FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 24, 2010
Location: Media Armory (beneath Trader Joe's), 12 East State St., Media Hours: Thursday through Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m. Admission: Free Call 610-566-0788 to schedule a group or school tour. Visit for more information or to make a donation to the museum.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | Special to The Inquirer / JOHN SLAVIN
The Please Touch Museum's Traveling Trunk Show came to the Willow Grove Park mall Tuesday morning as part of the mall's "Make the Most of Your Morning" program, which runs every Tuesday from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
The Business Partners Program at the James A. Michener Art Museum is 43 members strong and growing as it enters its second year. Most of the members are small businesses that have donated $250, $500 or $1,500. "In the wake of cutbacks in government funding, it's very important to acknowledge and be grateful to the private sector," said Linda Milanesi, public-relations director for the Doylestown Borough museum. "Businesses are providing for the arts a lifeline for survival.
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | by Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is temporarily closing its Museum of American Art on North Broad Street to spiff up and modernize the 1871 structure. The Annual Student Exhibition, opening tomorrow, will be the last public show. Renovation is due to begin May 28, the day after the student show closes, with the public reopening tentatively set for Nov. 11. The grand structure will be made more user-friendly, both in its public spaces and behind the scenes. Plans include a new museum cafe, as well as entrance lobby and orientation center, plus expansion of the museum's popular gift shop.
NEWS
August 4, 1991 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteers inside the distinctive two-story Georgian Revival building at 11 Veterans Square in Media are working feverishly these days at "accessioning. " In the language of museums, the term means writing descriptions, assigning numbers and cataloguing exhibit materials, of which the Delaware County Institute of Science, the building's owner and occupant, has thousands, maybe millions. The institute was founded in 1833, according to its bylaws, "to promote the study and diffusion of general knowledge and the establishment of a museum, and to serve as a nonprofit organization for the people of Delaware County and adjoining areas.
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
The Museum of the American Revolution, whose building at Third and Chestnut Streets has been under construction for two years, plans to announce Thursday that it will open its doors to the public April 19, 2017 - the 242nd anniversary of the battles of Lexington and Concord, considered the opening of hostilities between Britain and its North American colonies. When the smoke cleared following those nasty Massachusetts skirmishes so long ago, 122 fighters on both sides had lost their lives, and the colonies were launched on a revolutionary road that would not reach the goal of independence for eight arduous years.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
The Oneida Nation of New York was an early ally of George Washington's Continental Army, so it's entirely fitting that the nation now comes to the aid of raising a Philadelphia museum exploring the struggle for American independence.   Two centuries ago, the Oneida brought bushels of corn to starving troops at Valley Forge. Today, they're bringing millions of dollars — in the form of a $10 million grant announced last week at an event in Washington, cheered by officials of the American Revolution Center, the group that is developing the Museum of the American Revolution at Third and Chestnut Streets.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
If only the canteen could talk. Although the dark oak container looks inconsequential next to the original Declaration of Independence, it carries the inscription, "Carried at the Battle of the Brandywine. " The date: Sept. 11 - of the year 1777. In other words, it's a big deal. So are thousands of other artifacts - including a fowling firearm carved from curly maple; Washington's tents at Valley Forge; a list of soldiers from Massachusetts, some barely old enough to shave - destined for display at the Museum of the American Revolution, slated to open in Old City in 2015.
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rosenbach Museum and Library has accused its former director of misappropriating more than $250,000 worth of rare letters and manuscripts, and of selling them to a Massachusetts autograph dealer. In a civil complaint filed Wednesday, the museum alleged that Clive E. Driver, former director of the Rosenbach and now an art consultant living in Massachusetts, had for two years systematically purloined at least 30 letters written by Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and other famous Americans.
NEWS
April 25, 2013 | Dan Balz, Washington Post
DALLAS - There are twisted girders from the twin towers of the World Trade Center, the bullhorn that former President George W. Bush used from atop the pile of rubble at Ground Zero in New York, an exact replica of his Oval Office, even his collection of signed baseballs. The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, on the campus of Southern Methodist University, will be dedicated Thursday morning. The ceremony will include President Obama and all of the living former presidents.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 22, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
When President Obama helps dedicate the National Museum of African American History and Culture on Saturday in Washington, he'll be marking the debut on the National Mall of the black experience. Starting from nothing, over the last decade and a half, the museum has acquired a collection of close to 40,000 objects and documents; more than 3,000 will be on exhibition when doors open at 1 p.m., after a musical prelude and a dedication ceremony that begins at 9 a.m. By virtue of its size and national focus, the museum will obviously be telling a sweeping story.
NEWS
September 22, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
David McCullough has won two Pulitzers, two National Book Awards, a slew of literary honors, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom over the course of a literary career that spans more than half a century. But, he said in a recent interview, he was most excited to receive the award presented to him Tuesday night at the Museum of the American Revolution in Old City. McCullough was feted as the inaugural recipient of the Gerry Lenfest Spirit of the American Revolution Award, which will be given to those who contribute to the public's understanding of the Revolution.
NEWS
September 19, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, CULTURE WRITER
Pop culture muscles in on the offerings this fall at Philadelphia-area nonvisual museums. The world of Jurassic Park will take over the Franklin Institute with an exhibition featuring huge animatronic dinos - and pulsing rock will shake up the National Museum of American Jewish History when a show moves in exploring the life and influence of rock impresario Bill Graham. But pop will not take over everything. The Free Library will acknowledge the arrival of its new neighbor, the Mormon Temple, with an exhibition exploring early Mormon writing.
NEWS
September 18, 2016 | Thomas Hine, FOR THE INQUIRER
For art museums, this season is all about the Big Picture, in more ways than one. The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is providing a visual panorama of how Americans responded to one of the most catastrophic events of the 20th century. And at its heart is an epic, CinemaScope-scale painting of a grotesque event, Gassed by John Singer Sargent, on loan from the Imperial War Museum in London. The great 20th-century Mexican muralists also produced some big pictures, often on big subjects, such as The Epic of American Civilization , by José Clemente Orozco.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
In the big, ongoing festival of American culture, the National Mall in Washington is the main stage. Ever since the Smithsonian Institution erected its imposing stone castle there in 1855, the linear park has been assembling an all-star lineup of museums and monuments that collectively tell our nation's story. The mall has even managed to find room for events that happened abroad, like the Holocaust. And yet, a fundamental part of the American story, one that informs almost everything that happens in our country, has largely been left out of the mix. That omission will finally be rectified Sept.
NEWS
September 11, 2016 | By William Bender, Staff Writer
Sometimes you eat the catfish, and sometimes the catfish falls from the sky and smacks you in the face. Lisa Lobree learned that lesson Labor Day morning when she was walking to meet her CoreFitness class near the Art Museum, heard a "rustling" in the trees, and then -. "Suddenly I was slammed by something," Lobree recalled Friday. "I was like, 'What?!' I was freaking out. " The injuries: Minor. The trauma: Immeasurable. The theory: A bird was flying with the fish in its mouth and accidentally dropped it. On her face.
SPORTS
September 9, 2016 | By Sam Carchidi, STAFF WRITER
Second of two parts Lou Scheinfeld is spearheading a project that he hopes will lead to a sports museum - featuring artifacts from the Phillies, Eagles, Flyers, and 76ers - being erected near the South Philadelphia sports complex. For the last five years, Scheinfeld, a former Flyers vice president, has been meeting with civic leaders and city groups, cultivating the idea of having a Philadelphia sports museum built in the shadow of the Wells Fargo Center, Lincoln Financial Field, and Citizens Bank Park.
SPORTS
September 8, 2016 | By Sam Carchidi, STAFF WRITER
First of two parts When you walk into the DePace Sports Museum in Collingswood, you are greeted by a dizzying, one-of-a-kind array of memorabilia from the Phillies, Eagles, Flyers, and 76ers, among others. The museum, which organizers hope is relocated to the South Philadelphia sports complex in the near future, is loaded with jerseys and equipment used by a who's who in sports. The most charming part of the museum, however, is the collection of unique artifacts that Nicholas DePace has accumulated, including the bell from the famed 1926 heavyweight championship fight between Jack Dempsey and Gene Tunney before more than 120,000 fans in rainy Philadelphia, and the turnstile from old Connie Mack Stadium.
NEWS
September 6, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
It would have been a typical young professionals happy hour - cheese platters, cocktails, polite conversation - but for the skull in the glass case at the front of the room. And the photos of skulls on the wall. And the wall of skulls in the next room, down the way from the eight-foot-long preserved megacolon and the cross-sections of various cysts. But it's here - at the Mutter Museum, one of the city's oldest, weirdest, and hands-down goriest tourist attractions - that the storied College of Physicians is trying to change the very makeup of its profession.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
These days, we take it for granted that a big outdoor show such as this weekend's Made in America Festival or an arena spectacle such as Barbra Streisand's recent "The Music . . . The Mem'ries . . . The Magic" will land with lots of high-tech eye candy. Think huge video close-up of the artists visible a half a mile away, plus abstract art flashed on LED screens. And woe to the flimsy pop darling or the electronic dance music DJ if the video system crashes. The "excitement" would deflate faster than a popped party balloon.
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