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NEWS
January 12, 1986 | By Bob Allen, Special to The Inquirer
Like most cities that have been romanticized in the popular imagination, Nashville (or "Music City, U.S.A.," as it is often called) is a city of surprises. It is a city that often pleasantly nurtures, while it provocatively challenges, whatever preconceived notions a visitor may have about it (particularly those who are expecting hay bales along Main Street, like Hee Haw, or to be greeted at the city limits by Dolly Parton!) Nashville is, at heart, a small but rapidly expanding Southern metropolis of a half million where the music business takes a back seat to more staid industries, such as insurance and publishing.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
You can call it power-bluegrass or country soul, but whatever you call it, Nashville's SteelDrivers have bushels of it, as they righteously displayed Thursday night at the Ardmore Music Hall, with supporting act Rootsology in tow. Led by Music City session cats Tammy Rogers (a fiddler known for gigs with Patty Loveless), bassist Mike Fleming (Holly Dunn), mandolinist Brent Truitt (Dolly Parton), and banjo player Richard Bailey (George Jones), the now-decade-old outfit found its groove when it brought on country-singing guitarist Gary Nichols.
SPORTS
December 30, 2012
COLLEGE FOOTBALL Date Bowl/Site FavoriteLine Tot. UnderdogTime DEC. 29 Armed Forces /Fort Worth Air Force 3 62 Rice 11:45 a.m. Fight Hunger /San Francisco Arizona St. 14 1/2 53 Navy4:00 Pinstriple /New York West Virginia4 72 1/2 Syracuse 3:15 Alamo /San Antonio Oregon St. 3 57 1/2 Texas6:45 Buffalo Wild Wings /Tempe Texas Christian 2 1/2 40 1/2 Michigan St. 10:15 DEC. 31 Music City /Nashville Vanderbilt 7 51 1/2 N. Carolina St.12:00...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2000 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Where have all the outlaws gone? Who in country music's current crop of moussed-up males would shoot a man in Reno just to watch him die? Where are the guys tough enough to do time in San Quentin, lionize their mamas in song, and declare themselves proud to be Okies from Muskogee? Nowhere, that's where. Johnny Cash and Merle Haggard are among the last of that rugged breed, iconoclastic voices that have no real heirs in today's sissified contemporary-country marketplace.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
SO, PHILLY loses another firefighter, after which Mayor Nutter states, "We must never forget the grave risks that these heroic public servants take every day at a moment's notice on behalf of us all. " Now living in Nashville, I read the Daily News every day on my Kindle and I find Mayor Nutter's statement somewhat ironic. As someone who used to live one block from where Capt. Michael Goodwin died protecting my old neighborhood, I urge Michael Nutter to never forget the words of his statement above when he tries to fight the salary arbitration case against the firefighters, or refers to the noble police force of my hometown.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2011
Noah and the Whale Although Noah and the Whale started in the same London folk scene that fostered Mumford & Sons and Laura Marling (who appeared on their first album), their third record takes a turn toward the anthemic. Last Night on Earth focuses less on acoustic guitars and love songs (or the breakup songs that dominated 2009's The First Days of Spring ) and more on keyboards and character sketches. It's a decidedly British sound, and an appealing one: Leader Charlie Fink has a way with a big chorus and with heartfelt enthusiasm, whether it's for the redemptive power of teenage rock-and-roll ("Give It All Back")
SPORTS
January 31, 2016 | By Sam Carchidi, STAFF WRITER
NASHVILLE - The new NHL All-Star Game format - a three-on-three mini-tournament - will liven up what has usually been 60 minutes of high-scoring boredom. That's the opinion shared by many of this year's participants, including Flyers captain Claude Giroux. "I think it's going to be more entertaining," Giroux said Friday at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville. "There's more ice with the three-on-three, and fans want to see players play a little harder, try a little harder. The guys obviously don't want to get hurt [because]
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2013 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in Toronto, Lindi Ortega got her love of country music from her mother. "She had a big crush on Kris Kristofferson," the 33-year-old singer and songwriter recalls from a tour stop in Kingston, Ontario. "She used to listen to a lot of Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn, Merle Haggard, Waylon Jennings. . . . Then the older I got the more drawn to the genre I was. I think it had a lot to do with the lyrical content. A lot of Hank Williams was heartbreak, lonely, hurting, tear-in-your-beer kind of songs that just resonated with me. " Once she heard Outlaw country and Johnny Cash, "it was all over.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2015 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
'I was always an independent artist stuck on a major label," Lee Ann Womack says over the phone from her home in Nashville. The singer is discussing the circumstances behind her latest album, The Way I'm Livin' , which is the East Texas native's first for an independent label after a distinguished career in the mainstream with MCA Nashville. Over those years with MCA, Womack, 48, managed to enjoy some great commercial success with hits such as "I Hope You Dance" while maintaining artistic integrity, hewing close to the classic country she loves.
TRAVEL
September 21, 2015 | By Brendan Lowe, For The Inquirer
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Long ago, my mother told me about her former college roommate, who ate packets of butter. Whole packets. Not spread on bread, not in a series of nibbles, but all at once, like throwing back a piece of popcorn. I thought the tale was disgusting but also likely false, a story that grew legs over time. Until, that is, I ordered the Butter Tasting at Etch, a new restaurant in downtown Nashville. All at once, they arrived: malt vinegar butter, smoked Parmesan black pepper butter, ginger cashew butter - all made fresh in-house.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 22, 2016
Often thought of as the last bastions of hush, libraries are louder than one might have heard. So tune in and listen closely to Philadelphia's 300-plus-year musical legacy. Forsaking it in their religious services and sneering at it in their private lives, the Quaker founders of Philadelphia were a decidedly unmusical bunch. Fortunately for future ears, other religious and ethnic groups were counted among the city's early settlers, many with active musical traditions - and instruments - in tow. The mystic Johannes Kelpius and his small band of pietist pilgrims developed a sophisticated musical practice while living alone in the woods along the Wissahickon Creek near Germantown.
SPORTS
January 31, 2016 | By Sam Carchidi, STAFF WRITER
NASHVILLE - The new NHL All-Star Game format - a three-on-three mini-tournament - will liven up what has usually been 60 minutes of high-scoring boredom. That's the opinion shared by many of this year's participants, including Flyers captain Claude Giroux. "I think it's going to be more entertaining," Giroux said Friday at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville. "There's more ice with the three-on-three, and fans want to see players play a little harder, try a little harder. The guys obviously don't want to get hurt [because]
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
The first verse of the title track to Like a Rose , Ashley Monroe's 2013 album that announced the singer as one of the very best songwriters in Nashville, goes like this: "I was only 13 when Daddy died, Mama started drinking, and my brother just quit trying/ I'm still bouncing back, heaven only knows/ How I came out like a rose. " "Like a Rose" was not a strictly autobiographical song for Monroe, who headlines the World Cafe Live at the Queen in Wilmington on Friday in support of her new album, The Blade . For one thing, the song's heroine packs her bags and heads south from North Dakota, not Knoxville, Tenn., where Monroe grew up. But the song, which was the product of a cowriting session with Guy Clark and Jon Randall, is shot through with emotional truth for the now-29-year-old Monroe, who moved to Music City with her mother when she was 15, two years after her father died of pancreatic cancer.
TRAVEL
September 21, 2015 | By Brendan Lowe, For The Inquirer
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Long ago, my mother told me about her former college roommate, who ate packets of butter. Whole packets. Not spread on bread, not in a series of nibbles, but all at once, like throwing back a piece of popcorn. I thought the tale was disgusting but also likely false, a story that grew legs over time. Until, that is, I ordered the Butter Tasting at Etch, a new restaurant in downtown Nashville. All at once, they arrived: malt vinegar butter, smoked Parmesan black pepper butter, ginger cashew butter - all made fresh in-house.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
You can call it power-bluegrass or country soul, but whatever you call it, Nashville's SteelDrivers have bushels of it, as they righteously displayed Thursday night at the Ardmore Music Hall, with supporting act Rootsology in tow. Led by Music City session cats Tammy Rogers (a fiddler known for gigs with Patty Loveless), bassist Mike Fleming (Holly Dunn), mandolinist Brent Truitt (Dolly Parton), and banjo player Richard Bailey (George Jones), the now-decade-old outfit found its groove when it brought on country-singing guitarist Gary Nichols.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2015 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
'I was always an independent artist stuck on a major label," Lee Ann Womack says over the phone from her home in Nashville. The singer is discussing the circumstances behind her latest album, The Way I'm Livin' , which is the East Texas native's first for an independent label after a distinguished career in the mainstream with MCA Nashville. Over those years with MCA, Womack, 48, managed to enjoy some great commercial success with hits such as "I Hope You Dance" while maintaining artistic integrity, hewing close to the classic country she loves.
SPORTS
December 31, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
SO THE moment that college football junkies have been clamoring for, for way too long, finally is coming to a television screen near you: tomorrow's inaugural FBS playoff semifinals. Can there really be a much better way to ring in another year, especially now that the Eagles won't be playing any games that counts for 9 months? It almost reminds you of the old days, when Jan. 1 meant 12 straight hours of matchups that mostly meant everything. Of course, the next 2 years the semis are on Dec. 31, but you get the concept.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
HOW HOT is country music in our urbane metropolis? On Monday, Upper Darby's Tower Theater will be honored with just one of four national tour stops for " 'Nashville' in Concert," featuring the singing/strumming cast from the ABC-TV prime-time drama with lotsa music. "We're just getting our feet wet, testing the waters in a few friendly towns," said cast member Chris Carmack, who plays handsome hunk Will Lexington. Five days later, guitar-wailing country popster Hunter Hayes will conclude his record-breaking (he hopes)
NEWS
April 11, 2013
SO, PHILLY loses another firefighter, after which Mayor Nutter states, "We must never forget the grave risks that these heroic public servants take every day at a moment's notice on behalf of us all. " Now living in Nashville, I read the Daily News every day on my Kindle and I find Mayor Nutter's statement somewhat ironic. As someone who used to live one block from where Capt. Michael Goodwin died protecting my old neighborhood, I urge Michael Nutter to never forget the words of his statement above when he tries to fight the salary arbitration case against the firefighters, or refers to the noble police force of my hometown.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2013 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in Toronto, Lindi Ortega got her love of country music from her mother. "She had a big crush on Kris Kristofferson," the 33-year-old singer and songwriter recalls from a tour stop in Kingston, Ontario. "She used to listen to a lot of Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn, Merle Haggard, Waylon Jennings. . . . Then the older I got the more drawn to the genre I was. I think it had a lot to do with the lyrical content. A lot of Hank Williams was heartbreak, lonely, hurting, tear-in-your-beer kind of songs that just resonated with me. " Once she heard Outlaw country and Johnny Cash, "it was all over.
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