FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 24, 2010
Location: Media Armory (beneath Trader Joe's), 12 East State St., Media Hours: Thursday through Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m. Admission: Free Call 610-566-0788 to schedule a group or school tour. Visit for more information or to make a donation to the museum.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | Special to The Inquirer / JOHN SLAVIN
The Please Touch Museum's Traveling Trunk Show came to the Willow Grove Park mall Tuesday morning as part of the mall's "Make the Most of Your Morning" program, which runs every Tuesday from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
The Business Partners Program at the James A. Michener Art Museum is 43 members strong and growing as it enters its second year. Most of the members are small businesses that have donated $250, $500 or $1,500. "In the wake of cutbacks in government funding, it's very important to acknowledge and be grateful to the private sector," said Linda Milanesi, public-relations director for the Doylestown Borough museum. "Businesses are providing for the arts a lifeline for survival.
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | by Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is temporarily closing its Museum of American Art on North Broad Street to spiff up and modernize the 1871 structure. The Annual Student Exhibition, opening tomorrow, will be the last public show. Renovation is due to begin May 28, the day after the student show closes, with the public reopening tentatively set for Nov. 11. The grand structure will be made more user-friendly, both in its public spaces and behind the scenes. Plans include a new museum cafe, as well as entrance lobby and orientation center, plus expansion of the museum's popular gift shop.
NEWS
August 4, 1991 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteers inside the distinctive two-story Georgian Revival building at 11 Veterans Square in Media are working feverishly these days at "accessioning. " In the language of museums, the term means writing descriptions, assigning numbers and cataloguing exhibit materials, of which the Delaware County Institute of Science, the building's owner and occupant, has thousands, maybe millions. The institute was founded in 1833, according to its bylaws, "to promote the study and diffusion of general knowledge and the establishment of a museum, and to serve as a nonprofit organization for the people of Delaware County and adjoining areas.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
The Oneida Nation of New York was an early ally of George Washington's Continental Army, so it's entirely fitting that the nation now comes to the aid of raising a Philadelphia museum exploring the struggle for American independence.   Two centuries ago, the Oneida brought bushels of corn to starving troops at Valley Forge. Today, they're bringing millions of dollars — in the form of a $10 million grant announced last week at an event in Washington, cheered by officials of the American Revolution Center, the group that is developing the Museum of the American Revolution at Third and Chestnut Streets.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
If only the canteen could talk. Although the dark oak container looks inconsequential next to the original Declaration of Independence, it carries the inscription, "Carried at the Battle of the Brandywine. " The date: Sept. 11 - of the year 1777. In other words, it's a big deal. So are thousands of other artifacts - including a fowling firearm carved from curly maple; Washington's tents at Valley Forge; a list of soldiers from Massachusetts, some barely old enough to shave - destined for display at the Museum of the American Revolution, slated to open in Old City in 2015.
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rosenbach Museum and Library has accused its former director of misappropriating more than $250,000 worth of rare letters and manuscripts, and of selling them to a Massachusetts autograph dealer. In a civil complaint filed Wednesday, the museum alleged that Clive E. Driver, former director of the Rosenbach and now an art consultant living in Massachusetts, had for two years systematically purloined at least 30 letters written by Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and other famous Americans.
NEWS
April 25, 2013 | Dan Balz, Washington Post
DALLAS - There are twisted girders from the twin towers of the World Trade Center, the bullhorn that former President George W. Bush used from atop the pile of rubble at Ground Zero in New York, an exact replica of his Oval Office, even his collection of signed baseballs. The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, on the campus of Southern Methodist University, will be dedicated Thursday morning. The ceremony will include President Obama and all of the living former presidents.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Christopher Weber and Alicia Chang, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - It was supposed to be a slow but smooth journey to retirement, a parade through city streets for a shuttle that logged millions of miles in space. But Endeavour's final mission turned out to be a logistical headache that delayed its arrival to its museum resting place by about 17 hours. After a 12-mile weave past trees and utility poles that included thousands of adoring onlookers, flashing cameras, and even the filming of a TV commercial, Endeavour arrived at the California Science Center Sunday to a greeting party of city leaders and other dignitaries that had expected it many hours earlier.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Jason Nark, Staff Writer
There's a stuffed bald eagle giving a wild turkey a little side eye at a museum on Independence Mall, a stern look of "Don't make me fly up there. " In the United States of America, the bald eagle is most definitely the boss, the symbol of our nation, even though Benjamin Franklin preferred the gobbler over that snowy-headed raptor. On June 20, 1782, the Second Continental Congress voted to make the bald eagle a national symbol, and 200 years later, President Ronald Reagan deemed June 20 "National Bald Eagle Day. " "Whether silhouetted against the sky on a rocky pinnacle in Alaska or soaring majestically overhead in Florida, the bald eagle is admired as one of nature's most spectacular creatures," Reagan said in a proclamation at the time.
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
The Museum of the American Revolution, whose building at Third and Chestnut Streets has been under construction for two years, plans to announce Thursday that it will open its doors to the public April 19, 2017 - the 242nd anniversary of the battles of Lexington and Concord, considered the opening of hostilities between Britain and its North American colonies. When the smoke cleared following those nasty Massachusetts skirmishes so long ago, 122 fighters on both sides had lost their lives, and the colonies were launched on a revolutionary road that would not reach the goal of independence for eight arduous years.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2016 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Fashion Writer
I always assumed the vibrantly printed array of wrap skirts, maxi dresses, and kufis sold at African street fairs like last weekend's Odunde Festival were inspired by fabrics and silhouettes indigenous to the continent. Turns out I was only half right. The styles - iros (wraparound skirts), geles (head wraps), and bubas (loose-fitting blouses) - are native to central and west African countries. But ankara, the striking wax-coated cotton fabric from which the clothing is often fashioned, traces its heritage to the Netherlands.
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | John Timpane
Here are a few outstanding museum and gallery shows you should not miss this summer. Creative Africa (Through Sept. 25, Philadelphia Museum of Art) This big show is simply a revelation - the visionary work of artists throughout Africa, from contemporary photography, fashion, and architecture to centuries-old sculpture. Also programs, artist talks, family festivals, and community conversations. (215-763-8100, philamuseum.org ) Daylight Harmony: Larry Francis (Through June 30, Gross McCleaf Gallery)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2016 | By Lauren McCutcheon, FOR DoTHIS
"A lot of us know what to do when we go to a baseball game: You buy a hotdog, yell a lot, clap and cheer and whistle," said Ruth Anderson, director of arts education at Doylestown's James A. Michener Art Museum. Less obvious: How you and your kids should approach a staid and seemingly stodgy art museum. Five big-deal venues share tips for introducing children to their collections, exhibitions, and programs - and have fun doing it. Barnes Foundation 2025 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, 215-278-7200 . Family programming is relatively new - as in, fewer than five years old - at the Barnes.
NEWS
June 8, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
Carved canoes and hand-drawn carriages climb the walls. Woven baskets and wooden cradles hang from the ceiling. In the dimly glowing concrete tower, a gorgeous mess of early-American relics seems to come alive. "We call this the 'oh, my gosh' room," said director Doug Dolan - because that's what people generally say when they walk into the central court, crafted by Doylestown-born archaeologist and historian Henry Mercer in 1916. It's a spell that has been cast for the last 100 years upon visitors to the Mercer Museum, where the display of artifacts from 19th-century life has remained largely unchanged.
NEWS
May 27, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
In one of Theodore Harris' collages, now on view at the African American Museum in Philadelphia, bursts of red bleed over a printed ballot form, stickers and images layer the surface: U.S. Out of Iraq Now, Does Praying Do Any Good?, Stop Executions, the Death Penalty Is a Hate Crime. At the center of this jittery, violent triptych, beneath a plume of exploding, cascading black, is an image of Malcolm X. Harris' piece is called The Ballot or the Bullet , a very direct reference to Malcolm X's famous 1964 speech: "It's time now for you and me to become more politically mature and realize what the ballot is for; what we're supposed to get when we cast a ballot; and that if we don't cast a ballot, it's going to end up in a situation where we're going to have to cast a bullet.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Tom Hines
One of the first things visitors encounter in "Look Again: Contemporary Perspectives on African Art," the centerpiece exhibition of the five-show " Creative Africa " event at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, is a diviner's kit. The kit, from the Ovimbundu culture of Angola, consists of an array of seemingly miscellaneous objects, including some tiny figurines, a colored crystalline rock, and a number of more enigmatic items. The diviner carried them in a basket, and when someone sought his advice or predictions, he tossed them out. His skill was in looking at how they landed and interpreting the position and juxtaposition of the objects in a way that was useful to those who sought his services.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Over the roar of a backhoe and the shriek of power tools, archaeologist Rebecca Yamin stood on the edge of a dusty pit and examined what was left of the western wall of the Van Dyke Building, which stood at Third and Chestnut Streets in the middle of the 19th century. It was the last piece of a puzzle in four dimensions - mapping the site of the Museum of the American Revolution over more than 250 years. "The philosophy behind this work is, if you're going to destroy a site that's historic, we map all the features so at least there is a record," said Yamin, of the Commonwealth Heritage Group in West Chester.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
The building that once housed the Please Touch Museum near 21st and Race Streets is to be demolished to make way for an eight-townhome development, according to permits on the website of the Department of Licenses & Inspections. The project is being completed by Philadelphia-based U.S. Construction Inc., according to Logan Square Neighborhood Association President Drew Murray, whose group endorsed the proposal at a meeting last year. The demolition permit was issued May 10. Horsham-based homebuilders Toll Brothers had previously been under agreement to acquire the 30,000-square-foot building at 208 N. 21st St. with plans to build a five-story condo project at the site.
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