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Music Industry

NEWS
July 23, 1999 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
He came on 15 years ago like the heir apparent, with an international hit album called "Valotte" that evoked strong and favorable comparisons to his late father's most personal and revealing material. Yet follow-up sets failed to match the initial potential, and Julian Lennon eventually gave up the ghosts of the music industry and the father he hardly knew, disappearing from the public eye for seven years. Now he's back with the goods again - a warm and intimate set of Beatles-minded (but personal- demon-exposing)
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | By Dave Urbanski, Special to The Inquirer
For Pitman musician Jim Cheadle, 36, making artistic statements was never rewarded with a lucrative record contract, a popular music video or a No. 1 song. But now, only three months after taking a few hours to write a pop tune in his basement, Cheadle and 22 children are setting the music industry on its ear and hitting the big time with their song, "In a Desert Land. " Cheadle had spent most of his life making music or writing songs for other musicians when he sat down in his basement in late February, shortly after the Persian Gulf war had ended, and began to put his emotions to music.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1986 | By MARY FLANNERY, Daily News Staff Writer
The Philadelphia music industry launched an ambitious project yesterday designed to focus national and local attention on the city as, in Mayor Goode's words, "the music Mecca of the world," and to pump new energy and dollars into the music business here. "In the early '60's, Philadelphia was one of the biggest music centers," said Larry Magid of Electric Factory concerts. "Now, it's strong, but no one knows about it. What we want to do is encourage growth and create more jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1986 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
"Philly's Beat," a musical revue written and directed by Stephen Stahl. Musical direction and arrangements by William Jolly, choreography by Robin Reseen, lighting and set design by Daniel C. Abrahamsen, costumes by Patricia Hibbert, audio by William Vannice. Presented by Broadway Bound, Inc., and Albert Reyes at Plays & Players Theatre, 1714 Delancey St., through Aug. 24. For all intents and purposes I stopped listening to new popular music in the middle 1950s. Almost without exception the raw pop material being introduced via records and the airwaves at that time was inane, silly beyond belief, infuriatingly simplistic and marketed with unerring aim at adolescents, pre-adolescents and perpetual adolescents of unformed tastes and inchoate discrimination.
NEWS
March 1, 2000 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Barry Abrams, 64, a music-promotion man who helped take numerous careers to the top of the charts, died Monday at Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia. A Cherry Hill resident since the early 1970s, he was born and raised in Philadelphia. Mr. Abrams became known as one of the nation's leading recording-artist promotion men by getting records, often for new young artists, airtime in Philadelphia, one of the nation's most respected music markets. He worked in the industry from 1957 to 1981.
NEWS
February 1, 1998 | By Aileen Soper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
While record sales in most musical styles have turned relatively flat in recent years, consumer interest in Christian contemporary music has exploded, according to an industry trade group. The Christian music industry has changed in the last five years, as major recording labels have taken notice of the music's commercial potential, musicians and industry experts say. Smaller Christian-oriented labels have been acquired by major ones, giving Christian acts wider access to major sales, marketing and promotional outlets.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1990 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
"This is the best day I've had since my bar mitzvah," cracked progressive folky Jay Ansill. Jazz vocalist Evelyn Simms whooped and hollered, then whispered to a friend, "I'm glad I came. " The two were among the winners at the Third Philadelphia Music Awards, the almost-annual pat on the back to local musicians from their industry colleagues and fans. Still begging for a nickname like The Phillys, the $300-a-pop plexiglass awards, which look like little Washington Monuments, were handed out at midday ceremonies yesterday at the Academy of Music Rehearsal Hall.
NEWS
February 10, 2005 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Grammy winner and developer Kenny Gamble said yesterday he had finalized an agreement to bring the Rhythm & Blues Foundation from New York to Philadelphia - the first step in his quest to make this city a destination for fans of a musical style he helped to pioneer three decades ago. Gamble, 61, who created the "Sound of Philadelphia" and recently is known for redeveloping his old neighborhood in South Philadelphia, said he expected the foundation...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Mesfin Fekadu, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Fleetwood Mac is heading back on the road, and that means the top-selling group will release new music, sort of. On its 34-city North American tour, which begins April 4 in Columbus, Ohio, and plays the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia on April 6, the band will perform two new songs, and that could mean a new album will follow. Or not. Stevie Nicks recently sang on tracks that Lindsey Buckingham, Mick Fleetwood, and John McVie worked on, calling the sessions "great. " But Nicks also said she was not sure where the band fits in today's music industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2013 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
When it works well, the music business can be Darwinian: The best music will find its audience, somehow. Parquet Courts' Light Up Gold is a case in point. Released last summer on the band's own label, the album followed the Brooklyn band's noisy, lo-fi debut, which was first released only on cassette and generated little notice. But Light Up Gold , recorded in three days in the band's rehearsal space, is a bold, bracing blast of punk rock, full of sharp, rousing riffs behind wordy, witty rants, and it found enough acclaim for a larger indie label, What's My Rupture?
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