FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 24, 2010
Location: Media Armory (beneath Trader Joe's), 12 East State St., Media Hours: Thursday through Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m. Admission: Free Call 610-566-0788 to schedule a group or school tour. Visit for more information or to make a donation to the museum.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | Special to The Inquirer / JOHN SLAVIN
The Please Touch Museum's Traveling Trunk Show came to the Willow Grove Park mall Tuesday morning as part of the mall's "Make the Most of Your Morning" program, which runs every Tuesday from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
The Business Partners Program at the James A. Michener Art Museum is 43 members strong and growing as it enters its second year. Most of the members are small businesses that have donated $250, $500 or $1,500. "In the wake of cutbacks in government funding, it's very important to acknowledge and be grateful to the private sector," said Linda Milanesi, public-relations director for the Doylestown Borough museum. "Businesses are providing for the arts a lifeline for survival.
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | by Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is temporarily closing its Museum of American Art on North Broad Street to spiff up and modernize the 1871 structure. The Annual Student Exhibition, opening tomorrow, will be the last public show. Renovation is due to begin May 28, the day after the student show closes, with the public reopening tentatively set for Nov. 11. The grand structure will be made more user-friendly, both in its public spaces and behind the scenes. Plans include a new museum cafe, as well as entrance lobby and orientation center, plus expansion of the museum's popular gift shop.
NEWS
August 4, 1991 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteers inside the distinctive two-story Georgian Revival building at 11 Veterans Square in Media are working feverishly these days at "accessioning. " In the language of museums, the term means writing descriptions, assigning numbers and cataloguing exhibit materials, of which the Delaware County Institute of Science, the building's owner and occupant, has thousands, maybe millions. The institute was founded in 1833, according to its bylaws, "to promote the study and diffusion of general knowledge and the establishment of a museum, and to serve as a nonprofit organization for the people of Delaware County and adjoining areas.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
The Oneida Nation of New York was an early ally of George Washington's Continental Army, so it's entirely fitting that the nation now comes to the aid of raising a Philadelphia museum exploring the struggle for American independence.   Two centuries ago, the Oneida brought bushels of corn to starving troops at Valley Forge. Today, they're bringing millions of dollars — in the form of a $10 million grant announced last week at an event in Washington, cheered by officials of the American Revolution Center, the group that is developing the Museum of the American Revolution at Third and Chestnut Streets.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
If only the canteen could talk. Although the dark oak container looks inconsequential next to the original Declaration of Independence, it carries the inscription, "Carried at the Battle of the Brandywine. " The date: Sept. 11 - of the year 1777. In other words, it's a big deal. So are thousands of other artifacts - including a fowling firearm carved from curly maple; Washington's tents at Valley Forge; a list of soldiers from Massachusetts, some barely old enough to shave - destined for display at the Museum of the American Revolution, slated to open in Old City in 2015.
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rosenbach Museum and Library has accused its former director of misappropriating more than $250,000 worth of rare letters and manuscripts, and of selling them to a Massachusetts autograph dealer. In a civil complaint filed Wednesday, the museum alleged that Clive E. Driver, former director of the Rosenbach and now an art consultant living in Massachusetts, had for two years systematically purloined at least 30 letters written by Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and other famous Americans.
NEWS
April 25, 2013 | Dan Balz, Washington Post
DALLAS - There are twisted girders from the twin towers of the World Trade Center, the bullhorn that former President George W. Bush used from atop the pile of rubble at Ground Zero in New York, an exact replica of his Oval Office, even his collection of signed baseballs. The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, on the campus of Southern Methodist University, will be dedicated Thursday morning. The ceremony will include President Obama and all of the living former presidents.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Christopher Weber and Alicia Chang, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - It was supposed to be a slow but smooth journey to retirement, a parade through city streets for a shuttle that logged millions of miles in space. But Endeavour's final mission turned out to be a logistical headache that delayed its arrival to its museum resting place by about 17 hours. After a 12-mile weave past trees and utility poles that included thousands of adoring onlookers, flashing cameras, and even the filming of a TV commercial, Endeavour arrived at the California Science Center Sunday to a greeting party of city leaders and other dignitaries that had expected it many hours earlier.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shirley Dumas and Ruby Little, sisters in their 70s, circled the exhibit at the African American Museum in Philadelphia, recognizing symbols of their youth. The cows, seeds, dirt roads, and sheds - intertwined and rendered in graphite and clay - triggered memories of their North Carolina childhood on the family farm. "We used to grow tobacco, cotton, sweet potatoes - everything," said Dumas, 73, of Mount Gilead, N.C. "It shows you how things were a long time ago. " Dumas and her sister, visiting Philadelphia for a family reunion, chatted with artist Syd Carpenter, whose 15-piece exhibit, "More Places of Our Own," aims to memorialize families like those of the sisters who worked the land, often anonymously.
NEWS
July 12, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
After more than a year of radiographic and electron microscope analyses, acid washes, hand filing and scraping, heating, archival research, fussiness, and hand wringing, the Philadelphia Museum of Art has at last unveiled its newly resplendent statue Diana . She again looks out over the Great Stair Hall, seen as she has never been seen before in Philadelphia - or anywhere else, for that matter. Dressed now in a cloak of deliberately muted gilt, the goddess of the hunt glows atop the staircase, set in an alcove washed with new lighting, golden as the sunlight that flooded the soaring hall Thursday morning.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE USS PASADENA slammed through some of the toughest battles in the South Pacific in World War II. The light cruiser earned six battle stars in engagements against Luzon and Formosa, covered landings for the bitter battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, then hammered military and industrial targets on the Japanese coast in anticipation of an invasion. And Bud Hendrick was there. The invasion never happened, of course. The Japanese surrendered on Aug. 14, 1945, after two atomic bombs destroyed Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
NEWS
June 28, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The celebrated architect Frank Gehry, who at 85 is just one year younger than the Philadelphia Museum of Art, visited the city Thursday to kick off a special exhibition detailing his plans for expanding the iconic museum building. While he has worked on the project for a decade, the museum is only now unveiling the design, which involves carving out a block-size space under the east terrace to create a new wing of galleries. Most of the improvements will be out of public view, except for two controversial proposals.
NEWS
June 15, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
Children, one of them draped with a real stethoscope, moved around pieces of a puzzle depicting a full-body X-ray on a backlit table. A friendly looking patient - a doll - lay nearby. A bright-red model ambulance and a model helicopter stood at the ready. And on a wall was a map of the skeletal system. That was the scene at the Garden State Discovery Museum in Cherry Hill on Friday morning as it opened an exhibit intended to take the dread out of children's visiting a hospital or emergency room.
NEWS
June 11, 2014
Within days of the 70th anniversary of the pivotal D-Day landings, it's fitting that the planned Museum of the American Revolution is about to secure another objective in its march to create the nation's first museum devoted exclusively to exploring the armed struggle for colonial America's independence. Having raised fully 90 percent of their construction budget, museum officials expect to break ground in the fall at a prime location at Third and Chestnut Streets, in the city's historic district.
NEWS
June 7, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
South Third Street is kind of a mess these days. Demolition of the burned-out Suit Corner store at Market Street is proceeding fairly quickly. Demolition of the old Independence Park visitor center at Chestnut Street - not so quickly. "They really built that tower well," said Michael Quinn, head of the Museum of the American Revolution, referring to the building's 130-foot-high square bell tower. "It's concrete, full of rebar. The brick is only a veneer. " The visitor center, though, has got to go, and Quinn is certain that his museum, as yet a set of drawings, blueprints, and PowerPoint presentations, is on the cusp of construction.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposal to convert the historic watchcase building in Riverside into apartments was rolled out Tuesday before the township Planning Board, which may vote on the project this summer. Township Administrator Meghan Jack said Simshabs Partners gave a presentation to the board but still needed to provide more details on how 64 apartments will be carved out of the seven-story building and on where parking spaces will be. She said the next meeting was tentatively scheduled for July 17. Simshabs Partners, based in Brooklyn, has an agreement of sale to buy the building on Pavilion Avenue from an engineering firm that bought it in 1988 and that occupies the first floor.
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