FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 24, 2010
Location: Media Armory (beneath Trader Joe's), 12 East State St., Media Hours: Thursday through Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m. Admission: Free Call 610-566-0788 to schedule a group or school tour. Visit for more information or to make a donation to the museum.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | Special to The Inquirer / JOHN SLAVIN
The Please Touch Museum's Traveling Trunk Show came to the Willow Grove Park mall Tuesday morning as part of the mall's "Make the Most of Your Morning" program, which runs every Tuesday from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
The Business Partners Program at the James A. Michener Art Museum is 43 members strong and growing as it enters its second year. Most of the members are small businesses that have donated $250, $500 or $1,500. "In the wake of cutbacks in government funding, it's very important to acknowledge and be grateful to the private sector," said Linda Milanesi, public-relations director for the Doylestown Borough museum. "Businesses are providing for the arts a lifeline for survival.
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | by Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is temporarily closing its Museum of American Art on North Broad Street to spiff up and modernize the 1871 structure. The Annual Student Exhibition, opening tomorrow, will be the last public show. Renovation is due to begin May 28, the day after the student show closes, with the public reopening tentatively set for Nov. 11. The grand structure will be made more user-friendly, both in its public spaces and behind the scenes. Plans include a new museum cafe, as well as entrance lobby and orientation center, plus expansion of the museum's popular gift shop.
NEWS
August 4, 1991 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteers inside the distinctive two-story Georgian Revival building at 11 Veterans Square in Media are working feverishly these days at "accessioning. " In the language of museums, the term means writing descriptions, assigning numbers and cataloguing exhibit materials, of which the Delaware County Institute of Science, the building's owner and occupant, has thousands, maybe millions. The institute was founded in 1833, according to its bylaws, "to promote the study and diffusion of general knowledge and the establishment of a museum, and to serve as a nonprofit organization for the people of Delaware County and adjoining areas.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
The Oneida Nation of New York was an early ally of George Washington's Continental Army, so it's entirely fitting that the nation now comes to the aid of raising a Philadelphia museum exploring the struggle for American independence.   Two centuries ago, the Oneida brought bushels of corn to starving troops at Valley Forge. Today, they're bringing millions of dollars — in the form of a $10 million grant announced last week at an event in Washington, cheered by officials of the American Revolution Center, the group that is developing the Museum of the American Revolution at Third and Chestnut Streets.
NEWS
April 25, 2013 | Dan Balz, Washington Post
DALLAS - There are twisted girders from the twin towers of the World Trade Center, the bullhorn that former President George W. Bush used from atop the pile of rubble at Ground Zero in New York, an exact replica of his Oval Office, even his collection of signed baseballs. The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, on the campus of Southern Methodist University, will be dedicated Thursday morning. The ceremony will include President Obama and all of the living former presidents.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
If only the canteen could talk. Although the dark oak container looks inconsequential next to the original Declaration of Independence, it carries the inscription, "Carried at the Battle of the Brandywine. " The date: Sept. 11 - of the year 1777. In other words, it's a big deal. So are thousands of other artifacts - including a fowling firearm carved from curly maple; Washington's tents at Valley Forge; a list of soldiers from Massachusetts, some barely old enough to shave - destined for display at the Museum of the American Revolution, slated to open in Old City in 2015.
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rosenbach Museum and Library has accused its former director of misappropriating more than $250,000 worth of rare letters and manuscripts, and of selling them to a Massachusetts autograph dealer. In a civil complaint filed Wednesday, the museum alleged that Clive E. Driver, former director of the Rosenbach and now an art consultant living in Massachusetts, had for two years systematically purloined at least 30 letters written by Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and other famous Americans.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Christopher Weber and Alicia Chang, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - It was supposed to be a slow but smooth journey to retirement, a parade through city streets for a shuttle that logged millions of miles in space. But Endeavour's final mission turned out to be a logistical headache that delayed its arrival to its museum resting place by about 17 hours. After a 12-mile weave past trees and utility poles that included thousands of adoring onlookers, flashing cameras, and even the filming of a TV commercial, Endeavour arrived at the California Science Center Sunday to a greeting party of city leaders and other dignitaries that had expected it many hours earlier.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Tom Hines
One of the first things visitors encounter in "Look Again: Contemporary Perspectives on African Art," the centerpiece exhibition of the five-show " Creative Africa " event at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, is a diviner's kit. The kit, from the Ovimbundu culture of Angola, consists of an array of seemingly miscellaneous objects, including some tiny figurines, a colored crystalline rock, and a number of more enigmatic items. The diviner carried them in a basket, and when someone sought his advice or predictions, he tossed them out. His skill was in looking at how they landed and interpreting the position and juxtaposition of the objects in a way that was useful to those who sought his services.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Over the roar of a backhoe and the shriek of power tools, archaeologist Rebecca Yamin stood on the edge of a dusty pit and examined what was left of the western wall of the Van Dyke Building, which stood at Third and Chestnut Streets in the middle of the 19th century. It was the last piece of a puzzle in four dimensions - mapping the site of the Museum of the American Revolution over more than 250 years. "The philosophy behind this work is, if you're going to destroy a site that's historic, we map all the features so at least there is a record," said Yamin, of the Commonwealth Heritage Group in West Chester.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
The building that once housed the Please Touch Museum near 21st and Race Streets is to be demolished to make way for an eight-townhome development, according to permits on the website of the Department of Licenses & Inspections. The project is being completed by Philadelphia-based U.S. Construction Inc., according to Logan Square Neighborhood Association President Drew Murray, whose group endorsed the proposal at a meeting last year. The demolition permit was issued May 10. Horsham-based homebuilders Toll Brothers had previously been under agreement to acquire the 30,000-square-foot building at 208 N. 21st St. with plans to build a five-story condo project at the site.
NEWS
May 16, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
It's not every day that you lose your curator of just about everything except the kitchen sink (and maybe that, too). But, then again, Joseph Rishel is not actually leaving the Philadelphia Museum of Art. After 41/2 decades, much of it spent with the august title of Gisela and Dennis Alter senior curator of European painting before 1900, the John G. Johnson Collection, and the Rodin Museum, Rishel has retired. He's now simply emeritus curator of European painting - a curator who comes in at 10 in the morning, not 9, and doesn't wear a tie, he says.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
An engineer who sued after he nearly died more than three years ago, when he fell 38 feet through a glass ceiling at the Rodin Museum, has reached a $7.25 million settlement with the defendants, including the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the museum's security company, lawyers for the man said Tuesday. The settlement was reached last week in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court before jury selection began, said lawyers Larry Bendesky, David Kwass, and David Langsam, who filed the suit on behalf of Phani Guthula.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Ronnie Polaneczky
IT GOES WITHOUT saying that if your institution is named for Benjamin Franklin, you shouldn't engage in practices that would make America's founding Everyman puke with revulsion on his buckled shoes. So shame on the Franklin Institute for demanding admissions fees for personal-care attendants who must accompany their disabled clients to the museum. And - mwah! - a big, fat kiss to U.S. District Judge Gerald A. McHugh, who just ruled against the institute, which was sued for its nasty, petty, mean-spirited penny-pinching.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2016
Curious George at the Please Touch Museum The long: Playful, colorful, English-and-Spanish homage to writer Magret and illustrator H.A. Rey's inquisitive primate and The Man with The Yellow Hat feels like a permanent installation at the Please Touch. Sadly, George skips town in September. The short: Good little monkeys are always very curious. The demo: Best for ages 3 to 7. The layout: Main floor, beyond the Wanamaker monorail, an inflated George hangs over a quaint village with interactive sites: a cottage, apartment, park, produce stand, rocket-slash-slide, mini golf, drafting table, and construction.
NEWS
May 8, 2016 | Thomas Hine, for The Inquirer
There is one joyous moment in the Fabric Workshop and Museum's current exhibition, "Ally," and it is about someone else's joy. It is a video, projected on a very large screen, showing the face of dancer-choreographer Anna Halprin as she watches a performance of Rope Dance, a work she created for this exhibition, in collaboration with sculptor Janine Antoni and choreographer Stephen Petronio. Halprin, who is 95, has a deeply lined face, and as she reacts to the dance, you can see where every wrinkle came from - some to express surprise, others to show concern, curiosity, amusement, elation, pride, and a flow of other emotions.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2016
Art Museums & Institutions African American Heritage Museum 661 Jackson Rd., Newtonville; 609-704-5495. www.aahmsnj.org . Glynnis Reed, Anne Taylor Glapion, and Leonard R. Wilkinson Exhibit. Free. Closes 5/29. Tue.-Fri. 10 am-3 pm. The Barnes Foundation - Philadelphia 2025 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.; 215-278-7000. www.barnesfoundation.org . Permanent Collection. Picasso: The Great War, Experimentation & Change. $14; $29, $27 seniors, $15 students and children includes collection admission.
NEWS
May 5, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
The homeless Civil War Museum of Philadelphia, steward of what scholars regard as one of the finest collections of Civil War materials anywhere but possessing no place to display them, reached an agreement Monday to transfer ownership of its roughly 3,000 artifacts to the Gettysburg Foundation, the private, nonprofit partner of the National Park Service. At the same time, the National Constitution Center on Independence Mall has agreed to mount a permanent exhibition exploring the constitutional impact of the Civil War, using artifacts drawn from what is now the foundation's Gettysburg collection.
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