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Municipal Government

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NEWS
July 11, 1993 | By Sabrina Walters, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Nicholas Trabosh, Township Council president for the last 17 years, has accepted the position of municipal judge in Berlin Township, a seat left open when Angelo DeCamillo was named to the Camden County Superior Court. "I thought that maybe I'd move up to a state office one day," said Trabosh, 44. Despite the Democrat's nearly two decades in municipal government, Trabosh said he was looking forward to his days on the bench. "I'm excited about becoming a municipal judge.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lower Merion officials have created an Office of Policy and Program Development to keep track of the township's operational efficiency under a newly restructured municipal government. The new office, called OPPD for short, will play a large role in finding ways to generate more revenue and to cut back on expenditures, as well as providing financial forecasts, officials have said. "OPPD was established as an analytical arm of the township," Township Manager David Latshaw said last week, adding that analysts had been hired for the two-person office.
NEWS
August 4, 2006 | By Keith Herbert INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With municipal corruption cases and a brush with bankruptcy behind it, Norristown municipal government seemed to be righting itself in 2006. But that changed Wednesday, when the Norristown council announced that Municipal Manager Paul Janssen was being ousted because of a health insurance contracting error that cost the borough $170,000. Janssen had been on the job in Norristown only since April 2005, earning $117,000 a year. "The difficulties over the insurance certainly entered into the decision," said Council President Bill Procyson.
NEWS
April 15, 1987 | By Arlene Martin, Special to The Inquirer
There were balloons, confetti, placards and posters everywhere. And there were candidates touting their programs and rallying supporters with promises of better cafeteria food, weekend dances and the formation of a coed track team. In a mock election last week, 30 of the 120 children who attend the Haddon Heights Junior School ran for offices ranging from mayor to borough prosecutor. The winners earned honorary positions in the local municipal government - and the chance to participate in real borough meetings.
NEWS
April 2, 1998 | By Melody McDonald, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mayor Jack Luby strolled into his plush office on the third floor of town hall with 17-year-old Kim Pinckney on his heels. "Have a seat," Luby said, motioning to the blue leather chair behind a large, freshly polished mahogany desk. Pinckney turned to the mayor and raised her eyebrows. "In the chair?" she asked, alluding to the seat usually warmed only by mayors of the township. "Yes, in the chair," Luby said, laughing loudly. Pinckney plopped down in the soft seat and ran her hand across a desktop so shiny it glared.
NEWS
April 26, 1994 | By Wanda Motley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph C. Certaine, who has been serving as acting managing director since the resignation of Raymond G. Shipman last month, was named yesterday by Mayor Rendell to fill the post permanently. Certaine, Rendell said, has a wealth of experience in municipal government, dating back 15 years, that qualifies him to oversee the city's daily operations. "Joe knows the government better than anybody in the government," Rendell said. "He understands the complex, difficult relationships between departments, between the managing director's office and between the mayor's office.
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | By Sabrina Walters, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Officials say it'll be tough replacing two longtime administrators scheduled to retire Thursday. John McPeak, finance director/administrator, and Charles Palumbo, solicitor, have announced they will step down after serving Gloucester Township for a combined 40 years. "It's like losing gemstones from your engagement ring," Mayor Ann Mullen said last week. "We'll never be able to replace them. No one will be able to do the work they have done. " McPeak, 70, came to the township in 1975 after leaving a job at an engineering firm.
NEWS
March 14, 2004 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After he graduated from Temple University with a degree in elementary education, Dennis St. John headed to the Betsy Ross Bridge. To be an ironworker. It was what he knew, coming from a family of bricklayers and ironworkers. In fact, it was in high school shop class - he's North Catholic, Class of '66 - that a teacher persuaded him to study education. It turns out that the teacher knew better. St. John left the bridge for 16 years as an educator, including more than nine as administrative principal in Berlin Township, before becoming community activities coordinator for Haddon Township, in 1986.
NEWS
September 6, 1992 | By Tom Halligan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If boxing promoter Don King lived in Yeadon Borough, you can bet he would find a way to telecast the monthly council meetings on pay-per-view. Fight fans would definitely get their money's worth. Ever since the Democrats took the title away from the Republicans in the last election, council members on both sides have laced up the gloves and gone toe-to-toe every first Thursday of the month. The latest bout centers on the qualifications and salary of the newly appointed borough manager, Mary-Rita D'Alessandro.
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard J. DiPrimio, 72, who spent more than 30 years in municipal government, including stints as township manager in Malvern and Marple, died of pneumonia Friday at Bryn Mawr Hospital. He lived in Broomall. Mr. DiPrimio, who was respected as a "people person," served 15 years as manager of Malvern before he retired in 1991. The tenure is considered an unusually long period for township managers, who are appointed and serve at the discretion of commissioners and supervisors. "Richard laid down the groundwork for the revitalization of the central district and the rebuilding of the Malvern Bridge," said Malvern Mayor Domenic Pisano.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
At West Chester's darkest hour, morale was low, streets were deserted by nightfall, and all four corners of the borough's main intersection were vacant. Today, the county seat is a bustling example of redevelopment achieved, with filled storefronts, ample dining and a walkable downtown. Borough Manager Ernie McNeely, who said Wednesday that he would leave the post after 27 years to be the manager in Lower Merion Township, was not only there for the transformation, but also, many say, was a pillar of the process, bringing his unmatched institutional knowledge and always-expanding insight on municipal government to every project.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Within hours of announcing he would run for a third term as Atlantic City's mayor, Lorenzo Langford on Wednesday was again embroiled in a long-distance altercation with Gov. Christie, who said the resort's leader has "no idea what he's doing" and runs the "most God-awful, wasteful" municipal government in the nation. Langford, 57, a Democrat who four years ago vowed that he had made his last run for mayor, fired back via e-mail that Christie's record as governor is "one of hypocrisy.
NEWS
January 24, 2013 | By Sam Hananel, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Union membership plummeted last year to the lowest level since the 1930s as cash-strapped state and local governments shed workers and unions had difficulty organizing new members in the private sector despite signs of an improving economy. Government figures released Wednesday showed union membership declined from 11.8 percent to 11.3 percent of the workforce, another blow to a labor movement already stretched thin by battles in Wisconsin, Indiana, Michigan, and other states to curb bargaining rights and weaken union clout.
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | Washington Post
BEIJING - It takes a lot to faze residents of a city as smog-filled as Beijing. But after four straight days of air so hazardous it has defied government charts and labels, the disbelief and outrage are palpable. Government vehicles have been pulled off the roads, production slowed at thousands of factories, and children told to stay indoors. On Monday, even China's state-run media - which has long avoided criticizing the government on such topics - ran reports and editorials acknowledging the problem and demanding solutions.
NEWS
September 18, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Colwyn, on the edge of Philadelphia, is a tiny place with prodigious fiscal issues, a fractious government, and a police force that has captured national notoriety. Its surreal tax rates are among the highest in the nation, five times higher than those of some wealthier communities in the region. Not a single new home has been built in the borough in at least 15 years. At a time when public money has become ever-scarcer, local-government experts say Colwyn is the kind of town that raises an overwhelming question: What is a place with only 2,500 people doing with its own government?
NEWS
August 7, 2009 | By John Kromer
This summer, two issues have generated disproportionate political heat in Camden: criticism of the salary being paid to Judge Theodore Z. Davis, the city's state-appointed chief operating officer, and disagreements about when state-mandated control of city operations should end. But these controversies are the wrong focus for anyone genuinely interested in restoring competent municipal government to Camden. Instead, now that the law that authorized the state takeover is nearly seven years old, it's time to consider two far more important questions: What has the takeover accomplished?
NEWS
November 25, 2008 | By Jonathan Tamari INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey lawmakers brooded over the latest bad news for the state's pension system yesterday: more than $20 billion in recent investment losses, including $9 billion in October alone. In a hearing held days after a report detailed the damage, lawmakers homed in on a few eyebrow-raising decisions - including an an ill-timed investment in Lehman Brothers shortly before the firm toppled - but they had few solutions for a deepening problem. William Clark, director of the state's Division of Investment, defended the pension system's performance, saying that despite the losses, New Jersey is actually doing better than most states struggling through the nation's economic meltdown.
NEWS
April 13, 2007 | By Bob Martin
As long as it's going on elsewhere, political corruption can be entertaining: the wad of bills in the manila envelope, the paramour enjoying a no-show job, the politician funneling money to himself through a dummy corporation fronting as a vendor. But it ceases to be amusing, as it did for me last week, when corruption is alleged in your own backyard. That's backyard, as in: Haverford Township, my only residence in nearly 21 years in Southeastern Pennsylvania. Commissioner Fred C. Moran, who has represented the township's Fourth Ward longer than I've lived in it. He was charged by a state grand jury last week with bribery, theft and obstruction.
NEWS
August 4, 2006 | By Keith Herbert INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With municipal corruption cases and a brush with bankruptcy behind it, Norristown municipal government seemed to be righting itself in 2006. But that changed Wednesday, when the Norristown council announced that Municipal Manager Paul Janssen was being ousted because of a health insurance contracting error that cost the borough $170,000. Janssen had been on the job in Norristown only since April 2005, earning $117,000 a year. "The difficulties over the insurance certainly entered into the decision," said Council President Bill Procyson.
NEWS
March 14, 2004 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After he graduated from Temple University with a degree in elementary education, Dennis St. John headed to the Betsy Ross Bridge. To be an ironworker. It was what he knew, coming from a family of bricklayers and ironworkers. In fact, it was in high school shop class - he's North Catholic, Class of '66 - that a teacher persuaded him to study education. It turns out that the teacher knew better. St. John left the bridge for 16 years as an educator, including more than nine as administrative principal in Berlin Township, before becoming community activities coordinator for Haddon Township, in 1986.
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