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Mummers Parade

NEWS
January 3, 2016 | By Dylan Purcell and Erin Arvedlund, STAFF WRITERS
It's a new year, and for the 116th Mummers Parade, perhaps a new era. The iconic Philadelphia celebration Friday featured three new brigades, including two Hispanic performance groups and an African American drill team. One costumed member of the Pirates Wench Brigade, who wouldn't give his name, said he welcomes the new groups and diversity. But he hoped they would adopt the Mummers' history rather than bringing their own. "They're creating a tradition that's not really our tradition," said the man, a veteran of the brigade.
NEWS
January 14, 1986
There have been complaints about the Mummers Parade's length, direction, costs, spectator behavior, how it's televised and its value to the city. The Daily News asked some Philadelphians how they would suggest modifying the Mummers Parade be changed, if at all. Excerpts from some of the responses follow: Paul R. Decker, vice president for tourism, Phila. Convention & Visitors Bureau: The Mummers are invaluable as a means of selling Philadelphia to visitors. Visitors who see the Mummers come back, and tell their friends to visit the city.
NEWS
December 18, 2008 | By DAVID GAMBACORTA & CATHERINE LUCEY, gambacd@phillynews.com 215-854-5994
Yes, Virginia, there will be a Mummer's parade on New Year's Day after all. The Mummers agreed at a meeting last night to strut and strum their way up Broad Street from South Philly to City Hall in just 6 1/2 hours, compared with the usual eight- or nine-hour marathon. The 11th-hour agreement followed weeks of contentious talks between the city and the Mummers. But real sighs of relief were uttered when U.S. Rep. Bob Brady unexpectedly showed up at the meeting, held at the Mummers Museum at 2nd Street and Washington Avenue, and vowed to solve the Mummers' lingering financial problems.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | BY MARY BARR
Many native Philadelphians have suffered life-long conflicting feelings about that annual tradition, the Mummers Parade. A tradition unique to Philadelphia and city-sanctioned since 1901, it has been called "the oldest continuous folk festival in America. " However, the parade has been a bit of an embarrassment in terms of gender and race - the participants are mostly white men, and women have only been allowed to march in recent years. When I moved to 2nd Street above Washington Avenue in 1991, I also was warned of the celebrants attracted by the parade.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Mummers Parade yesterday was a blowout. With predictions of 15- to 20-m.p.h. winds and 35-m.p.h. gusts, representatives from the four divisions of the 90th annual Mummers Parade unanimously agreed early yesterday morning to postpone the traditional New Year's Day strut up Broad Street to Saturday. It marks the 25th time Mother Nature has forced the Mummers to march on another day. Those involved in the 8-0 voice vote to cancel the parade say predictions of high winds and even higher gusts - along with harsh memories of last year's soggy fiasco - proved the deciding factors in the quickly made decision.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1986 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
My Mummers' memories fit amongst one another like the feathers on a Mummer's headdress: Standing at Second and Wolf Streets as a little boy and watching and wondering why my father never wore neat clothes like those guys on the street. Looking out my window in the darkness of a New Year's Day early morning and watching Mummers weave up Wolf Street toward Broad, already insulated against the cold of winter by the warmth of whiskey. Watching the parade at Broad and Passyunk and seeing sons march with fathers, seeing other kids my age going up the street, and my mother explaining that it was too cold, much too cold, to go walking on Broad Street without a hat and mittens.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
CONSIDERING the supersonic pace of change in today's world, it's comforting that some local traditions endure, especially those indigenous to this time of year. The holiday light show at Macy's in Center City. The Penn's Landing fireworks at 6 p.m. and midnight on New Year's Eve. And, of course, the Mummers march up Broad Street. Well, at least we still have Macy's and the fireworks. But for 2015, our signature New Year's Day extravaganza is moving in a new direction. After more than a century heading north on Broad Street - with but five years of exceptions - the annual cakewalk has changed course.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | BY SARA KHAN, Daily News Staff Writer khans@phillynews.com, 215-854-5713
DRAG QUEENS WILL glitz up the next Mummers Parade in Philadelphia. Ten veteran drag performers will join the New Year's Day celebration, each in costumes matching the theme of a Fancy Brigade. "I think it's kind of crazy to be so mainstream now," said Ian Morrison, who handpicked the members of the first "Drag Brigade. " Morrison will participate as his drag alias, Brittany Lynn. He's been performing for 15 years and said that "Philly's come a long way" in terms of LGBT rights.
NEWS
December 22, 1995 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
Broad Street and Washington Avenue would be a great insider's tip as "Best New Place to Watch the Mummers. " But Mayor Rendell spoiled the secret yesterday by calling a press conference at exactly that spot to fluff it up for "the most spectator- friendly Mummers Parade in the history of our great parade. " Rendell, coatless in icy winds that had veteran Mummers bundled up, said he wanted "to make the point that the Mummers Parade is back at its roots, back on Broad Street.
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