FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 24, 2010
Location: Media Armory (beneath Trader Joe's), 12 East State St., Media Hours: Thursday through Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m. Admission: Free Call 610-566-0788 to schedule a group or school tour. Visit for more information or to make a donation to the museum.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | Special to The Inquirer / JOHN SLAVIN
The Please Touch Museum's Traveling Trunk Show came to the Willow Grove Park mall Tuesday morning as part of the mall's "Make the Most of Your Morning" program, which runs every Tuesday from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
The Business Partners Program at the James A. Michener Art Museum is 43 members strong and growing as it enters its second year. Most of the members are small businesses that have donated $250, $500 or $1,500. "In the wake of cutbacks in government funding, it's very important to acknowledge and be grateful to the private sector," said Linda Milanesi, public-relations director for the Doylestown Borough museum. "Businesses are providing for the arts a lifeline for survival.
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | by Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is temporarily closing its Museum of American Art on North Broad Street to spiff up and modernize the 1871 structure. The Annual Student Exhibition, opening tomorrow, will be the last public show. Renovation is due to begin May 28, the day after the student show closes, with the public reopening tentatively set for Nov. 11. The grand structure will be made more user-friendly, both in its public spaces and behind the scenes. Plans include a new museum cafe, as well as entrance lobby and orientation center, plus expansion of the museum's popular gift shop.
NEWS
August 4, 1991 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteers inside the distinctive two-story Georgian Revival building at 11 Veterans Square in Media are working feverishly these days at "accessioning. " In the language of museums, the term means writing descriptions, assigning numbers and cataloguing exhibit materials, of which the Delaware County Institute of Science, the building's owner and occupant, has thousands, maybe millions. The institute was founded in 1833, according to its bylaws, "to promote the study and diffusion of general knowledge and the establishment of a museum, and to serve as a nonprofit organization for the people of Delaware County and adjoining areas.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
If only the canteen could talk. Although the dark oak container looks inconsequential next to the original Declaration of Independence, it carries the inscription, "Carried at the Battle of the Brandywine. " The date: Sept. 11 - of the year 1777. In other words, it's a big deal. So are thousands of other artifacts - including a fowling firearm carved from curly maple; Washington's tents at Valley Forge; a list of soldiers from Massachusetts, some barely old enough to shave - destined for display at the Museum of the American Revolution, slated to open in Old City in 2015.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
The Oneida Nation of New York was an early ally of George Washington's Continental Army, so it's entirely fitting that the nation now comes to the aid of raising a Philadelphia museum exploring the struggle for American independence.   Two centuries ago, the Oneida brought bushels of corn to starving troops at Valley Forge. Today, they're bringing millions of dollars — in the form of a $10 million grant announced last week at an event in Washington, cheered by officials of the American Revolution Center, the group that is developing the Museum of the American Revolution at Third and Chestnut Streets.
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rosenbach Museum and Library has accused its former director of misappropriating more than $250,000 worth of rare letters and manuscripts, and of selling them to a Massachusetts autograph dealer. In a civil complaint filed Wednesday, the museum alleged that Clive E. Driver, former director of the Rosenbach and now an art consultant living in Massachusetts, had for two years systematically purloined at least 30 letters written by Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and other famous Americans.
NEWS
April 25, 2013 | Dan Balz, Washington Post
DALLAS - There are twisted girders from the twin towers of the World Trade Center, the bullhorn that former President George W. Bush used from atop the pile of rubble at Ground Zero in New York, an exact replica of his Oval Office, even his collection of signed baseballs. The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, on the campus of Southern Methodist University, will be dedicated Thursday morning. The ceremony will include President Obama and all of the living former presidents.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Christopher Weber and Alicia Chang, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - It was supposed to be a slow but smooth journey to retirement, a parade through city streets for a shuttle that logged millions of miles in space. But Endeavour's final mission turned out to be a logistical headache that delayed its arrival to its museum resting place by about 17 hours. After a 12-mile weave past trees and utility poles that included thousands of adoring onlookers, flashing cameras, and even the filming of a TV commercial, Endeavour arrived at the California Science Center Sunday to a greeting party of city leaders and other dignitaries that had expected it many hours earlier.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Low-income Pennsylvania residents will be able to gain low-cost admission to 17 of the region's biggest and most popular museums and cultural sites, thanks to a program to be announced Tuesday. The program, dubbed ACCESS Admission, will provide $2 admission for all holders of Pennsylvania ACCESS cards, electronic cards used for dispensing Medicaid benefits, food stamps, and other services. Each ACCESS card can be used by families of up to four, at $2 per family member; approximately 480,000 residents with ACCESS cards are eligible, according to officials.
NEWS
September 20, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Liberty is not free. It's fragile, and it occasionally needs to be updated. To that end, Old City's National Liberty Museum on Thursday unveiled a new welcome center that bridges the gap between its exhibits and the concepts it promotes. Since 2000, it has been tasked with conveying a lofty ideal - "liberty" - in a historical district flush with museums, national landmarks, and other attractions. Gwen Borowsky, the museum's CEO, said the Welcome to Liberty Gallery would help visitors understand the museum's mission.
NEWS
September 14, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Local aviation enthusiasts are setting their sights high with a proposed renovation of the Wings of Freedom museum in Horsham, hoping that it could someday rival the Smithsonian's Air and Space Museum. The designs, unveiled Friday at a fund-raiser in Blue Bell, call for a $24 million, green-certified campus to replace the existing museum. The planes now displayed on the lawn would move inside an all-glass exhibit hall. A circuitous, multilevel viewing path would showcase the planes from above and below.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
A program introduced last year to provide free access to Philadelphia museums for city high school students has proved such a success it is being expanded and extended. More than 11,000 students participated in last year's program, called STAMP (Students at Museums in Philly), administered by the Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance - more than 10 times the projected participation. Under the program, a dozen of the city's biggest and most popular museums offered free admission and other programs geared toward young people.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
That an expansive exhibition of work by painter Charles Burchfield is about to open at a Philadelphia-area museum is not an everyday event. Burchfield, who died in 1967, may not be well known here - he lived in Ohio and upstate New York - but he is considered one of the finest watercolorists ever to ply the trade in North America. "Breathtaking," wrote critic Christopher Knight of a 2009 Burchfield exhibition in Los Angeles. For Philadelphia, the exhibition is certainly welcome because it is unusual.
NEWS
August 9, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
Buried in the soil outside the Indian King Tavern museum in Haddonfield are remains from more than a century ago. Among things retrieved so far: broken pieces of glass goblets and pottery and an old coin drilled through the middle, all discarded there in the underbelly of a long-gone addition to the building. Those shards of history, inside buried brick walls, lay untouched until last month, when an excavation crew of high school students and other local volunteers as well as professional archaeologists began work on the site.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By William Ecenbarger, For The Inquirer
  SHILLINGTON, Pa. - With a fresh coat of white paint and a green moat of surgically cropped lawn, the house where John Updike grew into adolescence sits prettily along a busy road in this suburb of Reading. But inside is the detritus of renovation-in-progress - bare floorboards, stripped walls, paint cans, bent nails, wood splinters, patches of wallpaper - covered in dust. "These things take time," sighs Maria Mogford, curator of the John Updike Childhood Home. "We wanted it to be ready this fall, but ... it has a way to go. " When it opens, probably next year, the site will join childhood residences-turned-museums of other famed American authors.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2014 | By Zoë Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
While hundreds of thousands of visitors walk through the Philadelphia Museum of Art each year, drawn in by its world-class collections or the cultural mythos of the Rocky films, Sonya Cobb's debut novel, The Objects of Her Affection , explores a part of the museum that few people ever see: the administrative offices. A balance between writing what you know and dramatic exaggeration, Objects (by a former Philadelphia mom with a museum curator husband) tells the story of Sophie Porter, a freelance web developer and mother of two in Philly whose husband, Brian, is a curator at the Art Museum.
NEWS
August 7, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Alongside the atrocities were the people who should have stopped them. The images of the police who participated in the crimes of Nazi Germany, frozen in time at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, haunted Charles H. Ramsey when he first visited nearly two decades ago as chief of Washington police. On Tuesday, Ramsey sent 75 Philadelphia police recruits to see the same images. Now Philadelphia police commissioner, he wanted the trainees to learn about guarding the rights promised by the Constitution, about the sacred relationship with the people they will protect, and about how disastrous the results can be when police lose sight of those priorities.
NEWS
August 2, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Museum of Art has received a $5 million grant from the state to help fund $150 million to $160 million in major renovations and upgrades to the main building and its nearly 500,000 square feet of interior space. The renovations are a critical part of a long-planned transformation and expansion, which ultimately will include new gallery spaces beneath the museum terrace at the end of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The state funds, however, will not go toward creation of any new galleries - under the terrace or within the museum - nor will they help create a new museum education center.
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