CollectionsMummers
IN THE NEWS

Mummers

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 14, 1997 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Ronald D. Drais, a hard-core Mummer who lost his legs to diabetes but who kept the strut in his pride and spirit to the end, died Friday of complications of the disease. He was 47 and lived in South Philadelphia. Struck by juvenile diabetes at the age of 14, Ron Drais spent most of his life swimming against the current to live the kind of routine life most people have just by waking up in the morning. He played music on the road for a while and worked at a restaurant as a cook.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / ED HILLE
As far as the Mummers are concerned, troops in the Persian Gulf have earned their stripes - and local support. About 15 clubs, along with local members of the Vietnam Veterans Association, marched in South Philadelphia yesterday, playing patriotic songs and waving banners and flags to show they're behind the troops.
NEWS
January 11, 2016 | Inquirer Editorial Board
If it's a new year in Philadelphia, it must be time to don one's heaviest coat, commit to a chosen self-improvement project, and of course set about the most grueling and predictable rite of all: deconstructing the latest breathtakingly backward minstrelsy of the Mummers. And this was a banner new year - both for raising false hopes of wholesale Mummer enlightenment and for dashing them in eruptions of dark-ages bigotry. Given that said new year is 2016, not 1916, and the place is the polyglot City of Brotherly Love, whatever special public accommodations still accrue to the Mummers shouldn't anymore if they can't purge their ranks of rank displays of hatred.
NEWS
January 4, 1994 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The 1994 Mummers Parade was as much of a hit with TV couch potatoes as it was for fans who took to the streets New Year's Day to cheer on the men and women of Philadelphia Mummery. Ratings this year over 1993 were up 5 percent. "The Mummers parade dominated the ratings for the vast majority of its 12- hour telecast, a tribute to Mummers and their dazzling performances," said George Strimel, executive producer for the Lenfest Group, parade producer. More than 1 million people viewed the parade at home, which translates to a 14.3 rating and a 28 percent share of the audience, according to Neil Harrison of the Weightman Group, which handles parade-related advertising for Lenfest.
NEWS
April 1, 1986
Syracuse, N.Y., had the privilege of being entertained by the Durning String Band of Philadelphia during our annual St. Patrick's Day parade. As a person assigned to help the band while it was here, I must say that it certainly represents the City of Brotherly Love. After spending the entire day with the members, I am even more fanatical about the Mummers bands and plan to attend the New Year's Day parade and, I hope, the Show of Shows next year. Bonnie L. Arnold Baldwinsville, N.Y.
NEWS
December 2, 1991 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Will the New Year's Day parade be televised? Mum is the word. Mummer representatives met last night to try to cobble a last-minute package to offer local stations to get the New Year's Day parade on TV for the 46th year. No one would comment beforehand on the specific agenda or even on where the meeting, which had been scheduled to begin at 8:30, would take place. It was known that all four divisions - string band, fancy, fancy brigade and comic - would be represented.
NEWS
February 5, 1988 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Councilwoman Joan Specter said yesterday that she has rounded up support in City Council to return controversial photographs of Mummers in dark makeup to the current "Art in City Hall" exhibit. But Mayor Goode said that the photographs would have to hang on the fourth floor next to City Council chambers, not next to the mayor's second-floor office. Specter, a Republican, wrote to Goode yesterday to inform him that Council President Joseph Coleman, Councilman Lucien Blackwell and others had agreed to rehanging three photographs by James Conroy in the exhibit of Mummers costumes and related art. Mayor Goode had ordered the photographs out of the exhibit on Dec. 29, calling them "an insult to black people" after Council members objected to one photograph because they thought it looked as if the Mummers were in blackface, a practice outlawed in the parade since 1961.
NEWS
February 13, 2006
REBUTTAL letters by so-called Mummers experts like Al Fuchs who chastise those of us who dare to "critique" the parade telecast and string band presentations are downright comical. I have been following string bands for 40 years and my father and uncle were both members of the winningest string band in parade history. I have witnessed the many intricate changes in music, costuming and drilling. I have listened intently as the sweet early music of the string bands transformed from mostly violins, banjos, guitars, mandolins and glockenspiels to the big-band sound of today complete with 40-plus saxophones.
NEWS
December 24, 1991 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Staff Writer
How's this for a Christmas present? Eight days before their annual New Year's Day parade, some of the Mummers are back on television. It's the latest development in the on-again, off-again saga of the Mummers as they've tried to swing a last-minute deal to get the 1992 parade back on the box. As of last night, the String Bands and Comics were on TV. The Fancy Clubs and Fancy Brigades were not. The announcement was made yesterday that...
NEWS
March 25, 1996 | by Frank Dougherty and Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writers
There's an edge of sadness this week among Philadelphia's traditional makers of mirth. String-band clubs this weekend will play their final rendition of "So Long, It's Been Good to Know You" as they close out their tradition of sponsoring their annual Show of Shows at the Civic Center. "I was in the first show, the 1938 Show of Shows, and I plan to pack in the final extravaganza," recalled Don Keir, a banjo player with the Polish-American String Band. "It was called the Milk Fund back then, a charity event to provide poor children with milk during the days of the Great Depression.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Staff Writer
Into what alien territory has the Democratic Party landed its spaceship this week? Democrats may think Philadelphia is reliably blue, but as for those South Philly blocks that jut right up against the Wells Fargo Center? "It's all Trump here," said Donna Di Bruno, 48, a teacher and a member of the great extended cheese family. She's talking with her neighbors in the shared driveway behind their homes in the 3200 blocks of Broad and Juniper. (Don't call it an alley. They say that makes the neighborhood look bad.)
NEWS
May 21, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, STAFF WRITER
The Roots won't play the free July Fourth concert on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway this year, but the lineup will be decidedly rooted in Philadelphia. The performers may lack the star power of prior years, but most have city ties and aim to create a more patriotic, family-friendly atmosphere, organizers said Friday. Leslie Odom Jr., a star of the Broadway musical  Hamilton  and a native of East Oak Lane, will emcee the featured concert on July 4. Bucks County native Christina Perri will perform, as will Yazz the Greatest, a star of the TV show  Empire ; the Philly Pops; and the rhythm-and-blues band Brotherly Love.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
On Day 100 on the job, Mayor Kenney was running as hard as he has since Day One. Kenney, the longtime city councilman who won the mayoral race last year by double digits, formally greeted an Israeli peace drums steel band in Hebrew on Tuesday morning in City Hall. He was then whisked away by his security detail to the Wells Fargo Center in South Philadelphia for a media tour in preparation for the Democratic National Convention in July. Then it was off to a library party in Southwest Philadelphia before heading back to City Hall to announce the new commissioners for the Fire Department and prison system.
NEWS
February 22, 2016 | By Tricia Nadolny, Staff Writer
As he made his way to the start of the Manayunk parade route Saturday morning - weaving among plumes of feathers, floats, and Mummers tuning their instruments - Tom Loomis could hardly make it two feet without being stopped to shake a hand or give a hug. "It's going to be a great day!" an event organizer in a golf cart yelled at him as she came to a brief stop. "It's going to be a beautiful day," Loomis, president of the Philadelphia String Band Association, said before she sped off. By all accounts, it was. The event, a Mardi Gras celebration with performances from all 17 of the city's string bands, drew an estimated 12,000 to 14,000 people, according to organizers.
NEWS
February 20, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
U.S. Rep. Robert Brady has announced a nonprofit's $8,000 donation to the Manayunk Mummers parade, helping the event to go forward Saturday after donations and sponsorships lagged. Event organizers suspected their fund-raising efforts were hurt by the controversy surrounding the Mummers Parade on New Year's Day, when put-downs of African Americans, Mexicans, gays, and transgender people sparked international headlines. "I feel like the weight has lifted," said Jane Lipton, executive director of the Manayunk Development Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
For Tom Loomis, longtime president of the String Band Association, the best things about the Mummers are family, friendships, fun, and, of course, great music. "It's tradition," said Loomis, who has played in the Woodland String Band since 1977. "My son plays with me, and every year, as we get near City Hall, he'll find me, give me a kiss on the cheek, and tell me he loves me. I still get the chills. " All of those "bests" will be on display Saturday when all 17 string bands parade and perform as part of Mummers Mardi Gras in Manayunk.
NEWS
February 11, 2016
It's only relatively recently that Philly has been made to look cool on film. With some notable exceptions, like last year's Creed, the city has more often than not served as a nameless stand-in for crime dramas or action flicks in need of a grimy postindustrial backdrop. Name that abandoned factory or burned-out block and win a prize. But it's 2016. We're a city on the rise. So it was with much excitement and trepidation that I tuned in to watch the latest episode of the rebooted X-Files on Monday night.
NEWS
February 8, 2016
In keeping with an annual tradition, more than 250 showed up for the 2016 Union League New Year's Day festivities. Packing into the hallowed halls of the Union League, dressed in their holiday finest, were 1,850 Union League officers and members, from grandparents to newborn babies and friends. Festivities included family-fun activities throughout the building, including magicians, jugglers, face painters, balloon sculptors, and a caricature artist. Reserved bleachers were available for the brave who filled first-row seats on Broad Street to watch the Mummers.
NEWS
February 8, 2016 | By Clark DeLeon
Organizers of the Mummers' Feb. 20 promenade down Main Street in Manayunk are concerned about a shortage of sponsors, The Inquirer reported last week, because of negative publicity surrounding skits deemed homophobic or immigrant-unfriendly during last month's parade down Broad Street. Weird, isn't that, to read the words "parade down Broad Street" instead of the traditional march north? The Mummer tradition, more than a century old, was based on the notion that once a year, Philadelphians from working-class neighborhoods had a sacred right and civic duty to march into the hipster-haunted canyons of Center City, past the old-money swells lined up on the dramatic curved stairway of the Union League, and past the disapproving stone visage of Moses the lawgiver staring down from the south portal of City Hall, where the invading neighborhood army suddenly swept left and was greeted by the cheers of thousands of hearty fans in bleachers, all bathed in bright lights awaiting this very moment, a roiling riot of color and joyous motion, a sea of satin umbrellas pumping, of gold-spray-painted work boots strutting in a mad Philadelphia moment below Billy Penn's bronze hat and permanently averted northeastward gaze.
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
Donations and sponsorships have slumped for next month's small, family-friendly Mummers Parade in Manayunk, and organizers fear they know why: The caricatures and put-downs of African Americans, Mexicans, gays, and transsexuals that marred the big New Year's Day parade on Broad Street. "The people we're reaching out to are not saying yes," said Jane Lipton, executive director of the Manayunk Development Corp. "They're saying no in the most polite way. " The second-year parade expected a boost in corporate interest, having proved itself, but has been unable to land a lead sponsor, Lipton and others said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|