideration of a retrial. " I do not recall reading in our Constitution that trial is now by worldwide approval. Perhaps you would like to amend the Constitution to read that trial shall be best out of five, that if you do not like the verdict, you get a few more passes. I prefer what those "insensitive" founding fathers decided - a trial by a jury of one's peers.
NEWS
August 20, 2010
ANY time the Daily News publishes a reasonably intelligent letter challenging the conviction of Mumia Abu-Jamal, you can expect a small torrent of invective-laden replies that speak to none of the points in question. An example of this is in the "responses" to a July 29 letter from Nathaniel Miller criticizing the mob mentality of those clamoring to "fry Mumia. " Kevin McGrorty ( Aug. 3 ) implores the writer to "be sure you have your facts correct" before writing, but fails to point out any inaccuracies.
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NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - To many Democrats, Debo Adegbile was a renowned voting rights lawyer, the perfect pick to lead the Justice Department's Division of Civil Rights. To Sen. Pat Toomey (R., Pa.) and the Fraternal Order of Police, he was a lawyer who took part in a widespread effort to lionize one of Philadelphia's most notorious criminals, Mumia Abu-Jamal. Because Democrats control the Senate, President Obama had the upper hand. But with a famous cop killer hanging over the vote, Toomey turned Abu-Jamal's celebrity status against him and rounded up Republicans and seven Democrats to block Adegbile's ascent last week.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
DISTRICT Attorney Seth Williams, typically an ardent supporter of President Obama, joined with congressional Republicans yesterday in opposing the nomination of Debo Adegbile to a top Justice Department post. Williams said in a news conference that Adegbile's role in defending convicted cop killer Mumia Abu-Jamal is the crux of why he, too, objects to the nomination. Adegbile was Obama's top pick to head the Justice Department's civil-rights division. He was head of the NAACP's Legal Defense Fund at the time it was fighting against the death penalty for Abu-Jamal.
NEWS
March 7, 2014
THIS TIME, the good guys won. There are a few, so pay close attention. First in line is Sen. Pat Toomey, the pride of Pennsylvania by way of Rhode Island, who exemplified JFK's profile in courage by standing up to President Obama, saying, "You will not force an offensive nominee on the people of this country, and especially not on the people of my state. " The nominee in question was Debo Adegbile, President Obama's choice to head the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari and Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writers
WASHINGTON - Mumia Abu-Jamal, a name that for more than three decades has stirred emotional divisions in Philadelphia and across oceans, was at the center of a stunning defeat for President Obama on Wednesday as the Senate blocked a presidential nominee who had worked on the convicted cop killer's death penalty appeal. By a 52-47 vote, Republicans and eight Democrats blocked a key procedural step in the nomination of Debo Adegbile, a former NAACP lawyer whom Obama had tapped to head the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division.
NEWS
March 5, 2014
The demagoguery of politicians exploiting the 1981 murder of Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner to score points toward their next election is blatant and sickening. Among them is Sen. Pat Toomey, who has joined those vigorously opposing the nomination of civil rights attorney Debo Adegbile to head the U.S. Justice Department's Civil Rights Division. It would be hard to find a better candidate for the position than Adegbile. But Toomey (R., Pa.), Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams, and others say he should be disqualified because he was the NAACP Legal Defense Fund's director of litigation when the organization advocated on behalf of Faulkner's killer, Mumia Abu-Jamal, during appeals of his conviction.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari and Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writers
WASHINGTON - U.S. Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr. (D., Pa.) said Friday he would vote against confirming an Obama administration nominee whose past efforts to overturn the death sentence of convicted cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal have drawn Republican ire. Casey's decision, described in a statement he released late Friday, makes him one of the only Senate Democrats to have publicly opposed lawyer Debo Adegbile as the president's pick to lead the Justice Department's...
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
LAWMAKERS and law enforcers joined forces in Philadelphia yesterday to protest President Obama's nomination of Debo Adegbile - a lawyer who once supervised the defense of notorious cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal - to head the U.S. Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division. "I don't believe he's an appropriate choice for this role," Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., said at a morning news conference at the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5's headquarters in the Far Northeast. Rep. Mike Fitzpatrick, R-Bucks, agreed: "When the president nominated Debo Adegbile to head up a very important role in the Justice Department, to head up all civil rights, he made a mistake.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A day before a key Senate vote on President Obama's nomination of Debo Adegbile to head a key Justice Department post, civil rights leaders moved to defuse opposition based on his link to appeals filed on behalf of Philadelphia cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal. Adegbile is "one of the preeminent civil rights attorneys of his generation," Wade Henderson, president of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, told reporters Wednesday in a news conference. Henderson said opponents of Adegbile's nomination as chief of the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division were using the always-volatile case of Abu-Jamal to "shout down" and "hijack" the nomination.
NEWS
February 5, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
President Obama's nomination to a top U.S. Justice Department post of a lawyer with links to the case of cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal was condemned Monday by Republican U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey and District Attorney Seth Williams, a Democrat. With the Senate Judiciary Committee set to vote Thursday on Debo Adegbile's nomination to head the Civil Rights Division, the two joined Adegbile's opponents. White House officials had no comment on Toomey's opposition or Adegbile's nomination. Toomey and Williams were to have appeared with police officials Monday at Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5 headquarters in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Longtime Sesame Street viewers may remember him as Debo, the little boy who chatted with Grover about the letter S in the 1970s. But to the National Fraternal Order of Police, Debo Adegbile is a civil rights lawyer who "turned the justice system on its head" by providing legal assistance for Mumia Abu-Jamal. The police group is fighting Adegbile's nomination by President Obama to head voter-rights enforcement at the Department of Justice. On Wednesday, U.S. Rep. Mike Fitzpatrick, a Bucks County Republican, sent a letter to Obama calling Adegbile's nomination "a direct affront to the thousands of law enforcement officials who serve in harm's way to protect our families.
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