FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 24, 2010
Location: Media Armory (beneath Trader Joe's), 12 East State St., Media Hours: Thursday through Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m. Admission: Free Call 610-566-0788 to schedule a group or school tour. Visit for more information or to make a donation to the museum.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | Special to The Inquirer / JOHN SLAVIN
The Please Touch Museum's Traveling Trunk Show came to the Willow Grove Park mall Tuesday morning as part of the mall's "Make the Most of Your Morning" program, which runs every Tuesday from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
The Business Partners Program at the James A. Michener Art Museum is 43 members strong and growing as it enters its second year. Most of the members are small businesses that have donated $250, $500 or $1,500. "In the wake of cutbacks in government funding, it's very important to acknowledge and be grateful to the private sector," said Linda Milanesi, public-relations director for the Doylestown Borough museum. "Businesses are providing for the arts a lifeline for survival.
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | by Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is temporarily closing its Museum of American Art on North Broad Street to spiff up and modernize the 1871 structure. The Annual Student Exhibition, opening tomorrow, will be the last public show. Renovation is due to begin May 28, the day after the student show closes, with the public reopening tentatively set for Nov. 11. The grand structure will be made more user-friendly, both in its public spaces and behind the scenes. Plans include a new museum cafe, as well as entrance lobby and orientation center, plus expansion of the museum's popular gift shop.
NEWS
August 4, 1991 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteers inside the distinctive two-story Georgian Revival building at 11 Veterans Square in Media are working feverishly these days at "accessioning. " In the language of museums, the term means writing descriptions, assigning numbers and cataloguing exhibit materials, of which the Delaware County Institute of Science, the building's owner and occupant, has thousands, maybe millions. The institute was founded in 1833, according to its bylaws, "to promote the study and diffusion of general knowledge and the establishment of a museum, and to serve as a nonprofit organization for the people of Delaware County and adjoining areas.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
The Oneida Nation of New York was an early ally of George Washington's Continental Army, so it's entirely fitting that the nation now comes to the aid of raising a Philadelphia museum exploring the struggle for American independence.   Two centuries ago, the Oneida brought bushels of corn to starving troops at Valley Forge. Today, they're bringing millions of dollars — in the form of a $10 million grant announced last week at an event in Washington, cheered by officials of the American Revolution Center, the group that is developing the Museum of the American Revolution at Third and Chestnut Streets.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
If only the canteen could talk. Although the dark oak container looks inconsequential next to the original Declaration of Independence, it carries the inscription, "Carried at the Battle of the Brandywine. " The date: Sept. 11 - of the year 1777. In other words, it's a big deal. So are thousands of other artifacts - including a fowling firearm carved from curly maple; Washington's tents at Valley Forge; a list of soldiers from Massachusetts, some barely old enough to shave - destined for display at the Museum of the American Revolution, slated to open in Old City in 2015.
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rosenbach Museum and Library has accused its former director of misappropriating more than $250,000 worth of rare letters and manuscripts, and of selling them to a Massachusetts autograph dealer. In a civil complaint filed Wednesday, the museum alleged that Clive E. Driver, former director of the Rosenbach and now an art consultant living in Massachusetts, had for two years systematically purloined at least 30 letters written by Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and other famous Americans.
NEWS
April 25, 2013 | Dan Balz, Washington Post
DALLAS - There are twisted girders from the twin towers of the World Trade Center, the bullhorn that former President George W. Bush used from atop the pile of rubble at Ground Zero in New York, an exact replica of his Oval Office, even his collection of signed baseballs. The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, on the campus of Southern Methodist University, will be dedicated Thursday morning. The ceremony will include President Obama and all of the living former presidents.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Christopher Weber and Alicia Chang, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - It was supposed to be a slow but smooth journey to retirement, a parade through city streets for a shuttle that logged millions of miles in space. But Endeavour's final mission turned out to be a logistical headache that delayed its arrival to its museum resting place by about 17 hours. After a 12-mile weave past trees and utility poles that included thousands of adoring onlookers, flashing cameras, and even the filming of a TV commercial, Endeavour arrived at the California Science Center Sunday to a greeting party of city leaders and other dignitaries that had expected it many hours earlier.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 19, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Dave Schwartz was a boy, his father was constantly in the hospital, and his mother would drop him at the Penn Museum while she visited her husband. Beginning in 1961, when he was 8, Schwartz spent years among the mummies, the giant sphinx, and other antiquities. "I'm kind of a museum orphan," he says now, at age 61. "I literally grew up in that museum. " One day, he was tracing hieroglyphs on a 10-foot-tall Mayan limestone monument - his sketches spread all over the floor of the Mesoamerican Gallery - when an older man in a suit stopped and asked the boy what he was doing.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in Houston, Franklin Institute chief executive Larry Dubinski "built spaceships and shuttles" with the Lego bricks he played with as a youngster. These days, Dubinski, 45, is playing with Legos on a more adult scale, having managed to snare the work of Lego artist Nathan Sawaya for the Franklin Institute's newest exhibit, "The Art of the Brick," which opened Saturday. The exhibit, with more than 100 works of art, includes a giant T-Rex made with 80,020 snapped and glued Lego bricks.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Museum of Art has acquired five major French paintings - a late Cézanne view of Mont Sainte-Victoire, a Manet still life of fruit, a landscape and a cityscape by Pissarro, and a portrait of a young girl by Berthe Morisot - all as a bequest from longtime museum supporter Helen Tyson Madeira, who died last year. In addition, the museum has received two early portraits by Marcel Duchamp, of the parents of his lifelong friend, Gustave Candel, donated by Candel's daughter, Yolande Candel.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
The celebration of the legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. continues through Sunday at the National Liberty Museum with arts, crafts, and writing. In the spirit of King's "I Have a Dream" speech, you can walk through the museum gallery for inspiration on how to help fulfill the civil rights giant's dream. With ideas you gather from what's on display in the gallery, you can go downstairs to the museum's Kids Craft Corner to compose your own inspiring speech. Celebrating the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King's Jr.'s legacy through Sunday at National Liberty Museum, 312 Chestnut St. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.
NEWS
January 25, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Visitors to the region's museums will have a rare opportunity this spring to explore the many-faceted aspects of fraktur, the sharp-angled design employed largely in German letters and printing, and much favored in the past by area communities. Multiple institutions will be participating in the fraktur extravaganza, a reflection of the region's Pennsylvania Dutch backstory. If letters and related everyday objects are not something you fancy, perhaps a mammoth prehistoric snake will do, or the witticisms of Oscar Wilde, or a full-scale model of an 18th-century schooner.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matt Gay, a mount maker at the Penn Museum, was standing in front of a display case filled with gold objects, when the sun streaked through a gallery window. "It was amazing," he said Saturday at the museum. "It was 3 in the afternoon, the shades were up in here, and the sun came through and hit that bead. It was like an intense light, an LED blazing. " Gold does that sometimes. Gay was at work helping install the museum's big 2015 exhibition, "Beneath the Surface: Life, Death, and Gold in Ancient Panama," which opens Feb. 7. He was doing what he always does, unobtrusively setting delicate artifacts into unlikely positions.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pieces of Oscar Hammerstein II's legacy remain scattered about his former Doylestown farmhouse. There's the room where he wrote the lyrics for Oklahoma! The long porch where he strolled after the success of South Pacific . And the master bedroom where he died of stomach cancer in 1960, about a year after the debut of The Sound of Music . "This is where he felt at home," his grandson Will Hammerstein said Thursday during a tour of the property, previewing the cultural institution he hopes to bring to Doylestown.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
There is nothing like a dome. Especially when it's as soaring and serene as the one that spans the Chinese rotunda at the Renaissance-style Penn Museum. The tiled canopy rests as lightly as a soap bubble on the walls of the rotunda, 90 feet above our heads, and the spare, unadorned walls make us feel as if we were entering an ancient sanctuary. When this section of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology opened on South Street in 1916, visitors marveled at the structure's gravity-defying grace and openness.
NEWS
January 9, 2015
THESE DAYS, when people say, "Represent," they're telling you to do your best. They're reminding you to bring your A-game, as the saying goes. Don't half-step. Serve as a model for those who didn't get the chances that you did. That's why "Represent: 200 Years of African-American Art in the Philadelphia Museum of Art" is a fitting moniker for a new exhibit that opens tomorrow. It showcases about 75 pieces from the museum's collection of photographs, paintings and decorative pieces by black American artists, ranging from the Harlem Renaissance photographer James VanDerZee to Philly's own Moe Brooker, who's still creating masterpieces.
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