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Museum Director

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NEWS
September 25, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When he was a boy growing up in Brooklyn, Joel N. Bloom would often spend Saturdays at the American Museum of Natural History on Central Park. "One of my favorite exhibits was a magnificent Haida war canoe from the Northwest Coast. I would stand beside this canoe and think and dream," he said in a speech when he was president of the American Association of Museums. "I don't know if I would have become a scientist and then a museum director if that canoe had not inspired me. ". . . In a very real sense that canoe carried me here today.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2011 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
"Oh, my God, you guys! This ovarian cyst is larger than the last one," Sarah McCabe, a sophomore at the University of Delaware, called out to her fellow nursing students while examining specimens in the Gretchen Worden Gallery at the Mutter Museum. While the nurses-to-be gathered to stare at the beach-ball-size cyst, a portrait of the gallery's eponym presided over the gawking students. Worden would have been pleased. Until her death in 2004 from aplastic anemia at age 56, Worden was the director of the Mutter Museum and Historical Medical Library.
NEWS
September 28, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rowena R. Stewart, 83, of Jacksonville, Fla., a nationally known director of African American museums in Philadelphia and elsewhere, died Saturday, Sept. 19, of complications from a stroke at home. Between 1975 and 2002, when she retired to Florida, Dr. Stewart led four major African American historical museum societies - the Rhode Island Black Heritage Society, the Afro-American Historical and Cultural Museum in Philadelphia, the Motown Historical Museum in Detroit, and the American Jazz Museum in Kansas City, Mo. She was one of the most sought-after African American museum directors in the country, according to a profile posted on TheHistoryMakers.com.
NEWS
August 30, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
WILMINGTON, Del. - When Danielle Rice was appointed executive director of the Delaware Art Museum in 2005, she says she embraced the job because of "the challenge. " After 19 years as head of educational programs at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the last eight years as associate director of programs under museum director Anne d'Harnoncourt, Rice was eager to strike out on her own. "I thought I had a pretty good idea about what a museum director did," Rice recalled as she sat in her office Tuesday.
NEWS
October 13, 2007 | By John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Describing former Independence Seaport Museum president John S. Carter as a criminal in "a class by himself," a federal prosecutor yesterday said that Carter deserved a prison term befitting his extraordinary crimes - 15 to 19 years. Such a sentence would rank among the highest ever given in federal court in Philadelphia for a white-collar crime, and would be more than a decade longer than the likely term estimated by authorities when Carter was charged in May. Carter's attorney called the proposed sentence "preposterous.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
She was an art history major at Penn. He was a student of business at Wharton. One thing led to another, as it goes, and soon she gave him an old print of the university as a graduation gift. Then she bestowed a colorful Miro print on paper. And wouldn't you know? Next up was a print of Harvard, where he entered law school, as an engagement gift. So it was that Katherine and Keith Sachs began acquiring art, back in the 1960s. Needless to say, engagement led to a wedding.
NEWS
April 18, 2012 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Picture this: You're listening to a jazz concert or dancing at a wedding reception in a glass jewel box overlooking a sculpture garden. The backdrop is a 19th-century stone prison wall. You take a stroll through adjacent galleries filled with art by Pennsylvania Impressionists and Italian masters. That's the picturesque setting the James A. Michener Art Museum will unveil Wednesday evening in Doylestown, as it dedicates the Edgar N. Putman Event Pavilion. Three of the pavilion's walls are floor-to-ceiling, 23-foot-tall panels of glass made in Germany.
NEWS
November 10, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Philadelphia Museum of Art on Tuesday pulled off what had to be a first for the city: More than a hundred of Philadelphia's wealthiest, most culturally connected citizens gathered at the museum to celebrate the ground-breaking for a loading dock. Never have so many come to marvel at the site of future truck bays. Trumpets rang out. Smoked salmon-bearing waiters wove in and out of the crowd. At its center was impish, 81-year-old architect Frank Gehry, all in black, shock of white hair riffling in the breeze, confiding with a smile, "I'm just a little guy. " To be fair, all the hoopla was not simply for what the museum officially terms its new Art Handling Facility, about 68,000 square feet of new backstage space.
NEWS
June 23, 1998
You can see why, in choosing the site for tonight's Philadelphia Award presentation, event planners picked one honoree's home turf over the other's. For one thing, Anne d'Harnoncourt's Philadelphia Museum of Art is a great place for a gala. For another, it would have been mighty difficult staging the ceremony high atop an outdoor scaffolding - even if that is where the other recipient does some of her best work. In twinning this year's awardees - Jane Golden, artistic director of the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program, and Ms. d'Harnoncourt, the museum's director and chief executive officer - the Philadelphia Award makes a wise statement about art and its role in shaping communities.
NEWS
October 3, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts president and CEO Edward T. Lewis will step down at the end of the calendar year, the school and museum announced yesterday. David R. Brigham, 45, will succeed him. Brigham, who started as the academy's museum director when Lewis took over in 2007, has been appointed the new president and CEO, beginning Jan. 1. The change, both said yesterday, was timed so that Brigham could be in office when the academy presents its new strategic plan to the board in March.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 15, 2016 | Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
Harry Philbrick, head of the museum of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, will step down next month to explore establishing a nonprofit organization to study the multiple relationships between contemporary visual art and performance, the academy announced Wednesday. "It's really something I've been thinking about for a long time," Philbrick said. "I've accomplished a lot of what I set out to do [at PAFA] . . . and it seems that now it is time to move on. " His resignation is effective Feb. 11. "Harry Philbrick has been a great champion of PAFA's museum and has advanced every aspect of its mission," said PAFA president and chief executive David R. Brigham.
NEWS
September 28, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rowena R. Stewart, 83, of Jacksonville, Fla., a nationally known director of African American museums in Philadelphia and elsewhere, died Saturday, Sept. 19, of complications from a stroke at home. Between 1975 and 2002, when she retired to Florida, Dr. Stewart led four major African American historical museum societies - the Rhode Island Black Heritage Society, the Afro-American Historical and Cultural Museum in Philadelphia, the Motown Historical Museum in Detroit, and the American Jazz Museum in Kansas City, Mo. She was one of the most sought-after African American museum directors in the country, according to a profile posted on TheHistoryMakers.com.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Brandywine River Museum in Chadds Ford has landed the first plums from the bequest of billionaire publisher Richard Mellon Scaife, who died in July and left his collection of more than 500 artworks to the Brandywine and the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg, Pa. The two museums began selecting paintings Wednesday as if choosing sides for a pickup ball game: They made alternating picks. Team Brandywine, led by museum director Thomas Padon, chose five oil paintings: Martin Johnson Heade's New Jersey Salt Marsh (no date)
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
That an expansive exhibition of work by painter Charles Burchfield is about to open at a Philadelphia-area museum is not an everyday event. Burchfield, who died in 1967, may not be well known here - he lived in Ohio and upstate New York - but he is considered one of the finest watercolorists ever to ply the trade in North America. "Breathtaking," wrote critic Christopher Knight of a 2009 Burchfield exhibition in Los Angeles. For Philadelphia, the exhibition is certainly welcome because it is unusual.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
She was an art history major at Penn. He was a student of business at Wharton. One thing led to another, as it goes, and soon she gave him an old print of the university as a graduation gift. Then she bestowed a colorful Miro print on paper. And wouldn't you know? Next up was a print of Harvard, where he entered law school, as an engagement gift. So it was that Katherine and Keith Sachs began acquiring art, back in the 1960s. Needless to say, engagement led to a wedding.
NEWS
December 14, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John J. Craft, 77, of Devon, a former museum director and educator, died Sunday, Dec. 8, of lung disease at Bryn Mawr Hospital. A Civil War history buff, Mr. Craft was drawn to the Civil War Library and Museum in Philadelphia, where he was executive director from 1995 to 1999. He started with the museum in 1983, organizing exhibits and doing research. Later, he helped establish a volunteer board of governors, on which he served. Mr. Craft's first career was in public education.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
For 15 years, John Seitter's business has been about attracting, entertaining, and educating patrons of historic sites and tourist destinations. Before that, he tended bar and held other service jobs at the old Sands Hotel & Casino in Atlantic City. In his new post as executive director of the Roebling Museum in Burlington County, he's using two careers' worth of skills - and learning new ones. "This is the first real museum I've ever run," says Seitter, 56, of Brigantine, who previously ran the Camden County Historical Society and South Jersey Tourism Corp., both in Camden.
NEWS
August 30, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
WILMINGTON, Del. - When Danielle Rice was appointed executive director of the Delaware Art Museum in 2005, she says she embraced the job because of "the challenge. " After 19 years as head of educational programs at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the last eight years as associate director of programs under museum director Anne d'Harnoncourt, Rice was eager to strike out on her own. "I thought I had a pretty good idea about what a museum director did," Rice recalled as she sat in her office Tuesday.
NEWS
August 24, 2013 | By Theodore Schleifer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gillian Wakely, 67, of Center City, the longtime head of education programming at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, died Wednesday, Aug. 14, of colon cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Ms. Wakely worked at the museum for 40 years, most of which she spent as head of its education department. She managed nearly 80 volunteer guides. A native of London, Ms. Wakely grew up viewing collections at the British Museum. When she moved to Philadelphia at 26 and visited the Penn museum for the first time, she was immediately captivated by the collections, she wrote in a letter published in the museum's magazine.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Without fanfare, the Philadelphia Museum of Art has opened its new two-floor art-handling facility - 62,000 square feet hewn from schist and granite deep beneath the museum's Fairmount knoll. Begun in November 2010 at the base of the facade facing the Schuylkill, the $81 million facility was substantially completed by October 2012, about $5 million below budget. Though not everything is quite finished, it has been increasingly busy in recent months. This bit of practical engineering - the workaday heart that pumps life through the museum's public spaces - represents the complicated, all but invisible answer to a difficult question: How to add to the existing 600,000 square feet of self-contained neoclassical stone set atop a hill?
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