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Music Director

ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2011 | BY SHAUN D. BRADY, For the Daily News
AS THE Quaker City String Band rehearsed the wooden soldier march of its latest routine on a chilly December evening, Jim Fox Jr. blended right into the horde of saxophonists playing through "Teddy Bears' Picnic" and "When Johnny Comes Marching Home. " But despite being one alto among many, Fox is responsible for an outsized portion of the cacophony being raised on the second floor of the venerable Mummers band's South Philly clubhouse. Probably half of the Quaker City saxophonists wouldn't be there on New Year's Day if it weren't for Fox. That's literally the case for two of them, Fox's college-age sons, who are carrying on the family tradition.
NEWS
June 24, 1999 | By Lubna Khan, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Peter DiMario worked after school, between cross-country meets and play practice, for months before he realized that no matter how much he worked, he would not make enough to go on a European tour with an area youth choir. "It sounds so cool to be on a European tour," said the 18-year-old. So he worked as a clerk at the auto tag agency for another year, and sold pizza and Easter flowers. Now he is preparing to leave Tuesday for the Netherlands and Belgium with Chester County Voices Abroad, a 24-member youth choir.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The final week of the Mann Music Center series will have been significant for three debuts, and two of them came last night. Mariss Jansons, the 48- year-old Latvian conductor, was making his first local appearance, as was his soloist, 38-year-old Russian emigre pianist Mikhail Rudy. Since both will return in the winter season, this was a preview for orchestra audiences. Jansons has been music director of the Oslo Philharmonic since 1979, and his recordings have been making his name known more widely.
NEWS
October 5, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Shostakovich's 1943 Symphony No. 8 is one in a handful of works that fathom the trauma of the 20th century with a boldness and originality so fearless that it's not often performed around here. However compelling Symphony in C's performance was on Saturday in Rutgers University-Camden's Gordon Theater, it went far to explain why: Once the steep musical challenges are met, you're entering a World War II-era abyss that not everyone (players or audience) can or will inhabit. Full of gargantuan war-inspired orchestral effects that prompt a visceral response from any alert musician, the symphony also requires a kind of life experience that the conservatory-age Symphony in C musicians can't be expected to have.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Bold emotions, boldly expressed, predominated last evening when Mariss Jansons, the music director of the Oslo (Norway) Philharmonic, conducted the Philadelphia Orchestra in a program of Shostakovich, Ravel and Elgar at the Academy of Music. With considerable aplomb, Jansons showed the measure of the febrile rituals expressed in Shostakovich's Symphony No. 6, one of the least expansive and most ambivalent of the composer's symphonic output. Chameleon-like, the piece changes posture and attitudes; indeed the stern unanimity with which the violas and cellos are called upon to introduce the score hardly prepares you for its later carnival-like explosions.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1997 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Mariss Jansons began his tenure as conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony Saturday, cheered on by a cohort of Norwegian fans and also by the players themselves. The 52-year-old music director-designate was greeted by a standing ovation at his first appearance, and after the last ripping chords of the Mahler Symphony No. 1, the audience was on its feet shouting, and the orchestra members were stomping their feet and applauding. The Latvian native has had the same effect in Norway, where he has been music director of the Oslo Philharmonic for 18 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2000 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Nobody is sure when Einojuhani Rautavaara will show up. The craggy 71-year-old composer who lives on an island near here with a minimum of modern conveniences had been expected for the European premiere of his Symphony No. 8 by the Philadelphia Orchestra a few days before in Cologne. He never showed. The affable but increasingly in-demand composer later explained: "In the evening of my so-called career . . . I have no time to compose anymore. " Fair enough. But the Helsinki premiere of the symphony last Sunday had a weighty significance; his schedule cleared.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1995 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Philadelphia Orchestra opened its 96th season Tuesday - its players, conductor and repertoire filling the flower-laden Academy of Music with swirling images and signals of new directions and old traditions, dynamism and stasis. Wolfgang Sawallisch, himself a symbol of durable energy and curatorial solidity, was on the podium to begin his third season as music director. Unlike other years in his reign, he was returning to his orchestra after only a brief separation, for he last conducted the ensemble Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Accustomed to continuity and long relationships, Philadelphia Orchestra listeners are confronting the end of their years with music director Riccardo Muti and the distant arrival of his successor, Wolfgang Sawallisch. Muti has conducted his final concerts here as music director, will close the New York season tomorrow at Carnegie Hall and then will lead the orchestra on a ceremonial three-week progress through Europe to Israel. Having laid aside the robes of office here, he will pull on those of the music director of La Scala on Tuesday in New York when he announces that company's tour of America in October, a tour that will include a performance of Verdi's Messa da Requiem at the Academy of Music here.
LIVING
January 14, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Though the classical music world has long lamented what might have been had Wolfgang Mozart lived beyond age 35, it doesn't often look closely at what really was - at least prior to the decade that produced his oft-heard masterpieces. And there are knowledgeable people who claim that early Mozart is best. I wouldn't go that far, but I was happy to see the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia delving into earlier symphonies and concerts (written from ages 16 to 21) Monday at the Kimmel Center, though that happiness didn't exactly survive the performances.
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