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Music Department

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NEWS
March 21, 1993 | By Gloria A. Hoffner and Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
The Ridley High School music department has scheduled a jazz concert for 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at the school, 1001 Morton Ave., Folsom. Admission is $3 for adults and $1 for students and senior citizens. Among the selections to be performed are "On Broadway," "Someone to Watch Over Me" and "God Bless the Child. " The Delaware County Press Club's 11th Annual Communications Day is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. April 1 at Delaware County Community College. It is open to all Delaware County high school students who are active in their school newspapers, literary magazines or yearbook staffs.
NEWS
February 9, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Andrei Fritz was itching to let loose a torrent of drumming that could be heard in the classroom upstairs and by passersby in the hallway outside. But there was a problem. "Uhh, there's no power," said Fritz, 21, crouched down and looking at a thick black cable. Oops. "On any of them?" asked Jeffrey Hiatt, a head engineer and staff producer at Turtle Studios in Philadelphia. Something wasn't working right, but Hiatt was unfazed. What better dose of reality for a group of Rowan University students learning about the music industry?
NEWS
November 19, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Italo Taranta, 86, of Drexel Hill, a music teacher, composer, and choral director, died Tuesday, Nov. 4, of complications from Alzheimer's disease at home. Born in Paganica in southern Italy, Mr. Taranta came to the United States as an infant and settled with his parents in southeastern Ohio before moving to Michigan. His parents had a difficult relationship; he escaped into the solace of music, although he struggled for years with migraine headaches and depression. "Rarely was there ever a person more passionate about something than my dad was about classical music.
NEWS
February 8, 1988 | By David Lee Preston, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eric Mandell, a refugee from Nazi Germany who founded the music department at Gratz College, established a major collection of Jewish music and served as a composer, music director and teacher, died Saturday at the Philadelphia Geriatric Center. He was 85. Mr. Mandell lived at the Philadelphian in the city's Fairmount section. Born in Gronau, Westphalia, he studied at a cantorial institute in Muenster, Westphalia, and at a music school in Dusseldorf. Mr. Mandell was working as cantor and music director of the Synagogue Bochum, in Westphalia, when he was arrested by the Nazis and placed in a concentration camp in Germany.
NEWS
June 8, 1988 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Libraries have always asked that their visitors conduct themselves pianissimo, but increasingly the institutions themselves are coming across fortissimo with their pride in their expanding music collections. And now, the Free Library of Philadelphia is adding a program to its lending repertoire: compact discs. For years, the library has had circulating collections of records - everything from opera to pop and Broadway - and a growing list of recorded books. The CD idea will get a boost this week from a dinner and concert that library officials expect will raise $10,000 toward starting that collection.
NEWS
May 18, 1986 | By Vic Skowronski, Special to The Inquirer
The Cherry Hill High School West music department marched away with all but one of the top honors last weekend at a national competition. In Boston, the 60-member marching band took first place at the Heritage Festival in overall competition. The band also was chosen for having the best drum majors, best fronts overall (flags and pompon carriers), best band front in parade, best band front in field marching and best field marching band overall. Bridget Elbert, a West senior, and Christopher Marino, a junior, were named the best drum majors.
NEWS
December 9, 1993 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Last spring, the theater and music departments at West Chester University agreed to collaborate on a one-act music theater piece for the 1993-94 school year. The dates for the rehearsals and performances - it opens tonight - were even scheduled. There was only one other detail to be worked out: the production itself. It hadn't been written yet. Robert Maggio, an assistant professor in the music department, planned to write the music, and an outline was developed for the story.
NEWS
August 18, 1992 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Clyde R. Dengler, 93, of Upper Darby, who crowned a career in music and politics by directing the Sunshine Singers, his own senior citizens' choir, in a White House concert, died Saturday at the Broomall Presbyterian Home. Dr. Dengler secured the invitation in 1983, when he was 84. "We are all getting up there and our voices are becoming less and less of what they used to be. We need some sort of climax performance, a final reward," he said at the time. He dashed off a letter to President Reagan, taking care to sprinkle it with the names of good Republicans - Faith Ryan Whittlesey, Richard Schweiker and William Scranton - he had met during the 18 years he was a state representative and senator.
NEWS
March 11, 1999 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER SUBARBAN STAFF
John H. Davison, 68, former chairman of Haverford College's music department and a composer of more than 150 classical works, died of cancer Friday at his home in Haverford. Professor Davison, who spent 40 years at Haverford, held the Ruth Marshall Magill Professorship in Music. Professor Davison was born in Istanbul, Turkey, of American parents. The Davisons returned to the United States in 1939 and settled in New York City. He graduated from Haverford College in 1951 and eight years later joined the college faculty.
NEWS
November 15, 1992 | By Kathi Kauffman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In 1978, the Josepher family opened Just for the Record in the bustling Rosemont Village Mall, hopeful that the area's large student population and suburban setting would prove fruitful for the record store. After thriving for a decade, the business hit a slowdown in the late 1980s, and other store owners in the mall retired or just closed their shops. Then came good news last year: Borders Book Shop was putting a superstore in the mall. With it, the Josephers thought, came the promise of new customers.
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NEWS
February 9, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Andrei Fritz was itching to let loose a torrent of drumming that could be heard in the classroom upstairs and by passersby in the hallway outside. But there was a problem. "Uhh, there's no power," said Fritz, 21, crouched down and looking at a thick black cable. Oops. "On any of them?" asked Jeffrey Hiatt, a head engineer and staff producer at Turtle Studios in Philadelphia. Something wasn't working right, but Hiatt was unfazed. What better dose of reality for a group of Rowan University students learning about the music industry?
NEWS
January 27, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stella Ferrari Conaway, 92, of West Chester, a respected voice teacher and performer, died Thursday, Jan. 8, her 61st wedding anniversary, of Alzheimer's disease at Simpson Meadows, Downingtown. Mrs. Conaway was a trained soprano, and her husband, Wayne Elias Conaway, a trained tenor; the two performed classical music and opera duets up and down the East Coast. The venues were local auditoriums where they often sang to benefit music clubs, he said. She earned academic degrees in music from the Philadelphia Conservatory of Music - now part of the University of the Arts - and joined the faculty of the music department at West Chester University.
NEWS
November 19, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Italo Taranta, 86, of Drexel Hill, a music teacher, composer, and choral director, died Tuesday, Nov. 4, of complications from Alzheimer's disease at home. Born in Paganica in southern Italy, Mr. Taranta came to the United States as an infant and settled with his parents in southeastern Ohio before moving to Michigan. His parents had a difficult relationship; he escaped into the solace of music, although he struggled for years with migraine headaches and depression. "Rarely was there ever a person more passionate about something than my dad was about classical music.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013
Returning from financial retrenchment of past seasons, Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia on Tuesday announced a four-year contract extension for music director Dirk Brossé and a new residency with Lincoln University, starting in the 2013-14 season. Brossé, 53, began his tenure in the 2010-11 season and is now committed through 2017-18. Though he has an international career as a guest conductor and film composer, he arrived, he said, elated to be part of the Philadelphia community. The orchestra's executive director, Peter Gistelinck, was thought to be taking a chance on the Flemish Belgian, who hadn't headed an orchestra for years, "but I knew Dirk for a very long time . . . and was confident that he could make it happen.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
ANOTHER DAY, another good deed by Taylor Swift . The cynics - and you know who you are - may say that the deed is tied to the Oct. 22 release of her next album, "Red," but it's not like Taylor needs the publicity. So, even those who look to see the worst in celebs have to tip our fedoras. Taylor is giving $10,000 and concert tickets to Boston's Horace Mann School for the Deaf after pranksters voted for the school in an online contest promising the winning school a Taylor Swift concert.
NEWS
November 23, 2011 | BY NATALIE POMPILIO, pompiln@phillynews.com 215-854-2595
FOUR YEARS AGO, the music department at South Philadelphia's Andrew Jackson School was a small, dingy room with an out-of-tune piano and some outdated textbooks. This was the scene on a recent morning: Ten students with acoustic guitars were strumming the Red Hot Chili Peppers' "Otherside" with the intensity of rock veterans. They were accompanied by others on the drums, the electric guitar and that good old piano. The music filled the spacious basement room, brightly painted by student muralists, and drifted to the streets above.
NEWS
February 4, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony Gene Mecoli, 78, of Glassboro, an educator, a musician, and the former artistic director of the Gloucester County Allegro Society Orchestra, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Tuesday, Feb. 1, at Gloucester Manor Nursing Home in Sewell. Several months after joining the music department at Gloucester County College in 1988, Mr. Mecoli told The Inquirer, "I wanted to do something to get the students here involved in music and develop an ongoing concert series that everyone in the area could enjoy.
NEWS
October 15, 2010 | By Bobby Olivier, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite a life devoted to music, Rowan University professor Bertram Greenspan chooses not to listen while driving. He can too easily become absorbed. "My whole training, which I try to get students to do, is, 'What did you hear?' So, if I am driving along and I hear music, I can find myself paying attention and not noticing the driving," he said last week in a rehearsal room on campus. Greenspan, a classically trained violinist, has been instructing students in musical theory and performance in Glassboro since 1961.
NEWS
August 24, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
HELEN SPRINGMAN's home in Levittown rang with the music of Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Chopin, Debussy and Liszt, played on her cherished Steinway Grand. She was a serious musician who polished and perfected her performances of classical and romantic-period music. However, not many people got to hear her play. She performed at recitals of her piano students, at college recitals, but she never had an interest in becoming a professional pianist, touring and playing around the world, which she might well have done.
NEWS
April 1, 2010 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
One morning not too long ago, staff arrived for work in the music room of the Central Library of the Free Library of Philadelphia to find that a lighting fixture had dropped from the ceiling and was dangling in midair, a pile of rubble beneath it. Eighteen months later, a new fixture is in - casting light on a substantially renovated music library with freshened ambitions. With almost $500,000 from the city and private sources, highly detailed plasterwork was redone, new lighting was fabricated, and more sophisticated computers and listening stations were installed.
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