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FOOD
December 12, 2012 | By Emily Babay, Philly.com Staff Writer
Diners at the renovated Hard Rock Cafe in Center City can now get more of a taste of Philadelphia music history with their meals. In the new Philadelphia Room, patrons might sit beneath a shredded leather outfit worn by Philadelphia native Lisa "Left Eye" Lopes, the late TLC singer-songwriter, or handwritten lyrics to "I Hate Myself for Loving You" by Joan Jett, who grew up in Wynnewood. Plaques describe each item and the artist's connection to the Philadelphia area. "Philadelphia is such a rock-and-roll town," Hard Rock historian Jeff Nolan said during a morning tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Anyone looking for a quick overview of jazz history could take a crash course simply by checking out a few performances in Philly this weekend. Around the city, modern jazz artists are paying homage to a groundbreaking festival and some of the music's most pioneering artists, glancing back while moving determinedly forward. Saturday night at the Painted Bride Art Center, Philadelphia saxophonist and bandleader Bobby Zankel kicks off his three-night "Still the New Thing" festival with a concert celebrating his mentor, Cecil Taylor.
NEWS
October 24, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony Derf Nolde, 82, of North Wales, a former music professor at Rutgers University and pianist who for 20 years operated Nolde's Music Box in Flemington, N.J., and performed throughout the Northeast, died of heart failure Saturday, Sept. 25, at home. Mr. Nolde never regretted leaving academia after five years of teaching music history and composition, his family said. Though an educated man with a psychology degree and a master's in music, Mr. Nolde preferred a more bohemian lifestyle, traveling around the Eastern states, playing piano at small and large venues, sailing to the Caribbean on his own "to get away" for a few days, and smoking his signature corncob pipe.
NEWS
October 26, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jane Swan had a remarkable eyewitness source for her 1989 book, The Lost Children: A Russian Odyssey. Her first husband was Alfred P. Swan, a Red Cross worker who helped guide 800 Russian children far from the revolutionary chaos of St. Petersburg, starting in 1918. Alfred Swan, her music history professor at Swarthmore College, was the prime source for her master's thesis and doctoral dissertation at the University of Pennsylvania. Decades later, the book was based on those papers.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Writer Ted Swindley built his 1988 musical Always . . . Patsy Cline on the flimsiest foundation I've seen in a jukebox musical. Given the genre, that's saying a lot. Given that this production has sold the most advance ticket sales of any show in Bristol Riverside Theatre's history, I'm not sure it matters to any fan of Cline's music. Swindley based his two-act show on a true story, but even to call it a story is charitable. "Anecdote," maybe, or "single scene in a Cline biopic," or "footnote in music history that would interest no one . . . " The evening starts with Louise Seger (Jo Twiss)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1993 | By Peter Dobrin, FOR THE INQUIRER
There aren't many opportunities to hear 14th-century Italian music and American vaudeville on the same program - much less in the same piece. Yet Hesperus, the Washington-based trio, offered just that Monday night at the Settlement Music School's fourth "Music Mondays" concert of the year. Salterello/The Blues My Naughty Sweetie Gave to Me is two pieces in one - doubtless not the way their composers intended them to be heard. But the hybrid of ancient European music with American folk music - basically Hesperus' shtick - works exceedingly well.
NEWS
May 8, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Constantine Johns, 90, formerly of West Chester, a violist, conductor, and retired professor of music at West Chester University, died April 28 at Bear Creek Nursing Home in Morrison, Colo. He had moved to Golden, Colo., three years ago. During his more than 30-year career at West Chester, Dr. Johns chaired the Music History and Literature Department for several years, served as the university's director of cultural affairs and was vice president of the faculty senate. He retired in the late 1980s.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Motown the Musical packs its score with some of the greatest hitmakers in music history: the Jackson 5, Diana Ross and the Supremes, Stevie Wonder, Gladys Knight and the Pips, the Temptations, and the Commodores. As a story, though, it's missing only a cross for Motown records founder Berry Gordy to hang on. Gordy based the musical on his 1994 autobiography, To Be Loved: The Music, The Magic, The Memories of Motown . There's plenty of music and magic in the production now on tour at the Academy of Music; in addition to the bands or artists listed above, all the Motown records stars from the 1960s to 1980s get their 15 seconds of stage time in this 21/2-hour show (some, such as Teena Marie and Rick James, merely bookend a short-shrift collection of Motown's late-period hits)
NEWS
January 22, 2006 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sylvia Foodim Glickman, 73, pianist, composer, teacher, and tireless promoter of music by female composers, died Monday of lung cancer at her home in Bala Cynwyd. When Mrs. Glickman was growing up in New York, her mother enrolled her in music school at age 3. Five years later, she played with the Greenwich House Settlement Music School orchestra. "It was just something I did," she said in a 1985 Inquirer article. "I couldn't ride the bicycle very well, but I could play the piano.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2006 | By Hector C. Williams Jr. FOR THE INQUIRER
One of Philadelphia's most celebrated and longest-running parties is back. "Back to Basics" was one of the hippest underground parties this city has ever encountered. Known for its eclectic mix of hip-hop grooves, soulful house classics, acid jazz, and funky abstract beats and breaks, "Back to Basics" offered club dancers a buffet of delightful flavors. The long-awaited 15-year reunion will be at 8 p.m. Wednesday at World Cafe Live. The party started at Silk City in 1991 and built a big, devoted following before ending in the late '90s.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 7, 2015
I'm Glad I Did By Cynthia Weil Soho. 272 pp. $18.99 Reviewed by Katie Haegele Only real music nerds can tell you the names of the writers behind hit songs, but there are some everybody knows. Take "Don't Know Much," which should be playing in your head, in Aaron Neville's voice, right about now. Or "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling," which is, incredibly, the most-played song of the 20th century. Both of these, plus hundreds of others, were written by a woman named Cynthia Weil.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Introduced as interior designer for the 152-room SLS LUX Philadelphia Hotel, the iconic Phillipe Starck found it easy to strike the right chord with his audience of city movers and shakers. Turning to Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff, the Frenchman thanked the recording impresarios for giving him "the kind of music that has allowed me to make good projects. " "This is my opportunity," Starck said of his first Philadelphia project, "to be able to pay my debt to you and your music," to which he listens as he designs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
The songs that fl├╝gelhornist Hugh Masekela and singer-guitarist Vusi Mahlasela performed at the Annenberg Center on Saturday night were the sound track to the apartheid era, and thus dealt with grim themes: racial segregation, violence, imprisonment, and struggle. But the mood these two South African icons conjured was buoyant and celebratory, a vivid illustration of the role music played in lifting the spirits of South Africans during decades of oppression. The lighthearted mood could be summed up in Mahlasela's gallows humor, as he introduced a "very short song" called "Jailbreak," written by a friend during his prison term - then proceeded to scrape the strings of his guitar to simulate a sawing sound.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Writer Ted Swindley built his 1988 musical Always . . . Patsy Cline on the flimsiest foundation I've seen in a jukebox musical. Given the genre, that's saying a lot. Given that this production has sold the most advance ticket sales of any show in Bristol Riverside Theatre's history, I'm not sure it matters to any fan of Cline's music. Swindley based his two-act show on a true story, but even to call it a story is charitable. "Anecdote," maybe, or "single scene in a Cline biopic," or "footnote in music history that would interest no one . . . " The evening starts with Louise Seger (Jo Twiss)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Motown the Musical packs its score with some of the greatest hitmakers in music history: the Jackson 5, Diana Ross and the Supremes, Stevie Wonder, Gladys Knight and the Pips, the Temptations, and the Commodores. As a story, though, it's missing only a cross for Motown records founder Berry Gordy to hang on. Gordy based the musical on his 1994 autobiography, To Be Loved: The Music, The Magic, The Memories of Motown . There's plenty of music and magic in the production now on tour at the Academy of Music; in addition to the bands or artists listed above, all the Motown records stars from the 1960s to 1980s get their 15 seconds of stage time in this 21/2-hour show (some, such as Teena Marie and Rick James, merely bookend a short-shrift collection of Motown's late-period hits)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Anyone looking for a quick overview of jazz history could take a crash course simply by checking out a few performances in Philly this weekend. Around the city, modern jazz artists are paying homage to a groundbreaking festival and some of the music's most pioneering artists, glancing back while moving determinedly forward. Saturday night at the Painted Bride Art Center, Philadelphia saxophonist and bandleader Bobby Zankel kicks off his three-night "Still the New Thing" festival with a concert celebrating his mentor, Cecil Taylor.
NEWS
January 21, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
CLEVELAND - Greg Harris has been in his new job only since Jan. 1, so forgive him if his office is still a work in progress. Chuck Berry's "Carol" - a 45 he bought as a teenager, growing up in Bucks County - is pinned to a bulletin board, next to a picture of the late Phillies relief pitcher Tug McGraw. An image of Joe Strummer of the Clash in silhouette lies flat on his desk. Leaning against the wall is a poster for Rock Around the Clock , the 1956 movie staring Bill Haley & the Comets that promises to tell "The Whole Story of Rock and Roll!"
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Recording sessions have the mystique of making music history behind closed doors. No matter that the single most famous one in pop culture - the December day in 1956 when Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Carl Perkins, now known as the Million Dollar Quartet, were all in the same Memphis studio - yielded nothing of great musical consequence. It was lions at play, singing gospel and blues that the public didn't want to hear from them. But who wouldn't have wanted to be a fly on that wall?
FOOD
December 12, 2012 | By Emily Babay, Philly.com Staff Writer
Diners at the renovated Hard Rock Cafe in Center City can now get more of a taste of Philadelphia music history with their meals. In the new Philadelphia Room, patrons might sit beneath a shredded leather outfit worn by Philadelphia native Lisa "Left Eye" Lopes, the late TLC singer-songwriter, or handwritten lyrics to "I Hate Myself for Loving You" by Joan Jett, who grew up in Wynnewood. Plaques describe each item and the artist's connection to the Philadelphia area. "Philadelphia is such a rock-and-roll town," Hard Rock historian Jeff Nolan said during a morning tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2011 | By CHRIS CAROLA, Associated Press
LAKE GEORGE, N.Y. - Robert Flacke Sr. can remember the days when Fort William Henry's multimedia exhibit consisted of two Kodak carousel-style color slide projectors that kept breaking down. The history-heavy tourist attraction on the southern end of Lake George upgraded years ago to a video display, an improvement that looks positively futuristic amid all the aging, dusty exhibits sprinkled throughout the privately owned reconstructed French and Indian War fort and museum. Many of the displays look like they haven't changed since the place was built more than a half-century ago. To boost numbers of visitors, museum and historical sites around the country are searching for new ways to update old exhibits amid a time of economic uncertainty and declining support for museums in general and history museums in particular.
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