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ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1986 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Staff Writer
John T. Dorrance Jr. has been elected chairman of the board of trustees of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, succeeding Henry P. McIlhenny, who died last spring. Dorrance has been a museum trustee since 1964 and had served as vice chairman of the board for the last six years. Elected to succeed Dorrance as vice chairman was Philip I. Berman, a member of the board since 1980. In his first official act as chairman, Dorrance announced the receipt of a $1-million challenge grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.
NEWS
July 21, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marian Taylor Mitchell, 91, former president of the board of the Philadelphia History Museum at the Atwater Kent and widow of the prominent sculptor Henry Mitchell, died of lung cancer Friday, June 4, at the Watermark on Logan Square. For 38 years, Mrs. Mitchell was married to Henry Mitchell, whose work included the Impala Fountain at the Philadelphia Zoo, the Winged Ox at Thomas Jefferson University, and the "Running Free" horse sculptures at Drexel University. After her husband's death in 1980, Mrs. Mitchell joined the board of the Atwater Kent and was president from 1984 to 1992.
NEWS
January 16, 1987 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
It would have been ultra-gauche to have nailed one of her company's green- and-white For Sale signs to the late Henry P. McIlhenny's elegant Rittenhouse Square townhouse, so Barbara Greenfield is spreading the word more selectively. The fabled McIlhenny manse on the southwest corner of the square, the scene over the years of scores of glittering society parties and Art Museum dinners (McIlhenny was chairman of the museum board when he died May 11), has been put on the market by McIlhenny's four nephews, to whom he left it; they are the sons of his late sister, Bonnie Wintersteen.
NEWS
September 13, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
AFTER TWO years of languishing under the weight of $60 million in bond debt, the Please Touch Museum has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The museum reached a settlement with its bondholders yesterday, according to a release issued by the museum's board. "Today's filing puts Please Touch Museum on a path toward even greater success," said Sally Stetson, the board's chair. Stetson stressed that the museum, housed in Memorial Hall off Parkside Avenue in West Philly, will remain open as it works to find "stable financial ground.
NEWS
July 31, 1988 | By Martha McDonald, Special to The Inquirer
Upper Darby's Greeks are dreaming big. And the dream, a Greek-American museum that they say would be the first in the country, got a real shot in the pocketbook this week with a $10,000 check from the Pennsylvania Department of Community Affairs. The check, presented to the Greek museum's board of directors by state Rep. Mario J. Civera Jr., Republican of the 164th District, on Wednesday evening, will be used to turn a home at 223 Powell Lane into the museum, said George Christoforidis, the driving force behind the dream.
NEWS
November 28, 1997 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
Philip Berman, longtime chairman of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, who devoted nearly two decades and much of his own money to his beloved institution, died Wednesday evening after a long battle with cancer. He was 83. Berman, who traveled the world over to build a personal collection of priceless paintings and sculptures, joined the museum board of trustees in 1980. At the time of his death, he was a chairman emeritus and board member. Though he served as chairman of Hess's department stores and of public television stations statewide, his great love was the museum.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Please Touch Museum, in default on the debt it assumed to renovate a new home in Memorial Hall, eliminated nine positions Wednesday as part of a budget-trimming process. The cuts represent about a 4 percent reduction in staff. The museum's board is seeking to increase revenue from individuals, corporations, foundations, and government sources, said interim president and CEO Lynn McMaster, and "must demonstrate that the museum is operating as efficiently as possible. " This means across-the-board cuts of about $400,000 on the museum's $9 million annual budget, she said.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Deeply dissatisfied with Robert A.M. Stern's design for a Revolutionary War museum near Independence Hall, the Philadelphia Art Commission has taken the unusual - and welcome - step of asking the prominent New York architect to go back to the drawing board. Although the commission did not reject the $150 million project outright, it sent a clear message to the organizers Feb. 5, saying that the faux-colonial home planned for the Museum of the American Revolution Center did not measure up to authentic colonial-era buildings nearby.
NEWS
August 25, 2011
Claudia Gould, director of the Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania since 1999, has been named director of the Jewish Museum in New York City. She will assume her new position this fall, succeeding Joan Rosenbaum, who is retiring after 30 years. ICA's budget has tripled under Gould, exceeding $3 million this fiscal year, with exhibition frequency and staff increases reflecting that growth. Gould has sought to strengthen ties between ICA and the rest of Penn, and has supported a number of artists early in their careers, giving their first comprehensive museum shows to Lisa Yuskavage, Karen Kilimnik, Charles LeDray, and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Rafael Ferrer remembers the day all too well. At the end of February, he was speaking on the phone with Stanley I. Grand, director of the Lancaster Museum of Art and long a fan of Ferrer's sculptures, installations, and paintings. They were discussing the final logistics of a major Ferrer retrospective that Grand was curating, scheduled to open at his museum March 30 - a survey of the Puerto Rican-born, 78-year-old artist's works on paper, a vast collection of lush, mostly previously unseen images.
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NEWS
September 13, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
AFTER TWO years of languishing under the weight of $60 million in bond debt, the Please Touch Museum has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The museum reached a settlement with its bondholders yesterday, according to a release issued by the museum's board. "Today's filing puts Please Touch Museum on a path toward even greater success," said Sally Stetson, the board's chair. Stetson stressed that the museum, housed in Memorial Hall off Parkside Avenue in West Philly, will remain open as it works to find "stable financial ground.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a destructive storm howled through Philadelphia Tuesday night, John Connors' phone started to buzz with text messages from his neighbors. There were condos under construction next to the small, squat building Connors owns on East Allen Street in Fishtown, and in the high winds and heavy rain, the construction project had collapsed onto Connors' property. As water poured through the roof, Connors rushed to the scene. The damage to the building, though, was the least of his concerns.
NEWS
September 14, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Local aviation enthusiasts are setting their sights high with a proposed renovation of the Wings of Freedom museum in Horsham, hoping that it could someday rival the Smithsonian's Air and Space Museum. The designs, unveiled Friday at a fund-raiser in Blue Bell, call for a $24 million, green-certified campus to replace the existing museum. The planes now displayed on the lawn would move inside an all-glass exhibit hall. A circuitous, multilevel viewing path would showcase the planes from above and below.
NEWS
August 2, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Museum of Art has received a $5 million grant from the state to help fund $150 million to $160 million in major renovations and upgrades to the main building and its nearly 500,000 square feet of interior space. The renovations are a critical part of a long-planned transformation and expansion, which ultimately will include new gallery spaces beneath the museum terrace at the end of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The state funds, however, will not go toward creation of any new galleries - under the terrace or within the museum - nor will they help create a new museum education center.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Deeply dissatisfied with Robert A.M. Stern's design for a Revolutionary War museum near Independence Hall, the Philadelphia Art Commission has taken the unusual - and welcome - step of asking the prominent New York architect to go back to the drawing board. Although the commission did not reject the $150 million project outright, it sent a clear message to the organizers Feb. 5, saying that the faux-colonial home planned for the Museum of the American Revolution Center did not measure up to authentic colonial-era buildings nearby.
NEWS
December 11, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
What are the chances? Both men served on bombers during World War II and flew dangerous missions from airfields in Italy. Both had planes shot out from under them during bomb runs. And both were taken prisoner by the Germans and held in the same POW camp - Stalag Luft 1. Now, nearly 70 years after they were liberated by the Russians, the two veterans will be united at 4 p.m. next Tuesday at the Millville Army Airfield Museum at Millville (N.J.) Airport, where they'll also recount their experiences for visitors at 6 p.m. Bill Hogan, 93, a museum tour guide who lives in Millville, and Dan Theokas, 90, of Vineland, N.J., briefly met each other during a chance encounter at the museum in August.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Please Touch Museum, in default on the debt it assumed to renovate a new home in Memorial Hall, eliminated nine positions Wednesday as part of a budget-trimming process. The cuts represent about a 4 percent reduction in staff. The museum's board is seeking to increase revenue from individuals, corporations, foundations, and government sources, said interim president and CEO Lynn McMaster, and "must demonstrate that the museum is operating as efficiently as possible. " This means across-the-board cuts of about $400,000 on the museum's $9 million annual budget, she said.
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
For two days in 1967, Glassboro police Capt. Philip J. Coppolino stood outside the Hollybush Mansion on the Rowan University campus, scanning the crowd, helping to provide security for the two world leaders holed up inside trying to defuse Cold War tensions. The face-to-face encounter between President Lyndon B. Johnson and Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin became known as the Glassboro Summit. It has been celebrated since by Rowan University - then Glassboro State College - and referenced in historical accounts.
NEWS
September 23, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
For 74 years, the museum dedicated to the history of a city known for Benjamin Franklin, the Liberty Bell, and cheesesteaks was named for a radio-manufacturing magnate. Fred Ottaviano walked by, repeatedly. "I knew the Atwater Kent was about history, but I had no idea it was Philadelphia history," said Ottaviano, who lives two blocks away. "I never went in. " But on Saturday, Ottaviano and his wife, Pierrette, were among the 767 people who walked into the newly renovated museum to celebrate its grand reopening and new name.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Rafael Ferrer remembers the day all too well. At the end of February, he was speaking on the phone with Stanley I. Grand, director of the Lancaster Museum of Art and long a fan of Ferrer's sculptures, installations, and paintings. They were discussing the final logistics of a major Ferrer retrospective that Grand was curating, scheduled to open at his museum March 30 - a survey of the Puerto Rican-born, 78-year-old artist's works on paper, a vast collection of lush, mostly previously unseen images.
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