FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 24, 2010
Location: Media Armory (beneath Trader Joe's), 12 East State St., Media Hours: Thursday through Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m. Admission: Free Call 610-566-0788 to schedule a group or school tour. Visit for more information or to make a donation to the museum.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | Special to The Inquirer / JOHN SLAVIN
The Please Touch Museum's Traveling Trunk Show came to the Willow Grove Park mall Tuesday morning as part of the mall's "Make the Most of Your Morning" program, which runs every Tuesday from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
The Business Partners Program at the James A. Michener Art Museum is 43 members strong and growing as it enters its second year. Most of the members are small businesses that have donated $250, $500 or $1,500. "In the wake of cutbacks in government funding, it's very important to acknowledge and be grateful to the private sector," said Linda Milanesi, public-relations director for the Doylestown Borough museum. "Businesses are providing for the arts a lifeline for survival.
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | by Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is temporarily closing its Museum of American Art on North Broad Street to spiff up and modernize the 1871 structure. The Annual Student Exhibition, opening tomorrow, will be the last public show. Renovation is due to begin May 28, the day after the student show closes, with the public reopening tentatively set for Nov. 11. The grand structure will be made more user-friendly, both in its public spaces and behind the scenes. Plans include a new museum cafe, as well as entrance lobby and orientation center, plus expansion of the museum's popular gift shop.
NEWS
August 4, 1991 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteers inside the distinctive two-story Georgian Revival building at 11 Veterans Square in Media are working feverishly these days at "accessioning. " In the language of museums, the term means writing descriptions, assigning numbers and cataloguing exhibit materials, of which the Delaware County Institute of Science, the building's owner and occupant, has thousands, maybe millions. The institute was founded in 1833, according to its bylaws, "to promote the study and diffusion of general knowledge and the establishment of a museum, and to serve as a nonprofit organization for the people of Delaware County and adjoining areas.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
If only the canteen could talk. Although the dark oak container looks inconsequential next to the original Declaration of Independence, it carries the inscription, "Carried at the Battle of the Brandywine. " The date: Sept. 11 - of the year 1777. In other words, it's a big deal. So are thousands of other artifacts - including a fowling firearm carved from curly maple; Washington's tents at Valley Forge; a list of soldiers from Massachusetts, some barely old enough to shave - destined for display at the Museum of the American Revolution, slated to open in Old City in 2015.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
The Oneida Nation of New York was an early ally of George Washington's Continental Army, so it's entirely fitting that the nation now comes to the aid of raising a Philadelphia museum exploring the struggle for American independence.   Two centuries ago, the Oneida brought bushels of corn to starving troops at Valley Forge. Today, they're bringing millions of dollars — in the form of a $10 million grant announced last week at an event in Washington, cheered by officials of the American Revolution Center, the group that is developing the Museum of the American Revolution at Third and Chestnut Streets.
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rosenbach Museum and Library has accused its former director of misappropriating more than $250,000 worth of rare letters and manuscripts, and of selling them to a Massachusetts autograph dealer. In a civil complaint filed Wednesday, the museum alleged that Clive E. Driver, former director of the Rosenbach and now an art consultant living in Massachusetts, had for two years systematically purloined at least 30 letters written by Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and other famous Americans.
NEWS
April 25, 2013 | Dan Balz, Washington Post
DALLAS - There are twisted girders from the twin towers of the World Trade Center, the bullhorn that former President George W. Bush used from atop the pile of rubble at Ground Zero in New York, an exact replica of his Oval Office, even his collection of signed baseballs. The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, on the campus of Southern Methodist University, will be dedicated Thursday morning. The ceremony will include President Obama and all of the living former presidents.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Christopher Weber and Alicia Chang, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - It was supposed to be a slow but smooth journey to retirement, a parade through city streets for a shuttle that logged millions of miles in space. But Endeavour's final mission turned out to be a logistical headache that delayed its arrival to its museum resting place by about 17 hours. After a 12-mile weave past trees and utility poles that included thousands of adoring onlookers, flashing cameras, and even the filming of a TV commercial, Endeavour arrived at the California Science Center Sunday to a greeting party of city leaders and other dignitaries that had expected it many hours earlier.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
In the months before his death, the Rev. James A. Benson kept working on exhibits for his museum in Lawnside. "He was sick in the hospital, cutting things out of the newspaper and using the nurses' tape," Benson's widow, Ellen, recalls. "He was always asking, 'What's going on at the museum?' " A retired Lawnside postmaster, she's grateful that her husband - who was 81 when he died of leukemia Dec. 8 - doesn't have to hear the answer to his frequent question. The Benson History Museum he founded, owned, and operated (at no charge to visitors)
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA They were told to make it better - Philadelphia's Art Commission would accept no less from architects designing a proposed $150 million museum devoted to the Revolutionary War. Especially one that would stand just two blocks from Independence Hall. So Wednesday, Robert A.M. Stern Architects delivered. And they were rewarded with unanimous approval of revised designs they had put together for the Museum of the American Revolution at Third and Chestnut Streets. The panel's vote effectively clears the way for building permits to be issued in the months ahead and for construction plans to be drawn up for a hoped-for opening in late 2016.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The metallic Geoffrey Beene mini in the Philadelphia Museum of Art's exhibit "Silver and Gold Fashions Since 1960" is the sartorial standout of this glitzy gallery show. The dress is just beautiful: Beene scattered shiny hot-pink, orange, and green blossoms throughout its bodice, and he planted a garden of the neon blooms along the collar and hemline. "The year was 1967, and Beene had declared the ball gown passé," said Kristina Haugland, who plucked all of the show's shiny showstoppers from the museum's 30,000-piece costume collection.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lucille and Harold never quite recovered from the loss of their son Jacob, who drowned on his eighth birthday. Now in their 70s, they have spent nearly half a century dealing with their regrets, their guilt, their anger. Then one day Jacob shows up at their door - still 8 years old. That's the heartrending premise of Jason Mott's best-selling debut novel, The Returned , an intimate portrait of scores of men, women, and children who inexplicably return from the dead. Released in August, it was issued in paperback Tuesday.
NEWS
March 29, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware Art Museum is planning to sell as many as four unnamed paintings to cover $20 million in old construction debt and replenish its endowment funds, the museum said Wednesday. "After detailed analysis, heavy scrutiny, and the exhaustion of every reasonable alternative to relieve our bond debt, the trustees had two agonizing choices in front of them - to either sell works of art or to close our doors," museum chief executive Mike Miller said in a statement. "While today's decision is certainly hard to bear, the closure of this 100-year-old museum would be, by comparison, unbearable.
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON & BECKY BATCHA, Daily News Staff Writers mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
THE FRANKLIN Institute opens a whole new wing June 14, and there's plenty more to explore, museumwise, in Philly between now and that red-letter date. Get yer history here . . . and your art, your natural science, your anthropology, your baseball and even your Dowager Countess' closet. Chasing Dreams: Baseball & Becoming American, opened March 13. Already got a sinking feeling this ain't the Phils' year? No worries. This altogether inspiring homegrown exhibit reminds you it's not about winning or losing, it's about how our national pastime became a metaphor - if not a means - for assimilating into the American mainstream.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Celebrate Pippi Longstocking and all things Swedish Sunday as the American Swedish Museum marks Waffle Day and debuts its interactive exhibition "Do You Know Pippi Longstocking?" From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. indulge in fresh waffles, coffee and beverages while learning the history of the Waffle Day holiday. Starting at 2, guests can experience the exhibition about the children's book character Pippi Longstocking, subject of beloved stories by Astrid Lindgren. Make Pippi masks and socks, do some pretend cooking, smell the spices in Pippi's kitchen, or search through Pippi's dresser and see what fun things you can find.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
George D. Horst came to America from Germany as a young man, made his fortune in the hosiery business in Reading, and then turned his attention to art. In 1911, Horst acquired his first painting. More followed. He bought American impressionists, such as Daniel Garber, and Barbizon painters, such as Corot, many from the annual exhibitions at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Perhaps unsurprisingly, Horst became heavily involved in establishing the Reading Public Museum.
NEWS
March 18, 2014 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a light snow fell on the 55-acre Hildacy Farm preserve in Delaware County, Molly K. Morrison glanced out her office window and appreciated the view outside. "I like looking at snow," said Morrison, president and CEO of Natural Lands Trust. The snow, she said, accentuated the hilly landscape and robust trails in Media, where her nonprofit conservation group has its headquarters. Resolved to protect the Earth's natural habitat, Morrison said, she inherited that interest from her family.
TRAVEL
March 17, 2014 | By Sea Kaplan, For The Inquirer
At the end of July I had the unexpected pleasure of taking a river cruise in Russia with a friend. This was exciting - my mother was from Zvenyhorodka, a town north of Kiev in the Ukraine, my father from a suburb south of Kiev. The cruise started out in St. Petersburg and wound up in Moscow. On a scheduled bus trip in Moscow, we went to the Museum of the Jewish History in Russia, the only Jewish museum and Holocaust memorial in the country. When we got to the museum, the men were laying tefillin - wearing black boxes on their foreheads containing verses from the Torah that serve as a reminder of God's intervention during the Exodus from Egypt - so we were ushered upstairs to the balcony for the service.
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