FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | By Monica Rhor INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even before it had a transmitter, Pan Asia Radio had a philosophy that set it apart from other radio stations: "Let us build a bridge to preserve our culture and traditions for the next generations. . . . " The ellipsis at the end was deliberate, meant to indicate a mission that was open-ended, said Grace Calvelo-Rustia, who founded the station with her husband in late 1996. The couple, both immigrants from the Philippines, weren't out to make money or score high on the Arbitron rating system.
NEWS
July 1, 1987 | By MARIANNE COSTANTINOU, Daily News Nightlife Writer
It was almost like a real concert at a real concert hall, with dozens of fans lingering out front and scalpers playing the crowd like pickpockets in Rome. Welcome to the Chestnut Cabaret, the legendary nightclub with the misleading address of 3801 Chestnut St. The brick building is really on a street with no sign, between Chestnut and Market. And as for the name, the cavernous room hardly confirms the coffehouse image of a cabaret, what with its prominent stage lights and its dozen color TV monitors overhead.
NEWS
November 23, 1988 | By Neal Thompson, Special to The Inquirer
"Father" John D'Amico - the former Philadelphia priest turned jazz performer - said it best. "I like the idea of the collaboration of the arts, not a separation," said the electric piano player following a performance at Quincy's at the Gaslight Inn in Mount Holly last Thursday. And representational artist Tom Williams, whose paintings will adorn Quincy's walls for the next month, said, "It's a good melding of jazz and paintings about jazz. It shows a love for music and the art within the music.
NEWS
October 10, 2010 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Sister Mary McNulty is taking inventory of a sort, ticking off a list of frailty, desultory home life, and human ruin. One girl, a sixth grader, has a father who works in a deli until midnight, so it's her job to make sure her little sister finishes homework before putting her to bed. There's the boy who sits in the public library until closing every night because no one is at home, and another who wasn't doing homework because the electricity had...
NEWS
June 27, 2007
MY HUSBAND and I were recently treated to a trip to Philadelphia by our children for our 30th anniversary. We stayed at the Sofitel. We took walks and went to Rittenhouse Square. I live in a suburb of Baltimore, Md., and was so impressed by this park. How wonderful it was. very diverse and lovely. We especially enjoyed the music. We enjoyed it so much that we stayed for over an hour to listen. We were told there was a clamor to get the music stopped. Please don't let them do this.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2012 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
No wonder the title has an exclamation point! Loud and colorful and wildly energetic, the bio-musical Fela! , about the Nigerian revolutionary and musician, has electrified audiences all over the world. With a sensational band onstage playing Fela Anikulapo-Kuti's music, direction and choreography by Bill T. Jones (who won a 2009 Tony Award for this show), and a big cast of dancers spectacularly costumed, it's a vigorous reinvention of musical theater, inspired by Stephen Hendel.
NEWS
June 26, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The often-fruitful marriage between music and poetry hits potentially fascinating snags with Philip Levine. The so-called working man's poet - whose expansive verses are filled with visions of Detroit in the snow and the sounds of Charlie Parker - is the focal point of The Crossing's Month of Moderns festival, which begins Sunday. The choir's ultra-literate founder/director Donald Nally seeks out combustible pairings of words and composer. Few poems, however, are as sturdy and self-sufficient as Levine's, which have won the Pulitzer Prize and any number of other awards.
NEWS
October 30, 2011
First the Music, Then the Words By Riccardo Muti Afterword by Marco Grondona Translated from the Italian by Alta L. Price Rizzoli. 243 pp. $29.95 Reviewed by Daniel Webster When Riccardo Muti, his transformational years with the Philadelphia Orchestra explosively behind him, strode to the podium of Italy's La Scala opera house in 1986, musicians and listeners alike cheered that Il Sceriffo , as an Italian newspaper dubbed him, had come. The avenging sheriff he was, the enforcer, almost alone among peers, his six-shooters aimed at those who sang the high E-flat instead of the B-flat Verdi had written, and at directors and singers who wanted to "improve" any operatic ür-text.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
"August Rush" is a would-be fairy tale about an orphan who follows his own drummer, his own cellist, and his own guitarist to a reunion with his musician parents. It has a clunky tone that teeters between musical mysticism and a much grittier account of life on the New York streets, where the boy goes to find his folks. It's directed by Kristen Sheridan, Jamey's kid, and she no doubt got this job for her role in blending the magical with the real in the wonderful immigrant saga "In America.
NEWS
July 17, 1995 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / VICKI VALERIO
Despite the hot weather, the sixth annual Singer/Songwriter Weekend at Penn's Landing went ahead as scheduled over the weekend with a wide variety of music. Yesterday was the swan song.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Ernest Stuart - trombonist, entrepreneur, and organizer of the Center City Jazz Festival - stopped as he darted up the stairs at Fergie's Pub Saturday to check on one of the acts. The day so far had been a blur of activity. The events had sold out, the clubs were packed, and simply keeping up had become a challenge. Mayor Nutter was grabbing a late lunch at Time as jazz trumpeter Charles Washington played to an overflow crowd, and he was sending Stuart encouraging texts.
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everything about this South Philly rock band is unlikely. Consider: its budget is zero, and all of its gear is donated. None of its musicians had picked up an instrument until recently, and some have yet to hit puberty. But Home, the remarkable Andrew Jackson Elementary School rock band, has jammed with - and drawn plaudits from - major stars. It has played before audiences of thousands. And when the nine-member ensemble finishes a crisp, enthusiastic version of "Little Talks," the Of Monsters and Men song, the audience is on its feet, cheering.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
There's not much to Montgomery Theater's production of The Musical of Musicals (The Musical!) , and yet there's so much to like about this silly spoof that takes one familiar story line and stretches it across the latter two-thirds of the 20th-century musical stage. It doesn't hurt that director/choreographer Stephen Casey assembled a top-notch quartet of performers and one seriously indefatigable pianist to carry the show-folk in-jokes all the way to curtain. Written by Eric Rockwell and Joanne Bogart, The Musical of Musicals skewers 51/2 prime cuts from Broadway's most sacred cows to make for one longish comic kebab.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
In its first two years, the story of the Center City Jazz Festival tended to focus on its precarious financial situation. Less than two months before the inaugural event in 2012, trombonist and founder Ernest Stuart still had his fingers crossed that his Kickstarter campaign would make his vision for the festival a reality. Last year, late funding came through that allowed a repeat performance and pianist Orrin Evans' Peco-sponsored headlining concert at UArts' Arts Bank Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON - Nearly six hours of 18th-century French comedy - The Figaro Plays , currently at the McCarter Theater - could feel epic. But no. Though the servant-versus-master stories in Pierre Beaumarchais' The Barber of Seville and The Marriage of Figaro portray a world amid revolutionary transition, the touch is light, the manner is sparkling. And before you know it, these characters have given you an uproarious and useful handbook on white lies, productive deception, and the renewability of love, ending with an elegant full-cast fandango, because, in case you've forgotten, life is but a dance.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Take your pick. World Cafe Live in Philadelphia and World Cafe Live at the Queen in Wilmington will have children's concerts to keep the kids rocking. In Philadelphia, Alex and the Kaleidoscope Band, whose music received praise in People magazine, will get the kids jumping with their "Paul Simon meets the Beatles on the playground" sound. Audience members can enjoy a communal experience dancing to the group's high-energy performance while learning life lessons. In Wilmington, songwriter and Parents' Choice winner Billy Jonas, who describes his sound as funky folk music for the whole family, will use found objects to help the audience discover the music within the objects and also within themselves.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE LAST OF his kind leads his family on a perilous voyage, with a distinct environmental message - "Rio 2" is "Noah" with funkier music. Bruno Mars contributes a song, as does Janelle Monae, but I was partial to Kristin Chenoweth singing "Poisonous Love" - a ballad that a tree frog sings to her would-be cockatoo boyfriend. The soundtrack and the songs are supervised by Sergio Mendes, who, working with director Carlos Saldanha, has shaped the sequel as a full-on musical, perhaps to capture some of that music/movie "Frozen" synergy.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Mister Mann Frisby, For the Daily News
* IN PERFORMANCE AT THE WHITE HOUSE: WOMEN OF SOUL. 9 p.m. Monday, WHYY12. WASHINGTON, D.C. - On a blustery March morning, the heat was turned way up inside the White House as first lady Michelle Obama welcomed more than 120 students (including 20 from Olney Charter High) to celebrate "Women of Soul. " First came an interactive student workshop in the State Dining Room - "I'm Every Woman: The History of Women in Soul. " That evening, some major figures in that history strutted their soulful stuff at a concert that was filmed to air Monday night.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
FOR AWHILE last night, hundreds of audience members were left in the dark during an April Fools' Day performance of "Phantom of the Opera. " The power outage was no prank. The Academy of Music show on the national tour of the iconic musical was seven minutes in and about to start the musical number "Think of Me" when audience members heard a popping sound. "And all the lights went out," said one attendee, who spoke with the Daily News from the show on her cellphone on condition of anonymity.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2014 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
This is a love story. It's also a dance story, one that began in Dresden, Germany, in 1994. Its middle is happening here in Philadelphia, now. The lovers are award-winning artists, collaborators onstage and in real life - husband and wife Niki Cousineau and Jorge Cousineau, founders of the dance company Subcircle. Their new ensemble work All this happened, more or less , opens Thursday night at the Performance Garage. The story of their life and work together, its title is the opening line of Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse 5 . The novel's key event is the World War II firebombing of Dresden in which 130,000 people died - bombings Jorge's grandparents survived.
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