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Mural Arts Program

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NEWS
May 21, 2000
When violence strikes a family Our mural, "Families Are Victims, Too," in the 1300 block of South 50th Street, is like no other in the city. It makes a statement about an ongoing crisis facing our city. People talk about "closure" when it comes to the death of a loved one. But for most people, there is no closure. When you love people and you lose them, you miss them. They do not have to be famous to be remembered. This mural speaks of "awareness. " Children can learn from it: "Oh, I remember him. He was so young.
NEWS
August 17, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Mural Arts Program has received a $500,000 matching grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to help fund a program assisting those suffering from behavioral, addiction, and mental health problems. The grant, given to the program's nonprofit fund-raising unit - the Philadelphia Mural Arts Advocates - will support the ongoing Porch Light Initiative, which focuses on three North Philadelphia communities. According to a Mural Arts Program statement, the arts agency will work with the city Department of Behavioral Health and Mental Retardation Services to draw clients into art-based community projects.
NEWS
April 29, 2014 | By Julie Xie, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Early last year, a Berlin artist and a Philadelphia curator boarded an Amtrak train at 30th Street Station for the sole purpose of looking out the window. From the train, artist Katharina Grosse and Elizabeth Thomas, curator of the city's Mural Arts Program, scoped out abandoned warehouses, railroad trestles, and patches of grass and trees that would be the appropriate canvas for their public art idea. The result: seven sites that include buildings and nature in a five-mile stretch between 30th Street and North Philadelphia stations that will be spray-painted to become part of a work they've titled psychylustro . "The work is meant to be a landscape of the mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Unless you've been doing field research in Antarctica, you've probably heard that this is the 30th anniversary of Philadelphia's community-engagement juggernaut, the Mural Arts Program. It's being celebrated with a show at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, a lavish coffee-table book, symposia, and a greater-than-usual deluge of media coverage. Not that the murals have ever been something Philadelphians could ignore. During those three decades, the city agency has left its mark on some 3,600 walls, mostly in the bleaker corners of the city where a little paint isn't the worst thing that can happen.
NEWS
May 2, 2005 | By Rory Sweeney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Albert Einstein wrote, "Imagination is more important than knowledge. " In this, the World Year of Physics, celebrating Einstein's impact on science, the Philadelphia School District is taking the physicist's advice. This year, the district began a five-year collaboration with the city's Mural Arts Program to paint 100 public school walls, 20 each year. In a district already burdened with basic educational needs, the commitment to art education is a surprising shift. Still, supporters say, the benefits of art outweigh the program's cost, which will be at least $300,000 a year.
NEWS
June 16, 2010 | By Nicole Lockley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ever wonder about that mural at 707 Chestnut St., with the three medallions hanging from the young man's neck? And is it really completely made of tiles? Have you questioned why the mural featuring Abraham Lincoln on the corner of Eighth and Ranstead Streets is split into three sections? Inquiring minds now have the opportunity to learn about more than a dozen of the city's murals. All you need is a digital audio player or a cell phone. Podcast and cell phone tours are the new interactive way of bringing to life Philadelphia's pioneering, one-of-a-kind murals.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Murals in Philadelphia have been created, variously, to uplift underserved communities, honor local leaders, fight blight, and amplify grassroots causes. Now, in a swath of the city's Callowhill area, they're advancing a new goal: rebranding a neighborhood. Artists commissioned by the city's Mural Arts Program are installing nine permanent and temporary murals that, collectively, create a revolving outdoor gallery billed as "Spring Arts District. " That also happens to be the identity that developer Craig Grossman, who sought and partially funded the project, is trying to cultivate in this gentrifying stretch between Eighth and 12th, from Noble to Spring Garden Streets.
NEWS
July 7, 2016 | By Lauren Feiner, STAFF WRITER
On a secluded street in South Philadelphia, an unusual duo of crime-fighters hopes to fend off night lurkers. Mural artist David Guinn and lighting designer Drew Billiau have combined their talents on "The Electric Street," an illuminated neon mural on Percy Street between Reed and Wharton, down the block from the iconic cheesesteak spots Pat's and Geno's, in an alleyway hidden by the unusual curve of the block. Low-energy flexineon LEDs bend with the curve of the paint on the 30-by-15-foot wall spanning the backs of two residences.
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | BY MICHAEL MACFEAT
ALTHOUGH IT is great to see the Daily News endorse the work of a living Philadelphia artist, the photographer Zoe Strauss, the most interesting part of this article is that the Daily News shares the concerns regarding the Mural Arts Program put forth a decade ago by the Heretical Society, which was an independent artists' organization that provided a critique of the culture industry in Philadelphia, and which disbanded in 2001. The final statement of the Daily News editorial is very similar to the last line of the Heretical Society tract, the essay "No More Ugly Murals.
NEWS
June 15, 2010 | By Nicole Lockley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you've passed Broad and Vine streets recently, you may have noticed that there's something different about the enormous mural there. It's being painted over. The Mural Arts program is restoring the "Evolving Face of Nursing" mural for the third time in twenty years. The cost of restoration: a little less than $300,000. Sponsors include the Independence Foundation, Bayada Nurses, Connelly Foundation, and Drexel University College of Nursing and Health Professions. The new mural will feature portraits of student and working nurses from area nursing schools and hospitals.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2016 | By Erin Moran, STAFF WRITER
During Pope Francis' visit last year to Philadelphia, lifelong residents got to experience the city in a brand-new way - with open streets . Following "Pope Weekend," many Philadelphians, including a group called Open Streets PHL , called for another an opportunity to open the streets to cyclists, pedestrians, backyard ball players, and others. Now, nearly a year later, Philadelphia on Saturday will host Philly Free Streets . "Philly Free Streets is an exciting opportunity to see Philly in a different way," said Clarena Tolson, the city's deputy managing director for transportation and infrastructure.
NEWS
August 6, 2016 | By Alexandra Villarreal, Staff Writer
"Caryn Kunkle is off the deep end," sighed former Gov. Ed Rendell, head of the Democratic National Convention host committee. He was reacting to accusations by Kunkle, CEO of the arts advocacy site ArtJawn.com, that the artists who painted the DNC donkeys were misled in their contracts. Fifty-seven fiberglass donkeys have romped around Philadelphia since July 1, each representing a state or territory. The initiative, Rendell's brainchild, was funded by the host committee. ArtJawn and the Mural Arts Program sorted through applications.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Chris Hepp, Staff Writer
Oh, the woes of an unwanted Democratic donkey. Imagine being abandoned by New York, of all places. More understandable might be rejection by Guam, American Samoa, or even Connecticut, but the Empire State? The bluest of blues, birthplace of Franklin Delano Roosevelt and home to Hillary Clinton? In the end, it is all the same for four spurned fiberglass burros that were part of the herd of 57 scattered about Philadelphia to promote last week's Democratic National Convention. They won't be going home, their delegations unwilling to pay their shipping costs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Murals in Philadelphia have been created, variously, to uplift underserved communities, honor local leaders, fight blight, and amplify grassroots causes. Now, in a swath of the city's Callowhill area, they're advancing a new goal: rebranding a neighborhood. Artists commissioned by the city's Mural Arts Program are installing nine permanent and temporary murals that, collectively, create a revolving outdoor gallery billed as "Spring Arts District. " That also happens to be the identity that developer Craig Grossman, who sought and partially funded the project, is trying to cultivate in this gentrifying stretch between Eighth and 12th, from Noble to Spring Garden Streets.
NEWS
July 7, 2016 | By Lauren Feiner, STAFF WRITER
On a secluded street in South Philadelphia, an unusual duo of crime-fighters hopes to fend off night lurkers. Mural artist David Guinn and lighting designer Drew Billiau have combined their talents on "The Electric Street," an illuminated neon mural on Percy Street between Reed and Wharton, down the block from the iconic cheesesteak spots Pat's and Geno's, in an alleyway hidden by the unusual curve of the block. Low-energy flexineon LEDs bend with the curve of the paint on the 30-by-15-foot wall spanning the backs of two residences.
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Vibha Kannan, STAFF WRITER
A team of donkey doctors is on standby, Ed Rendell said Thursday, pointing to a sparkling, blue-and-green donkey bearing the painted label "COLORADO" in front of the Union League of Philadelphia. The former governor wasn't kidding. The Colorado donkey is one of 57 fiberglass donkeys unveiled Thursday in honor of July's Democratic National Convention. And if the material breaks or if someone decides to deface a donkey, experts will be on hand to handle it. The "Donkeys Around Town" installation is presented by the Mural Arts Program, the convention's host committee, and the arts group ArtJawn.
NEWS
July 1, 2016 | By Alexandra Villarreal, Staff Writer
On a sun-drenched Philadelphia day, Lynnette Shelley settled outside a warehouse at the Tioga Marine Terminal, paintbrush in hand. The warehouse didn't allow for much natural light, and to finish her masterpiece on the sixth day (on the seventh, she rested), she needed to see its vivid colors and make sure they matched. She touched up images of flora and fauna, and complex geometric patterns, until her donkey was resplendent. Let's backtrack a bit. On Friday, in celebration of the Democratic National Convention, 57 fiberglass donkeys are coming to town, courtesy of the Philadelphia 2016 Host Committee, the city Mural Arts Program, and ArtJawn.
NEWS
June 22, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
The flags along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway have started to fray. The sidewalks around the Convention Center are showing cracks. And Center City construction sites block sidewalks along main pedestrian routes. A little more than a month out from the July 25-28 Democratic National Convention, it's time to tidy up. With that in mind, the convention's host committee over the last few months has deployed a crew of volunteers to canvass the areas around the Convention Center and the Wells Fargo Center.
NEWS
May 29, 2016
Grit The Power of Passion and Perseverance By Angela Duckworth Scribner. 352 pp. $16.80 Reviewed by Tommy Rowan Imagine that: a Philadelphia psychology professor setting the education world on fire with a one-syllable noun that just happens to define the city she currently calls home. Angela Duckworth deserves all credit for her recent rise to Gladwellian heights - but we do hope the punks who still view Philadelphians only as Santa-pelting-snowball-throwers can order this book for next-day delivery.
NEWS
May 14, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
Art is bringing together on one enormous canvas what Cold War-era hatreds had kept apart for more than a half-century. Within the artwork's borders, the Betsy Ross House is depicted in the same imagined neighborhood as the Hotel Dominica of Cárdenas, where Cuba's flag first flew in 1850. The Phillies logo is emblazoned beside the emblem of the Crocodiles, a Cuban national team. The towers of the Ben Franklin Bridge sprout palm trees, while a tocororo, Cuba's national bird, perches on a cable.
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