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Music Education

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NEWS
May 21, 1995 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael S. Giamo, 73, a former director of music education for the Philadelphia School District, died Friday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania after a brief illness. Mr. Giamo retired in 1984 after working in the school district for 32 years. He was conductor of the All-City Orchestra that performed annually with the All-City Choir at the Academy of Music. Mr. Giamo's music accomplishments were widely known. He had been a musician since childhood, when he and his twin brother, Louis, played at local music festivals and for the former Horn & Hardart's Children's Hour.
NEWS
June 20, 1993 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Carmen Culp, a music teacher at the Tredyffrin/Easttown Middle School, was selected by the Pennsylvania Music Educators Association to receive the Citation of Excellence Award. She was honored at the PMEA conference this spring. Culp was cited for her classroom style, as a recognized authority on the changing voice, and her involvement with musical theater productions and choral groups that involve more than 300 students annually. She is also a consultant and evaluator of music programs in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
March 30, 1994 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Senior Alicia Rogers said she endured a lot of teasing when she was younger. The words nerd and geek followed her around because she played the violin in middle school. "I enjoy playing, and I'm glad I stuck with it," Rogers said. "Playing in the orchestra is such a change from math or physics class. And one thing's for sure, we're not getting tested. " Rogers is one of about 60 students at Haverford High School who play in the orchestra and recently performed on "string night," which featured fifth through 12th graders.
NEWS
April 19, 1999 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Irving J. Maitin, 75, an architect and an avid supporter of music and music education, died after an extended illness Saturday at his home in Meadowbrook. Mr. Maitin was a partner in the Ewing Cole Cherry Brott architectural firm from 1966 until his retirement in 1994. Before that, he was a partner in Fruchtbaum & Maitin, architects and engineers, and worked with acclaimed Philadelphia architect Louis I. Kahn. Mr. Maitin was noted for his work on health-care facilities, including major projects for Abington Memorial Hospital, Chestnut Hill Hospital, Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center and Presbyterian Medical Center as well as general projects for PNB and CoreStates Bank and the Atlantic City Race Track.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
The orchestra's overture swells into the opening notes of Leonard Bernstein's haunting standard "Somewhere" from the award-winning Broadway musical West Side Story . Soon the harmonies of the choir seamlessly fold in, and the cascade of sound seems to literally descend from the rafters of Verizon Hall. It wasn't the Philadelphia Orchestra that gave goose bumps to a packed house Monday night. It was the All-Philadelphia High School Orchestra and Choir, which each year borrows the orchestra's Kimmel Center home to perform its High School Music Festival.
NEWS
November 2, 1993 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It has been more than two years since the sound of flat horns and sharp flutes filled the multipurpose room at Sharon Hill Elementary School. Budget cuts and fiscal responsibility forced the Southeast Delco School District to end its elementary instrumental music program in June 1991 and its middle school program a year later. This year, instrumental music is back, but with a twist. In a first-of-its-kind experiment for public schools, Southeast's parents rather than taxpayers are footing the bill, said Jack McGovern, director of curriculum and instruction.
NEWS
March 25, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
FYODOR BADKHEN, 17, has been part of Girard Academic Music Program for four years, but he didn't realize he would help the school win a Grammy - sort of. The South Philadelphia magnet school, known as GAMP, was one of 13 schools in the nation chosen by the GRAMMY Foundation for its Signature Schools Award and will receive $5,500. The annual award recognizes the best public high schools in music education. Eight of the 13 schools, including GAMP, received the Enterprise Award grant for schools that are economically underserved.
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
A leadership and administrative change in the School District of Philadelphia's venerable All City Music Festival could signal the start of the program's restoration. Project 440, the education group founded in 2006 by Philadelphia Orchestra assistant double bassist Joseph Conyers, is taking over management of the All City program from the School District. The legal aspects of the transfer may take months to complete, but a ceremonial handshake sealing the deal is planned on stage at this year's All City concert on Monday.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* HOUSE OF CARDS. Season 2 starts streaming on Netflix today. * 48 HOURS PRESENTS: THE WHOLE GRITTY CITY. 9 p.m. Saturday, CBS3. SO MAYBE Frank Underwood wouldn't be every woman's Valentine. But Frank (Kevin Spacey), the scheming, homicidal - and, oh, yeah, adulterous - politician at the very heart of Netflix's conspiratorial "House of Cards," doesn't need to please all of us. He really only needs to stay on the right side of his equally terrifying wife, Claire (Robin Wright)
NEWS
January 15, 1996 | Inquirer photographs by Charles Fox
Yesterday was the winter open house for the Academy of Community Music at St. Thomas Church in Whitemarsh. The day included workshops for young children, demonstrations and a concert by preschool and school-age musicians from the academy's Suzuki classes. The academy was founded in 1983 by violinist Robert DiPasquale of the Philadelphia Orchestra and his wife. It offers private lessons, music education for people of all ages, music therapy and an Academy of Children's Music.
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NEWS
May 7, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Samuel Russell Cosby Jr., 97, of Mount Airy, an organist, schoolteacher, and choral director who blended the sounds of the human voice into a melodic tapestry, died Monday, April 27, of a heart attack at his home. A Philadelphian who grew up on Godfrey Avenue, Mr. Cosby showed an early affinity and talent for music. He attended Corinthian Baptist Church along with the rest of his family, and shortly after his graduation from Central High School at age 19 became the organist for Mount Olivet Tabernacle Baptist Church.
NEWS
March 25, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
FYODOR BADKHEN, 17, has been part of Girard Academic Music Program for four years, but he didn't realize he would help the school win a Grammy - sort of. The South Philadelphia magnet school, known as GAMP, was one of 13 schools in the nation chosen by the GRAMMY Foundation for its Signature Schools Award and will receive $5,500. The annual award recognizes the best public high schools in music education. Eight of the 13 schools, including GAMP, received the Enterprise Award grant for schools that are economically underserved.
NEWS
March 7, 2015
ISSUE | MUSIC IN SCHOOLS Joyful sounds Nearly two years ago, I urged the School Reform Commission to save the in-school music program ("A rousing send-off," March 3). On Monday, hundreds of student musicians spoke in a powerful voice in their Kimmel Center performance about the value of music education. My friend Don Liuzzi has guided the all-city program for 10 years, and it is stunning to see the level of musicianship. If the School District can produce students like these, then there is indeed a bright future.
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
A leadership and administrative change in the School District of Philadelphia's venerable All City Music Festival could signal the start of the program's restoration. Project 440, the education group founded in 2006 by Philadelphia Orchestra assistant double bassist Joseph Conyers, is taking over management of the All City program from the School District. The legal aspects of the transfer may take months to complete, but a ceremonial handshake sealing the deal is planned on stage at this year's All City concert on Monday.
NEWS
January 24, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Matthew Johnson, 81, a longtime Philadelphia School District teacher, a vocalist, and a student of the Negro spiritual, died Monday, Jan. 5, of Parkinson's disease at Woodmont Center in Spotsylvania County, Va. Dr. Johnson made Philadelphia his home in 1963 and remained there until moving to Virginia in 2012. For almost 30 years, he taught in five city high schools and at the college level, retiring in 1991. Born in Bowling Green, Va., he graduated from Union High School before serving in the Army.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles Wilbert Hilliard McCabe, 72, of Yeadon, a longtime music scholar and teacher in the Philadelphia public schools, died Thursday, Nov. 13, of cardiac amyloidosis at his home. A child prodigy reared in South and then West Philadelphia, Dr. McCabe had memorized the city's major streets by age 6, began to study piano at age 3, and at 6 appeared in a musical program with the singer and actor Paul Robeson, his family said. His uncle Charles A. McCabe, a violinist and trailblazer for musicians of color, was the young Dr. McCabe's role model.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WILBERT McCABE memorized all the major streets of Philadelphia at age 6, took his first piano lessons at age 3 and performed with Paul Robeson at age 6. By 14, he was playing Grieg's Piano Concerto in a Philadelphia church. It was no wonder this brilliant child prodigy, musician and teacher had no problem remembering the birthdays of children, nieces and nephews, siblings, in-laws and friends. And the fact that every year he would send out 700 Christmas cards worldwide is not much of a surprise.
NEWS
October 27, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Lindsay's mom talked her into online dating. "You didn't meet anyone in college. You haven't met anyone at work. And you run a gay theater company. Where do you think you're going to meet people?" she asked. "She had a point," Lindsay admits. The now 29-year-old actor is also development and communications manager for Philadelphia Young Playwrights and cofounded the Mauckingbird Theatre Company as a vehicle for gay storytelling. She electronically winked at Matthew in November 2008.
NEWS
April 22, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everything about this South Philly rock band is unlikely. Consider: its budget is zero, and all of its gear is donated. None of its musicians had picked up an instrument until recently, and some have yet to hit puberty. But Home, the remarkable Andrew Jackson Elementary School rock band, has jammed with - and drawn plaudits from - major stars. It has played before audiences of thousands. And when the nine-member ensemble finishes a crisp, enthusiastic version of "Little Talks," the Of Monsters and Men song, the audience is on its feet, cheering.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* HOUSE OF CARDS. Season 2 starts streaming on Netflix today. * 48 HOURS PRESENTS: THE WHOLE GRITTY CITY. 9 p.m. Saturday, CBS3. SO MAYBE Frank Underwood wouldn't be every woman's Valentine. But Frank (Kevin Spacey), the scheming, homicidal - and, oh, yeah, adulterous - politician at the very heart of Netflix's conspiratorial "House of Cards," doesn't need to please all of us. He really only needs to stay on the right side of his equally terrifying wife, Claire (Robin Wright)
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