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Mushroom Festival

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NEWS
September 6, 2007 | By Don Beideman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A dance for teenagers and an antiques sale and auction are two events that have been added to this weekend's 22d annual Mushroom Festival in Kennett Square. "One of the complaints that we've had in the past was that there was nothing for teens," said Kathi Lafferty, volunteer coordinator for the festival and owner of the borough's Mushroom Cap store. A disc jockey will provide music beginning at 7 p.m tomorrow. The band Octobre will play during a break. The festival is scheduled to open at 5 p.m. with the dedication of the borough water tower, which has been painted to proclaim Kennett Square the "mushroom capital of the world.
NEWS
September 16, 1996 | By Rachel Smolkin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sunday brunch sizzles in the pan. The chef slices cheese on the counter, and flowers adorn the table. It looks just like any other Sunday-morning scene. Until you take a step closer. Next to the flowers stands an unusual display - a layered arrangement of portobellos and a cluster of yellow oyster mushrooms. Those traditional Sunday foods such as omelets and pancakes are nowhere in sight. Upon closer examination, the sizzling pan turns out to hold crimini mushrooms. At tables and on benches, friends and families chat and laugh.
NEWS
September 9, 1993 | For The Inquirer / J. MICHAEL McDYRE
For Lorenzo Murillo, a successful display of mushroom picking is capped off with a trophy. The first-place picker also received $200 as the annual Mushroom Festival began Saturday in Kennett Square to mark National Mushroom Month.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
The place: La Michoacana, 231 E. State St., Kennett Square, 610-444-2996. The deal: Homemade ice cream in flavors inspired by the Mexican palate, including avocado, corn, cantaloupe, coconut and banana. A small cup (two scoops) costs $2.50. Homemade frozen pops and bolis (push-ups) start at $1.50 and come in even more interesting flavors. Think spicy mango, rompope (eggnog), pico de gallo, cajeta (a thick, sweet, caramelized milk) and tropical fruits like tamarind, guava, passion fruit and nance.
NEWS
September 15, 1994 | By Edward A. Robinson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When mushroom people gather here during the next two weeks for their ninth annual mushroom festival, they will have something special to celebrate - an increase in mushroom prices over last year. During the 1993-94 crop year, growers enjoyed the highest wholesale prices for fresh mushrooms in 11 years. Prices rose 4 cents per pound compared with 1992-93, from 99 cents to $1.03, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The price for processed mushrooms jumped 8 cents per pound, from 58 cents to 66 cents, according to the USDA.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2004 | By Dana Reddington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kennett Square celebrates its most famous inhabitants with a two-day tribute to all things mushroom. The 19th annual Mushroom Festival will fill the streets of the Chester County town with music, arts and crafts, and plenty of food. Local growers will show how the mushrooms are cultivated, and chefs will demonstrate ways to cook with them. Children's activities include a moon bounce, Ferris wheel, carousel, jugglers and magicians. The Chester County Radio Control Club will perform an electric aircraft show on Sunday, and an antique-car show will parade into town on Saturday.
NEWS
August 12, 1993 | By Jeff Eckhoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Several hundred people took a weekend break Saturday to try something a bit different in food and entertainment. The first Kennett Area Unity Day in the Park was pronounced a rousing success this week by its organizers, who engineered a four-hour multicultural party that featured a total of eight ethnic food vendors and a dozen acts from across the cultural spectrum. "I think it went better than any of us expected," said Bill Buffington, chairman of the Kennett Area Human Services Committee, which sponsored the event.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1998 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Don't know much about history. Don't know much biology. Don't know much about botany, either. Fortunately, the folks at the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society do know much about things that grow. This weekend's Harvest Show, the fall counterpoint to the society's springtime Philadelphia Flower Show, carries the theme "Did You Know . . . Harvest Trivia" at the Horticulture Center in Fairmount Park. There will be a game called Horticultural Pursuit that features gardening questions and answers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1997 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The plot thickens. Well, maybe not your plot, but surely at the plots tended by the 700 exhibitors who will display the fruits and vegetables of their labors at this weekend's Harvest Show in Fairmount Park. The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's show - the fall counterpoint to the springtime Philadelphia Flower Show - pays homage this year to the artists, explorers, philosophers and gardeners of the 14th through 17th centuries. Children can enjoy pumpkin painting (11 a.m. to 4 p.m.)
NEWS
September 13, 1987 | By Vanessa Herron, Inquirer Staff Writer
"By giving me this title, I would be full of excitement . . . and pass my enthusiasm for mushrooms on to all others that I would meet. " - Amy Bartlewski, 18 West Grove The 24 young women who will assemble at Wilmington's Sheraton Brandywine Inn Friday have a host of long-term goals: They want to be models, nurses, executive secretaries and congresswomen. But they share a single short-term aim: to be the first National Miss Mushroom Queen. The pageant, which is now sold out, is the kickoff for the second annual Mushroom Festival, a weeklong celebration in southern Chester County that includes an art show, mushroom cook-off, talent show, polo match and food festival.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 12, 2013
The place: La Michoacana, 231 E. State St., Kennett Square, 610-444-2996. The deal: Homemade ice cream in flavors inspired by the Mexican palate, including avocado, corn, cantaloupe, coconut and banana. A small cup (two scoops) costs $2.50. Homemade frozen pops and bolis (push-ups) start at $1.50 and come in even more interesting flavors. Think spicy mango, rompope (eggnog), pico de gallo, cajeta (a thick, sweet, caramelized milk) and tropical fruits like tamarind, guava, passion fruit and nance.
TRAVEL
August 21, 2011
10 for the Road 1. Mushroom Festival. Kennett Square, Pa. Sept. 9-11. Dive into the mushroom capital of the world with a festival celebrating the fungus. Features a growers' exhibition, culinary tent, community parade, street fair, 5K run, and entertainment for children. 610-925-3373; www.mushroomfestival.org . 2. The Chile Pepper Food Festival. Bowers, Pa. Sept. 9-11. Everything chile peppers: a field excursion, salsa contest, and eating contest with live music.
NEWS
April 13, 2010 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If Kennett Square conjures up images of shiitakes, portobellos, and creminis, you may not be hip to its newest accolades. While the quaint borough earned international notice years ago as the world's mushroom capital, fungi aren't its only coveted commodity of late. In December, US Airways magazine listed Talula's Table - which boasts a yearlong wait for a reservation - as one of 16 optimal dining experiences in the country. In February, the Kennett Area YMCA snagged honors as the best Y in the nation.
NEWS
September 23, 2007 | By Don Beideman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A few years ago, Kennett Square Mayor Leon Spencer spent time during a break from his teaching duties at the Tatnall School in Delaware to work in the mushroom industry. His experience ranged from laboring in the dark, hot mushroom houses to working in an industry laboratory. "I wanted to get a sense of the industry," said Spencer, mayor of the town that proudly declares itself "the mushroom capital of the world," although many mushroom farms are situated outside Kennett Square.
NEWS
September 6, 2007 | By Don Beideman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A dance for teenagers and an antiques sale and auction are two events that have been added to this weekend's 22d annual Mushroom Festival in Kennett Square. "One of the complaints that we've had in the past was that there was nothing for teens," said Kathi Lafferty, volunteer coordinator for the festival and owner of the borough's Mushroom Cap store. A disc jockey will provide music beginning at 7 p.m tomorrow. The band Octobre will play during a break. The festival is scheduled to open at 5 p.m. with the dedication of the borough water tower, which has been painted to proclaim Kennett Square the "mushroom capital of the world.
NEWS
September 4, 2005 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As mushroom festivals go, it is probably one of the biggest and best-known in the country. Kennett Square calls itself the mushroom capital of the world, so no wonder there are mushroom cook-offs, mushroom exhibits, even mushroom ice cream. Organizers say about 100,000 visitors are expected to jam State Street Saturday and next Sunday for the 20th annual Mushroom Festival in Kennett Square. They come from all over. Two years ago, the Food Network featured the little borough's festival as the ultimate in mushroom cuisine and a neat side trip to Longwood Gardens.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2004 | By Dana Reddington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kennett Square celebrates its most famous inhabitants with a two-day tribute to all things mushroom. The 19th annual Mushroom Festival will fill the streets of the Chester County town with music, arts and crafts, and plenty of food. Local growers will show how the mushrooms are cultivated, and chefs will demonstrate ways to cook with them. Children's activities include a moon bounce, Ferris wheel, carousel, jugglers and magicians. The Chester County Radio Control Club will perform an electric aircraft show on Sunday, and an antique-car show will parade into town on Saturday.
NEWS
September 10, 2004 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Steve Parks wants to provide a megaphone for voices hardly heard. Voices speaking of disabilities. Of race relations. And, most recently, of migrant life in Kennett Square, where Mexican farmworkers endure back-breaking labor to sustain Chester County's thriving mushroom industry. His megaphone is the small, oft-struggling, mostly volunteer-run New City Community Press. As executive director, Parks makes it his mission to publish (with the help of grants and scraped-together donations)
NEWS
September 11, 2000 | By Jonathan Gelb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Fungi lovers lauded the virtues of the portobello and shiitake at this weekend's 14th annual Mushroom Festival, in what is billed as the mushroom capital of the nation. There were mushroom cooking competitions, exhibits on how mushrooms are grown, mushrooms for sale, mushroom magazines, and mushrooms sizzling and popping in frying pans at street-side stands. "You know, people are increasingly using portobellos on their barbecue grills," said Ruth Hall, an office worker at the Marlboro mushroom company, who sold mushrooms from a stand.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1999 | By Ciaran Sharpe, FOR THE INQUIRER
If there were a season for mushrooms, you might think it was late summer because of the fungi-happenings in Chester County. Pennsylvania is the country's leading mushroom grower, according to the state Agriculture Department, and the bulk of the 3.6 million pounds of mushrooms produced here comes from Chester County. As it turns out, there is no specific harvest for mushrooms. Crops are manipulated and picked several times a year. The farming process, which includes lots of compost and air-conditioning, is quite complex.
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