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Music Industry

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1990 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Look out, Jesse Helms. Take heed, Tipper Gore. Heavy guns in the music industry, the visual and performance arts are now going on the offensive to ward off what they perceive as dangerous infringements on their constitutional, First Amendment and free speech rights. The battle cry was raised this week at the New Music Seminar in New York City, which featured 8,000 young turk rock and rap artists, music industry executives, broadcasters and journalists. Retaliatory measures to censorship also were being plotted at a recent gathering of more than 200 top music industry executives and artists in Los Angeles, convened by Virgin Records executive Jeff Ayeroff.
NEWS
October 16, 2003 | By Kevin Cardin
Now here's a fascinating paradox: The record industry lecturing its audience on immorality - the theft of copyrighted music over the Internet. This from an industry that has enriched itself by glorifying infidelity, violence and rebellion, as well as criminal, abusive and other deviant behavior. Meanwhile, you have albums such as 50 Cent's Get Rich, or Die Tryin' (Interscope, a unit of Universal Music Group) and Radiohead's Hail To The Thief (Capitol Records, owned by EMI Group)
NEWS
February 9, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Andrei Fritz was itching to let loose a torrent of drumming that could be heard in the classroom upstairs and by passersby in the hallway outside. But there was a problem. "Uhh, there's no power," said Fritz, 21, crouched down and looking at a thick black cable. Oops. "On any of them?" asked Jeffrey Hiatt, a head engineer and staff producer at Turtle Studios in Philadelphia. Something wasn't working right, but Hiatt was unfazed. What better dose of reality for a group of Rowan University students learning about the music industry?
BUSINESS
September 9, 2003 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The recording industry sued 261 music fans in U.S. federal courts yesterday, accusing each of illegally downloading and sharing at least 1,000 songs over the Internet. The civil lawsuits could eventually number in the thousands, said the Recording Industry Association of America, whose members include major record labels BMG, EMI, Sony Music, Universal Music Group and Warner Music. This summer, the RIAA issued about 1,600 subpoenas to universities and Internet service providers, demanding that they identify those allegedly sharing copyrighted music.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2008 | By Frank Visco INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the Internet and sites like MySpace revolutionizing the business, young people with music talent are on the edge of unprecedented opportunities to break into the industry, local music executives say. "You guys are spoiled and you don't even know it," said "Grouchy" Greg Watkins, cofounder of allhiphop.com. "The music industry is at ground zero. There's an opportunity to break in like never before. " To make things even easier for young students interested in careers in the music industry, the Jr Music Executive organization started a speakers series in association with the Friends Neighborhood Guild.
LIVING
June 30, 1999 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Behold the music industry's most coveted consumer: A girl in pigtails and tie-dye, maybe 11 years old, radiating fruity cologne from the Johnson's Kid Wash while, in her ice-cream sticky hands, she clutches a 98 Degrees T-shirt Mom just bought for $22. Like the two friends who have accompanied her to Montage Mountain, she's an enthusiastic cog in the "boy band" machine - she knows the names of all four members of 98 Degrees - and is on the lookout...
NEWS
March 20, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The music industry may not know where the demand is going to come from. But there's never going to be any shortage of supply. That much was obvious at the South by Southwest Music Festival, or SXSW, which ended Sunday, where more than 1,500 acts played showcases, and hundreds of others plugged in at barbecue joints and taco stands in this city that becomes the capital of the music business every March. Band managers, booking agents and label honchos played I'll-show-you-mine-if-you-show-me-yours with digital mobile devices, as panels met on such topics as "Record Companies: Who Needs Them?"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1999 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Scenes from yet another global mega-merger: Seagram's, the Canadian beverage and entertainment conglomerate, buys the multimedia company Polygram for an estimated $10.4 billion in December, linking one massive music industry operation (the purchaser's MCA, Interscope, Universal and Geffen) to another (the purchased's Mercury, Island, Motown, A&M and Def Jam) to form the Universal Music Group. Thousands of executives and support staff lose their jobs. Managers attend "integration" meetings.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1990 | By William R. Macklin, Special to The Inquirer
Singer Jody Watley, winner of the 1987 Grammy as best new artist, was clearly outraged. Imagine: A pair of handsome, swivel-hipped performers named Robert Pilatus and Fabrice Morvan had managed to win the same award in 1989 even though the two, better known as Milli Vanilli, never sang a note of Girl You Know It's True, the smash album that bears their names and likenesses. Watley, appearing on Arsenio Hall's show on Tuesday - the day after Pilatus and Morvan became the only personalities ever to be stripped of a Grammy - roundly chastised the dreadlocked duo for their charade.
NEWS
April 25, 2006 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Put away the acne cream and break out the champagne. This is the year American Idol came of age. Even though Fox's singing contest has been camped atop the Nielsen heap for three years, in the past Idol has always been considered a cheesy, teenybopper fad. But as its audience has continued to expand (up again this season 14 percent), the ultimate karaoke party has become a legitimate monster. "A confluence of cultural factors have made this show not just a hit but a supernova in the TV universe," says John Rash, media buyer for Campbell Mithun, a Minneapolis advertising agency.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 16, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
A revised bill to require dance venues that stream music to apply for special licenses was reintroduced in City Council on Thursday, after its first iteration sparked a chorus of complaints from the music industry. Councilman Mark Squilla's bill would close a loophole in the current law that allows nightclubs that stream music to avoid getting a special assembly license, which is required of places where DJs and live performers play. The first draft of the bill would also have required venues to keep a registry of names, phone numbers, and addresses of all musical acts that could be turned over to police.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
AUSTIN, TEXAS - Battered, bruised, and still shirtless, Iggy Pop is 68 years old. And in its 30th year, the South by Southwest music festival is getting long in the tooth itself. But the sprawling industry conference that took over the Lone Star State capitol last week - on the heels of its Interactive tech conference that brought President Obama to town, and coinciding with the SXSW film festival - and that is making a show of rededicating itself to "music discovery" after growing swollen with too many Kanye- and Gaga-size names in recent years, has in fact always embraced leather-faced legends.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
AUSTIN, TEXAS - Repping Philadelphia in a red throwback Julius Erving Sixers T-shirt, Chill Moody held the crowd rapt Tuesday night at the Main, a capacious club on the Sixth Street strip in Austin, Texas, on the opening night of the South by Southwest music festival. "I want you to raise one hand in the air," the West Philadelphia rapper instructed the pretty much packed house just after rocking the room with "Concrete Jungle," his gritty 2015 single, featuring Mack Wilds, at the Amplify Philly party sponsored by music incubator RecPhilly and tech industry instigator StartupPHL.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2016 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Jay, 18, is passionate about music and dreams of one day having a career in the music industry. He taught himself to play the guitar and is very good at it. Jay was thrilled to have the opportunity to visit a music school, where he learned some new riffs. He played with one of the teachers and performed one of his own songs. His lyrics about what it is like to live in the foster care system and his desire to have a permanent family moved some of his listeners to tears. Jay hopes to inspire other youths with his music.
NEWS
February 9, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Andrei Fritz was itching to let loose a torrent of drumming that could be heard in the classroom upstairs and by passersby in the hallway outside. But there was a problem. "Uhh, there's no power," said Fritz, 21, crouched down and looking at a thick black cable. Oops. "On any of them?" asked Jeffrey Hiatt, a head engineer and staff producer at Turtle Studios in Philadelphia. Something wasn't working right, but Hiatt was unfazed. What better dose of reality for a group of Rowan University students learning about the music industry?
NEWS
January 15, 2016 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Staff Writer
When Fox's hit show Empire premiered in January 2015, Philly actor Clayton Prince said his friends called to congratulate him on selling his show, about a troubled Philadelphia family in the recording industry. "There were some people who thought I sold it and I didn't take them along with me," Prince, 50, said. "I was like, 'There was nothing to take along. I was taken! I did not sell it.' " On Friday, Prince - whose legal name is Clayton Prince Tanksley - filed a lawsuit in federal court alleging that producer Lee Daniels stole the concept for Empire from Prince after he pitched his show to Daniels at the Greater Philadelphia Film Office's "Philly Pitch" in April 2008.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
On the first, wet Tuesday of December, Philly's Jesse Hale Moore - a keyboardist-singer known from bands such as Nightlands - showed his solo side at Boot & Saddle, with new songs and blue-eyed soul. It was the opener for the Weathervane Music Residency at Boot & Saddle. With the help of Philly's Weathervane - a nonprofit that supports independent music and its communities - every Tuesday this month, a different local act presents its wares to show which way the wind blows. Moore, Teen Men (Dec.
NEWS
June 4, 2015
ISSUE | EARLY LEARNING Investments pay off sooner, and later I was happy to see Gov. Wolf and law enforcement officials make the anticrime case for quality, early-childhood education ("Wolf: Invest in preschool, not prison," May 27). Members of the business community see another critical benefit: strengthening our economy and workforce. Research highlighted by the national business-leader group ReadyNation shows that investing in these programs yields up to $26,000 in net long-term economic benefits for every child served.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THESE DAYS, Hollywood doesn't want to make a big, gooey romance about you unless you're a vampire or live within an hour's drive of Nicholas Sparks. Have we forgotten "The Bodyguard," that corny glam romance about a famous-but-vulnerable pop star and the strong, silent man who protects her? One who has not is Gina Prince-Bythewood, who (14 years ago!) made "Love and Basketball," and now returns with "Beyond the Lights," a bodyguard-ish love story about suicidal singer Noni (Gugu Mbatha-Raw)
NEWS
August 9, 2014 | By Lydia O'Neal, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it comes to rejuvenating the economy, sectors like housing, manufacturing, and small business tend to steal the most attention. Councilman David Oh, however, has his eyes on music. At a Thursday news conference in City Hall, the councilman unveiled PHL Live, a four-month contest to bring prominence - and prizes - to deserving Philadelphia musicians. A sort of Philadelphia's Got Talent. "We want to recognize music as not just a hobby, but a job that needs to be paid," Oh said.
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