FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 24, 2010
Location: Media Armory (beneath Trader Joe's), 12 East State St., Media Hours: Thursday through Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m. Admission: Free Call 610-566-0788 to schedule a group or school tour. Visit for more information or to make a donation to the museum.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | Special to The Inquirer / JOHN SLAVIN
The Please Touch Museum's Traveling Trunk Show came to the Willow Grove Park mall Tuesday morning as part of the mall's "Make the Most of Your Morning" program, which runs every Tuesday from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
The Business Partners Program at the James A. Michener Art Museum is 43 members strong and growing as it enters its second year. Most of the members are small businesses that have donated $250, $500 or $1,500. "In the wake of cutbacks in government funding, it's very important to acknowledge and be grateful to the private sector," said Linda Milanesi, public-relations director for the Doylestown Borough museum. "Businesses are providing for the arts a lifeline for survival.
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | by Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is temporarily closing its Museum of American Art on North Broad Street to spiff up and modernize the 1871 structure. The Annual Student Exhibition, opening tomorrow, will be the last public show. Renovation is due to begin May 28, the day after the student show closes, with the public reopening tentatively set for Nov. 11. The grand structure will be made more user-friendly, both in its public spaces and behind the scenes. Plans include a new museum cafe, as well as entrance lobby and orientation center, plus expansion of the museum's popular gift shop.
NEWS
August 4, 1991 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteers inside the distinctive two-story Georgian Revival building at 11 Veterans Square in Media are working feverishly these days at "accessioning. " In the language of museums, the term means writing descriptions, assigning numbers and cataloguing exhibit materials, of which the Delaware County Institute of Science, the building's owner and occupant, has thousands, maybe millions. The institute was founded in 1833, according to its bylaws, "to promote the study and diffusion of general knowledge and the establishment of a museum, and to serve as a nonprofit organization for the people of Delaware County and adjoining areas.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
If only the canteen could talk. Although the dark oak container looks inconsequential next to the original Declaration of Independence, it carries the inscription, "Carried at the Battle of the Brandywine. " The date: Sept. 11 - of the year 1777. In other words, it's a big deal. So are thousands of other artifacts - including a fowling firearm carved from curly maple; Washington's tents at Valley Forge; a list of soldiers from Massachusetts, some barely old enough to shave - destined for display at the Museum of the American Revolution, slated to open in Old City in 2015.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
The Oneida Nation of New York was an early ally of George Washington's Continental Army, so it's entirely fitting that the nation now comes to the aid of raising a Philadelphia museum exploring the struggle for American independence.   Two centuries ago, the Oneida brought bushels of corn to starving troops at Valley Forge. Today, they're bringing millions of dollars — in the form of a $10 million grant announced last week at an event in Washington, cheered by officials of the American Revolution Center, the group that is developing the Museum of the American Revolution at Third and Chestnut Streets.
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rosenbach Museum and Library has accused its former director of misappropriating more than $250,000 worth of rare letters and manuscripts, and of selling them to a Massachusetts autograph dealer. In a civil complaint filed Wednesday, the museum alleged that Clive E. Driver, former director of the Rosenbach and now an art consultant living in Massachusetts, had for two years systematically purloined at least 30 letters written by Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and other famous Americans.
NEWS
April 25, 2013 | Dan Balz, Washington Post
DALLAS - There are twisted girders from the twin towers of the World Trade Center, the bullhorn that former President George W. Bush used from atop the pile of rubble at Ground Zero in New York, an exact replica of his Oval Office, even his collection of signed baseballs. The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, on the campus of Southern Methodist University, will be dedicated Thursday morning. The ceremony will include President Obama and all of the living former presidents.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Christopher Weber and Alicia Chang, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - It was supposed to be a slow but smooth journey to retirement, a parade through city streets for a shuttle that logged millions of miles in space. But Endeavour's final mission turned out to be a logistical headache that delayed its arrival to its museum resting place by about 17 hours. After a 12-mile weave past trees and utility poles that included thousands of adoring onlookers, flashing cameras, and even the filming of a TV commercial, Endeavour arrived at the California Science Center Sunday to a greeting party of city leaders and other dignitaries that had expected it many hours earlier.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Michael D. Schaffer, For The Inquirer
It would be hard for any real-life archaeologist to match the fictional Indiana Jones, but Julian Siggers gives it a good run. Siggers, 50, director of the Penn Museum since July 2012, may not crack a bullwhip or sport a battered fedora, but he does have a fondness for motorcycles and tattoos. He's also handsome, charming, and possessed of an impressive academic pedigree, including a doctorate from the University of Toronto in Near Eastern prehistoric archaeology. Born in England and educated at University College London, he came to Penn from the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, where he was vice president for programs, education, and content communication.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | Stephan Salisbury, The Inquirer
Gail Harrity, president and chief operating officer of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, will be honored with a lifetime achievement award by the Preservation Alliance of Greater Philadelphia, the alliance has announced. Carolyn Boyce, alliance executive director, said Tuesday that Harrity and the Art Museum have "diligently" cared for all of "the historically and architecturally significant buildings" in their care, citing renovation and refurbishing of the Perelman Building, the Rodin Museum, the main building, and the museum's two historic Fairmount Park mansions.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
The woman in gold in the true story Woman in Gold was Adele Bloch-Bauer, a patron of the arts in turn-of-the-century Vienna, a regal beauty who posed for Gustav Klimt. Her portrait hung in the family's apartment on the Elisabethstrasse until March 1938, when Hitler's Third Reich annexed Austria. The lives of the city's thriving Jewish community were forever changed, and the Klimt, along with other artwork, jewelry, and valuables belonging to the Bloch-Bauers, was seized by the Nazis.
NEWS
March 26, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The group had come to the Doylestown museum for a program that uses meditation to deepen the appreciation of art. But Maria Starr wasn't expecting the objet du contemplation to be a coffee table. Yet there it was at the James A. Michener Art Museum: a tree trunk transformed by the famed George Nakashima Studio. Would deep breaths and a dose of mindfulness help illuminate the artistry in a walnut table as it had for a landscape painting? Starr and 11 other museumgoers sat down around the table and closed their eyes.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | BY BECKY BATCHA & LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writers batchab@phillynews.com, 215-854-5757
GENGHIS KHAN rides into town, gay rights get celebrated, "Deep Throat" (the Watergate informant, not the smut) appears in a very '70s photo show and the great painter Horace Pippin gets a great big retrospective - his first in 20 years. So stop bellyaching that there's nothing to do. Richard Avedon: Family Affairs, April 1-Aug. 2. Rare exhibit resurrects the fashion photographer's 1976 political statement - a portfolio he shot for Rolling Stone featuring 69 black-and-white portraits of that era's power elite.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Talon Bazille Ducheneaux, 22, sits in a conference room at the University of Pennsylvania's Greenfield Intercultural Center. Born and raised in South Dakota, he identifies as Lakota and Dakota. He remembers that, in his boyhood classrooms, "they start indigenous history at 1492. " But Ducheneaux is writing his full history, in rap. On Saturday, the Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (which, fittingly enough, was built on Lenape land) will present "Modern Native Voices: The Medium of Hip Hop New Music with a Distinctly Native Beat.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2015
The long : As winter lingers, Penn's Landing's indoor-outdoor ode to life on the high seas stays blissfully quiet. Smaller guests have plenty of space to hop aboard wooden ships, run halls, push buttons and ogle an under-construction schooner before dashing to and through a steel warship and submarine docked outside. (Try doing that once Spruce Street Harbor Park opens.)   The short : Submarine life seems big - if you're under 3 feet tall.   The demo : Toddlers on up. Nautical interest a plus.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
High above all the merriment and learning of the Please Touch Museum, in the chamber between the inner and outer domes that cap Memorial Hall, you can't hear any children playing. The only sound is a distant train whistle - and, at certain inopportune times, flowing water. Once, when the museum was rented for a wedding, building engineer Hosea Brawley had to go up to the chamber and balance buckets on cast-iron beams to catch the leaks. Despite undergoing a recent extensive renovation, Memorial Hall has suffered damage to both the plaster work and the floor from water intrusion.
NEWS
March 12, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Daniel H. Weiss, president of Haverford College, is leaving after only two years to head the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, officials announced Tuesday. His presidential tenure is the shortest in Haverford's 181-year history, though the previous leader, Stephen G. Emerson, wasn't there much longer - four years. "Although my time at Haverford has been relatively brief, my experience here has been profound," Weiss, 57, said in an e-mail to the Haverford community.
SPORTS
March 3, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
JIM VANKOSKI is looking for a site for more eyes. He's the curator of the Mickey Vernon Sports Museum, a place that's as special as the man it's named after. But unless something happens very soon, Saturday will be the museum's last day as it's housed in the soon-to-be-renovated Granite Run Mall. "We have no money and no political connections and that's a bad combination," said Vankoski. What they do have is a rich collection of Delaware County sports memorabilia that needs a new home.
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