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NEWS
August 24, 2010
Location: Media Armory (beneath Trader Joe's), 12 East State St., Media Hours: Thursday through Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m. Admission: Free Call 610-566-0788 to schedule a group or school tour. Visit for more information or to make a donation to the museum.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | Special to The Inquirer / JOHN SLAVIN
The Please Touch Museum's Traveling Trunk Show came to the Willow Grove Park mall Tuesday morning as part of the mall's "Make the Most of Your Morning" program, which runs every Tuesday from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
The Business Partners Program at the James A. Michener Art Museum is 43 members strong and growing as it enters its second year. Most of the members are small businesses that have donated $250, $500 or $1,500. "In the wake of cutbacks in government funding, it's very important to acknowledge and be grateful to the private sector," said Linda Milanesi, public-relations director for the Doylestown Borough museum. "Businesses are providing for the arts a lifeline for survival.
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | by Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is temporarily closing its Museum of American Art on North Broad Street to spiff up and modernize the 1871 structure. The Annual Student Exhibition, opening tomorrow, will be the last public show. Renovation is due to begin May 28, the day after the student show closes, with the public reopening tentatively set for Nov. 11. The grand structure will be made more user-friendly, both in its public spaces and behind the scenes. Plans include a new museum cafe, as well as entrance lobby and orientation center, plus expansion of the museum's popular gift shop.
NEWS
August 4, 1991 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteers inside the distinctive two-story Georgian Revival building at 11 Veterans Square in Media are working feverishly these days at "accessioning. " In the language of museums, the term means writing descriptions, assigning numbers and cataloguing exhibit materials, of which the Delaware County Institute of Science, the building's owner and occupant, has thousands, maybe millions. The institute was founded in 1833, according to its bylaws, "to promote the study and diffusion of general knowledge and the establishment of a museum, and to serve as a nonprofit organization for the people of Delaware County and adjoining areas.
NEWS
April 25, 2013 | Dan Balz, Washington Post
DALLAS - There are twisted girders from the twin towers of the World Trade Center, the bullhorn that former President George W. Bush used from atop the pile of rubble at Ground Zero in New York, an exact replica of his Oval Office, even his collection of signed baseballs. The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, on the campus of Southern Methodist University, will be dedicated Thursday morning. The ceremony will include President Obama and all of the living former presidents.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
The Oneida Nation of New York was an early ally of George Washington's Continental Army, so it's entirely fitting that the nation now comes to the aid of raising a Philadelphia museum exploring the struggle for American independence.   Two centuries ago, the Oneida brought bushels of corn to starving troops at Valley Forge. Today, they're bringing millions of dollars — in the form of a $10 million grant announced last week at an event in Washington, cheered by officials of the American Revolution Center, the group that is developing the Museum of the American Revolution at Third and Chestnut Streets.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
If only the canteen could talk. Although the dark oak container looks inconsequential next to the original Declaration of Independence, it carries the inscription, "Carried at the Battle of the Brandywine. " The date: Sept. 11 - of the year 1777. In other words, it's a big deal. So are thousands of other artifacts - including a fowling firearm carved from curly maple; Washington's tents at Valley Forge; a list of soldiers from Massachusetts, some barely old enough to shave - destined for display at the Museum of the American Revolution, slated to open in Old City in 2015.
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rosenbach Museum and Library has accused its former director of misappropriating more than $250,000 worth of rare letters and manuscripts, and of selling them to a Massachusetts autograph dealer. In a civil complaint filed Wednesday, the museum alleged that Clive E. Driver, former director of the Rosenbach and now an art consultant living in Massachusetts, had for two years systematically purloined at least 30 letters written by Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and other famous Americans.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Christopher Weber and Alicia Chang, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - It was supposed to be a slow but smooth journey to retirement, a parade through city streets for a shuttle that logged millions of miles in space. But Endeavour's final mission turned out to be a logistical headache that delayed its arrival to its museum resting place by about 17 hours. After a 12-mile weave past trees and utility poles that included thousands of adoring onlookers, flashing cameras, and even the filming of a TV commercial, Endeavour arrived at the California Science Center Sunday to a greeting party of city leaders and other dignitaries that had expected it many hours earlier.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 18, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
With drums tat-tatting and flags billowing, with two former governors and a major benefactor gazing skyward, a white-coated steel beam signed by hundreds of construction workers and history fans was raised Thursday by a massive crane and lowered into place atop the still-abuilding Museum of the American Revolution. The celebration, attended by several hundred at the museum site at Third and Chestnut Streets, marked the "topping off" of the building's steel skeleton. Construction of the $119 million redbrick museum designed by New York's Robert A.M. Stern Architects began last fall.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
A glance down the hallway toward the gallery of the Woodmere Art Museum, where its 74th Annual Juried Exhibition begins, reveals the quirky aesthetic of jurors and artist brothers Steven and Billy Dufala. In the distance, an enormous, featureless, off-white creature shaped like a cross between a duck and a sheep lies on the floor. Behind it is a large painting of two women standing side by side against a starry night, one holding an ungainly cloudlike form, the other's face hidden by a mass of droopy hair - or something like hair.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the last 10 years, the Philadelphia Museum of Art has been systematically digitizing its entire collection of about 230,000 paintings, drawings, sculptures, furniture, artifacts, tapestries, rugs, personal artifacts - everything. Photographs, curatorial and conservation details, provenance, and analytical and art-historical minutiae have all been diligently recorded, entered into an increasingly vast database, and placed online. Other museums have also been putting their collections online, but Art Museum officials say they have moved forward with a thoroughness matched by few. Make no mistake, this is a slog.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a destructive storm howled through Philadelphia Tuesday night, John Connors' phone started to buzz with text messages from his neighbors. There were condos under construction next to the small, squat building Connors owns on East Allen Street in Fishtown, and in the high winds and heavy rain, the construction project had collapsed onto Connors' property. As water poured through the roof, Connors rushed to the scene. The damage to the building, though, was the least of his concerns.
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | BY BECKY BATCHA, Daily News Staff Writerbatchab@phillynews.com, 215-854-5757
The blockbuster "Discovering the Impressionists" exhibit that opens at the Art Museum tomorrow - after wowing crowds in Paris and London - brings to Philly a cavalcade of the art world's monster hits. You've got Renoir's dancing couples, Monet's poplar trees, Mary Cassatt's "The Child's Bath," Degas' ballet class and jockeys - it's a college-dorm poster sale come to life in painterly high-def. Chances are you've seen the mega-masterpieces somewhere: on note cards, coffee mugs, jigsaw puzzles, your bohemian auntie's silk scarves.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Chuck Darrow, Daily News Columnist
AT THIS POINT, the idea of a bricks-and-mortar shrine to Philadelphia's rich, diverse and influential musical history seems almost as old as the city itself. But a group that includes some of Our Town's most revered musical monikers has started the ball rolling toward making the dream reality. According to George Pettignano, a New York-based CBS-TV executive who is spearheading the drive to create the facility, those behind what is being referred to as the Philadelphia Music Museum & Hall of Fame are eyeing the financially beleaguered Suzanne Roberts Theatre at Broad and Lombard streets.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Memorial services are set for 2 p.m. Tuesday, June 9, for Josephine Procopio Albarelli, 92, of Philadelphia, an educator and museum guide who died Saturday, May 2, of a heart ailment at her home. The services will be held at Dinan Funeral Home, 1923 Spring Garden St. Burial was private. A native of Fulton, N.Y., Mrs. Albarelli enrolled at Alfred (N.Y.) University when she was 15 and graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in 1942. Drawn by her love of the Spanish language, she moved to Mexico City, where she earned a master's degree from the National Autonomous University of Mexico.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2015 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Less than a year ago, Asef Khurshan had never been to the Barnes Foundation. Now, the 16-year-old would like to give you a tour, starting with his favorite room, No. 19. "Because the Barnes is not a typical museum, I've worked out some hints for you," he says. In Room 19, he introduces the family of Henri Matisse as depicted in The Music Lesson and asks, "What do you see when you look at this family? What are the relationships like?" He tells you to look closely at two paintings by Chaim Soutine on another wall and compare them: "What do you notice about the brushstrokes?
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The Wagner Free Institute of Science is famed for its collection of animal and fossil specimens housed in rows of 19th-century glass cabinets. But one of the museum's greatest scientific works is neither animal nor vegetable. It's mineral: the patented iron-and-wood truss that holds up the roof. The Wagner's main exhibit hall is such a spectacular sight it's doubtful many visitors have paid much attention to the structure overhead. Yet the roof truss is what makes that immense, open-plan room possible.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Independence Seaport Museum announced Thursday that it had received four gifts totaling $13.9 million, more than doubling its endowment and marking one of the largest gift totals ever made to the Penn's Landing institution, founded in 1960. John Brady, head of the museum for four years, called the contributions "an endorsement" of the museum's direction, which he characterized as akin to "a transformation. " The gifts announced were $4.5 million from newly elected board chair Peter McCausland; $4.4 million from longtime museum supporter Peter R. Kellogg; $3 million from H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest, owner of Philadelphia Media Network and publisher of The Inquirer; and $2 million from an anonymous contributor.
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