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Mummers Parade

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NEWS
January 12, 1995
YO, LIBERALS! GET USED TO IT Liberals, get used to the reality that you lost the election. Why? Because the Democratic Party that once was for all working men is now for those who don't work. Of the Democrats' 42 years of control, the last 30 were by liberals who have created a generation of dependency on government, social programs that encourage people not to work, programs that encourage 12-year-olds to have babies knowing the government will keep them. The taxpayers are fed up with programs that don't work, like welfare and the school loan program (25 percent never paid back, so the taxpayers have to pick up the bill)
NEWS
December 17, 2008 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The city and the Mummers Association will resume talks today on the impact of Mayor Nutter's budget cuts on the traditional New Year's Day parade, after meeting last evening for about 90 minutes. "We're making progress but we ran out of time," said Doug Oliver, Nutter's press secretary. But Mummers Association spokesman George Badey said his organization was disappointed with the city's response. He said that the city was asking the Mummers Association to help pay for costs associated with the parade, but that so far officials have failed to provide a detailed breakdown of what those costs are. "We don't want to be charged for things that aren't related to the parade," Badey said.
NEWS
December 15, 2008 | By Craig R. McCoy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's raucous Mummers Parade appears set to make its annual trek up Broad Street come New Year's Day, but the party will likely run short. Doug Oliver, press secretary for Mayor Nutter, made that prediction yesterday after he met with Mummers leaders to negotiate the impact of the city's budget cuts on the parade. The parade should follow its normal route but probably will be cut back by about 90 minutes, he said yesterday. The bacchanal usually lasts for eight hours, officially.
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | STU BYKOFSKY, Daily News Columnist
THE MUMMERS Parade broke with tradition and marched the "wrong way" on Broad Street on New Year's Day. The (remaining) fans seemed to like it. The crowds were somewhat larger in Center City (which is what happens when you contract the parade route). As a veteran parade watcher and reviewer, I liked it, even knowing the reversal of direction was born out of necessity. Doing everything the "old" way was turning into a funeral procession for this Philadelphia tradition, one that should be embraced.
NEWS
December 31, 2003 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than a century after its birth, Philadelphia's annual Mummers Parade is adapting to a new era. And unlike the old days, when fans watched the parade for hours in frigid New Year's weather, Mummers leaders and city officials said tomorrow's parade is expected to be sunny and speedy - tailor-made for the age of global warming and short attention spans. Of course, they would have a hard time taking credit for weather forecasts that predict bright skies and temperatures in the upper 40s. But according to Philadelphia Managing Director Philip Goldsmith, his office has worked with the Mummers to make this parade significantly shorter than the dragging, gap-filled events that he said had turned off fans in recent years.
NEWS
December 9, 2003 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It wasn't quite two minutes to midnight, but it was pretty close. With just over three weeks left before New Year's Day, a television station has finally agreed to show the Mummers Parade. Under an agreement that was awaiting signatures last night, WPHL-TV (Channel 17) will televise the annual parade live from Broad Street. Long a staple of local television each Jan. 1, the parade had been in danger of being knocked off the air this year. "Once I get some signatures, we'll be all set," WPHL general manager Vincent R. Giannini said.
NEWS
January 5, 1986 | By Edwin Guthman, Editor of The Inquirer
When cops have to move among a crowd of parade watchers and firmly, but with grave courtesy, take beer cans and beer bottles out of the hands of young men and young women, something is haywire. That is what Philadelphia's finest were doing Wednesday as the Mummers strutted up South Broad Street, but don't get me wrong. I'm not criticizing the cops who had to do that, or the brass that ordered them to do so. I just think cops shouldn't have to play nursemaid to a lot of young people.
NEWS
December 23, 1993 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
What are you doing New Year's Day? If you're a Philadelphian, it's likely you'll be doing one of two things: going to the Mummers Parade or watching at least some of it on TV. Most of us prefer to stay home to view. KYW-TV (Channel 3) estimates that more than a million people in nearly 362,000 households did just that last year. (By comparison, 100,000 spectators shivered on windy Broad Street as 20,000 Mummers blew by.) Having guests over during the parade is as much of a tradition as the spectacle itself.
NEWS
July 21, 1994 | By Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It could be a one-year detour, or the shape of things to come. Either way, it's a controversial break in tradition. Come New Year's Day, the Mummers won't be marching up South Broad Street. Instead, they'll be parading on Market Street, from Second Street to City Hall. That's the word from Mayor Rendell, who sent letters last week to groups representing the 20,000 to 25,000 Mummers who join in the annual event. The official reason: South Broad Street, soon to become the "Avenue of the Arts," will be in the midst of a $15 million rebuilding project, due to start this September.
NEWS
December 30, 2001 | By Leonard N. Fleming INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the last 20 years, cold wind and all, Matt Glovacz was always ready to strut up Broad or Market in stunning Mummers finery. The gaudier the costumes, the better the show. But with the Sept. 11 attacks and war on terrorism, Glovacz, captain of the Golden Sunrise Club, said this year's opening act had to be strictly red, white and blue. "This country has to stay united," said Glovacz, 37, of Port Richmond. And so does the parade. From the doling out of Old Glory along the Market Street parade route to dedications to firefighters and the military, patriotism will be strongly represented throughout Philadelphia's 101st New Year's Day revelry.
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NEWS
May 22, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
AT JOSEPH BLASS' funeral, the family got into a discussion about the ranking of his passions. All agreed that family came first. But after that? There was some disagreement about what was second. The Ferko String Band, of which he was past captain, had to be up there. But what about his country? Joe was devoted to the country he had served in fire and death on a bombed ship in the South Pacific in World War II. OK. A compromise was reached. After family, second place in Joe's hierarchy would be divided equally between Ferko and his country, Joseph H. Blass Jr., award-winning captain of the Ferko String Band, whose idea of a great time was to march with the band on Broad Street in the Mummers Parade, blasting away on his saxophone, General Electric toolmaker for 42 years, Navy veteran of World War II, and devoted family man, died May 13. He was 94 and was living in Havertown, but had lived most of his life in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | STU BYKOFSKY, Daily News Columnist
THE MUMMERS Parade broke with tradition and marched the "wrong way" on Broad Street on New Year's Day. The (remaining) fans seemed to like it. The crowds were somewhat larger in Center City (which is what happens when you contract the parade route). As a veteran parade watcher and reviewer, I liked it, even knowing the reversal of direction was born out of necessity. Doing everything the "old" way was turning into a funeral procession for this Philadelphia tradition, one that should be embraced.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cars still were barred from Main Street an hour after the first-ever Mummers Parade in Manayunk concluded. The crowd inside Pitcher's Pub swelled at noon Saturday, and the Pennsport String Band had an idea to engage the revelers. One strut. Outside. Three contestants. Winner collects $100. "Everyone points at me," said Kate O'Reilly, a Mummer's daughter and Manayunk resident. "I say: 'Done. It's in the bag. I dare you.' The rest is history. " There was something different about this intimate Mummers gathering.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
MANAYUNK will be mobbed by Mummers on Saturday when all 17 string bands march down Main Street in the first Philadelphia Mummers Mardi Gras Parade. Postponed last weekend by wintry weather, the free, family-friendly, two-hour parade from Shurs to Green lanes is scheduled to start at 10 a.m. under forecasted cold, sunny skies. The string bands will then serenade and schmooze with fans from noon to 4 p.m. in Manayunk restaurants. A $10 contribution to the cash-strapped Mummers buys a bracelet to all after-parties plus food and drink discounts.
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT BROKE Joe Bryson's heart when he couldn't participate in the last New Year's Mummers Parade. As a former captain of the Bryson New Year's Brigade, Joe lived and breathed the exotic culture of Philadelphia Mummery. "New Year's Day was his favorite day," said his daughter, Colleen Judge. "But he was just out of the hospital and the weather was bad. His doctors said he couldn't go. " But Mummers culture is in Bryson blood, and his fellow paraders knew it. So, on the morning of the parade, they gathered outside Joe's house and serenaded him with some favorite Mummer airs.
NEWS
January 3, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shortly after 10:30 a.m., with the pretzel-eating spectators jammed four deep in front of the Union League, there was an only-in-Philly moment. The Oregon wench brigade was marching up Broad Street from South Philadelphia - a squadron of burly fellows who, despite the pastel frocks, were not really going for the feminine look. Headed the other direction was the LGBT Liaison Committee, which included a half-dozen glittery drag queens - or, as some prefer to be called, female impersonators.
NEWS
January 2, 2015
The 115th edition of the "official," city-overseen Mummers Parade (it had been spontaneous and disorganized before that) yesterday returned to its disorganized roots, which left a lot of people - Mummers, fans and city officials alike - wondering, "How did that happen?" For the first time in 115 years the Mummers broke with tradition and marched south on Broad, starting with judging at City Hall, and ending with a performance at Carpenter, which turned out to be the best place to see the parade.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When I moved to Philadelphia in 1999, I knew I had a great deal to learn: how to navigate from Pashunk to the Skookl, the Boulevard to the Parkway; the right way to order a Yuengling (a lager); and the correct usage of jawn (OK, that I still don't really understand). Now that I've been here, on and off, for 15 years, I'm starting to wonder: Am I a true Phuluffyan yet? Given that I still sometimes order a sub at a hoagie shop, the answer seems to be, "Not quite. " So, 2015 is the year I'll aim to make it official.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
CONSIDERING the supersonic pace of change in today's world, it's comforting that some local traditions endure, especially those indigenous to this time of year. The holiday light show at Macy's in Center City. The Penn's Landing fireworks at 6 p.m. and midnight on New Year's Eve. And, of course, the Mummers march up Broad Street. Well, at least we still have Macy's and the fireworks. But for 2015, our signature New Year's Day extravaganza is moving in a new direction. After more than a century heading north on Broad Street - with but five years of exceptions - the annual cakewalk has changed course.
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Kaminski is broken up. He couldn't keep Trilby on the street, and the oldest name in Mummery is on the brink. The Original Trilby String Band, a troupe that has strummed and strutted annually on New Year's Day since 1898, will not march in this year's Mummers Parade because of a shortage of cash, members, and miracles. "I don't even have words," said Kaminski, 48, who as club captain told members this month he was pulling the plug. There was no chance, he concluded, of mounting a show with unfinished music, no costumes, too few musicians, and but a few props.
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