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NEWS
June 5, 1988 | By Lou Perfidio and Ralph Cipriano, Special to The Inquirer
After only five months on the job, Montgomery County District Attorney Michael D. Marino has advanced a radical proposal that he says may amount to political suicide. "If I had any brains at all, I wouldn't even propose this," he said. His idea? A countywide police force. Marino's plan calls for absorbing current municipal police officers into the countywide force and making municipal police chiefs into regional directors, to be overseen by a county police commissioner.
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
After years of delays, Operation Fast Track is off and running. Fast Track, a county-run, drunken-driving processing center, was scheduled to open Friday night in Abington Township. Its debut marks the end of a four- year search for a location in the eastern end of Montgomery County. The county sheriff's office operates the center, which is designed to speed the processing of suspected drunken drivers arrested by municipal police. Area police departments from Cheltenham to Lower Moreland can use the facility, which will be staffed by three county deputies Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights, according to Chief Deputy John T. Hennessey of the sheriff's office.
NEWS
December 17, 1992 | By DAVID J. LAMB
As a result of W. Russell G. Byers's Dec. 4 column, "Time to end the law- enforcement turf-wars," some rectification is needed. Mr. Byers has cited much incorrect information that is defamatory to the SEPTA Police Department and irresponsible to the public. The SEPTA Police Department is not a "security force. " It employs 230 police officers, not 328, does not employ anyone fired from the Philadelphia Police Department and provides far more than a "semblance of protection. " SEPTA police officers are cops in the full sense of that term.
NEWS
December 17, 1988 | By T.J. McCarthy, Special to The Inquirer
There are no accidents on his record. No moving violations. His hair is white. And his address: 18 Reindeer Lane, North Alaska. Yes, Santa Claus has a valid driver's license. The data kept on St. Nick by the National Crime Information Center is sketchy, but it does clear up a few mysteries. According to the computer report, for instance, Santa Claus will be celebrating his 89th birthday this Christmas. Here is the no-nonsense profile of Santa contained in the center's official files: Date of Birth: Dec. 25, 1899 Address: 18 Reindeer Lane, North Alaska Weight: 250 pounds Hair: White Eyes: Blue Status of License: Clear Expiration date: None The startling discovery that even Santa Claus has a paper trail was made recently by some municipal police officers in South Jersey.
NEWS
July 21, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Listen up, aggressive drivers in Pennsylvania. Between now and Aug. 16, police will be targeting - and ticketing - you. Don't even think about running red lights, speeding, tailgating, weaving in and out of traffic, or failing to yield the right of way. Police statewide are mounting a campaign to reduce the number of accidents, injuries, and deaths caused by aggressive driving, officials said Thursday at a news briefing in East Norriton Township....
NEWS
July 30, 2009 | By Liz Wagner INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Montgomery County authorities found what they called a bicycle chop shop at the home of a teenager whom they charged with assault after a confrontation on the Schuylkill River Trail last week ended in gunfire. The boy, a 17-year-old from Norristown who was not identified, was charged yesterday in juvenile court with simple assault and was held pending a disposition hearing. A week earlier, police said, Joseph James DePaul Jr., 27, of Norristown, reported firing six shots from a semiautomatic pistol at two teenagers who he said had harassed and assaulted him on the trail in Plymouth Township.
NEWS
January 20, 1991 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
After almost four years of delays, Operation Fast Track, a drunken-driving processing center, is scheduled to open in Abington next month. Fast Track, a Montgomery County program aimed at speeding up processing of suspected drunken drivers, is expected to open its center on Fitzwatertown Road in the Ardsley section of the township, according to Louis Clewell, Abington Police special projects officer. The proposed site is owned by Abington Township and would be located in a vacant house at the entrance of its municipal sewage plant.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | By Michael Peck, Special to The Inquirer
Why are judges addressed as "honorable"? Does the TV show L.A. Law really show what it's like to be a prosecutor? How can a public defender represent someone he knows is guilty? A panel of judges, lawyers and police chiefs was asked those questions during a Law Day seminar at Gateway Regional High School. The practice of calling judges "honorable" was a custom in English courts, from which the American legal system is descended, said Gloucester County Superior Court Judge John S. Holston Jr. Other English traditions still exist, such as the judge's wearing of black robes, he said.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
An arsenal of legal cases, actuarial figures and gruesome accident photos was unleashed upon Montgomery County police chiefs last Thursday to drive home a single point: While the state's two-year-old seat-belt law saves lives, police will be more inclined to enforce it when they themselves are forced to wear seat belts while on duty. "Law enforcement officers are not going to enforce safety-belt laws until they start wearing them themselves," JoAnn O'Hara, a highway traffic specialist with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, told the group of about 50 chiefs.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 21, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a newspaper in March 2011 first exposed a grand jury investigation into a child sexual-abuse scandal involving Pennsylvania State University, a lone member of the school's board of trustees e-mailed then-president Graham B. Spanier demanding answers. The trustee's effort to get information was revealed in a scathing report on the scandal by former FBI Director Louis Freeh. But the trustee's identity was not disclosed. Penn State subsequently declined a request from The Inquirer to provide the trustee's name.
NEWS
July 21, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Listen up, aggressive drivers in Pennsylvania. Between now and Aug. 16, police will be targeting - and ticketing - you. Don't even think about running red lights, speeding, tailgating, weaving in and out of traffic, or failing to yield the right of way. Police statewide are mounting a campaign to reduce the number of accidents, injuries, and deaths caused by aggressive driving, officials said Thursday at a news briefing in East Norriton Township....
NEWS
July 30, 2009 | By Liz Wagner INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Montgomery County authorities found what they called a bicycle chop shop at the home of a teenager whom they charged with assault after a confrontation on the Schuylkill River Trail last week ended in gunfire. The boy, a 17-year-old from Norristown who was not identified, was charged yesterday in juvenile court with simple assault and was held pending a disposition hearing. A week earlier, police said, Joseph James DePaul Jr., 27, of Norristown, reported firing six shots from a semiautomatic pistol at two teenagers who he said had harassed and assaulted him on the trail in Plymouth Township.
NEWS
May 13, 2009 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State police say they are investigating whether some municipal officers cheated on a routine recertification exam administered in late February. Maj. John Gallaher, who heads the state Municipal Police Officers' Educational and Training Commission, said he could not estimate when the investigation might conclude, or provide any details. "The investigation has to run its course," he said. Police sources said that at least a dozen officers, mainly in Delaware County, received letters advising them of the probe.
NEWS
November 30, 2004 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A fatal accident over the weekend has reignited controversy over the use of radar by local police departments. West Goshen Township Police Chief Michael J. Carroll said yesterday that radar is crucial to preventing the kind of four-vehicle crash that claimed two lives on Saturday evening. State Rep. Richard Allen Geist (R., Blair), who heads the House Transportation Committee, said reworking state law to allow municipal police departments to use radar is not as simple as it sounds.
NEWS
March 5, 2003 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sha-Vell Woodard-Hilliard had finished her Saturday evening shift at Wendy's and was headed to her sister's birthday party. She just needed to get across the Black Horse Pike, to the bus stop on the other side. The 17-year-old high school senior did what people on foot here tend to do: She darted across. Only she didn't make it. Struck by a hit-and-run driver in October, Sha-Vell joined four other pedestrians who have died trying to maneuver the Gloucester County section of the pike in the last year, according to municipal police reports.
NEWS
December 24, 2000 | By Adam L. Cataldo, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
One night about a year ago, a police officer rushed a person suffering from cardiac arrest to Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden. Despite the efforts of cardiologist Reginald Blaber and others, the patient did not survive. As Blaber was thinking about the all-too-common occurrence of people dying after going into cardiac arrest, he asked the police officer who had brought in the patient one question: Would he want a machine that could have helped him save that person's life?
NEWS
December 6, 2000 | By Angela Valdez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Monday morning, just hours after her birth, a girl was abandoned on the steps of an apartment in Union City, N.J. Cradled in a T-shirt inside a plastic shopping bag, the infant lay on the steps, exposed to freezing temperatures, until a resident picked up the bundle and heard a cry. Hours later, Antonia Lima, 39, was arrested and charged with abandonment and endangerment. Her charges could be upgraded to negligent manslaughter if her 6-pound, 4-ounce infant, now on a respirator and in critical condition, dies.
NEWS
October 28, 1998 | By David Cho, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In a department afflicted by high employee-turnover rates and low salaries, Burlington County Sheriff Gary Daniels, a Republican, will face off against one of his own subordinates in Tuesday's election. Not that the Democratic challenger, Sgt. Kenneth Phillips, doesn't respect his boss - in fact, he voted for Daniels in the last sheriff's election. But a disgruntled Phillips said that his suggestions for improvement had been too long ignored by superiors and that the Sheriff's Office was in need of change - a mantra of past candidates who tried, in vain, to topple the decades-long GOP hold on the sheriff's seat and its salary (currently $74,200)
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