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Music Industry

NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Friendly and outgoing, Harmonie delights in laughing at a good joke. What the 9-year-old likes most about herself are her dimples, her height (she's tall), and that she knows how to dance. Harmonie is also good at singing and has not ruled out a career in the music industry. Her favorite subjects in school are computer technology and music. She does well academically and has many friends in school and in her neighborhood. Harmonie dreams of being a billionaire some day. On the way to that goal, however, she plans to finish high school, attend college, and then become a teacher.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2016 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Jay, 18, is passionate about music and dreams of one day having a career in the music industry. He taught himself to play the guitar and is very good at it. Jay was thrilled to have the opportunity to visit a music school, where he learned some new riffs. He played with one of the teachers and performed one of his own songs. His lyrics about what it is like to live in the foster care system and his desire to have a permanent family moved some of his listeners to tears. Jay hopes to inspire other youths with his music.
NEWS
February 12, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
It's possible that Adele won't be the runaway winner at the 2012 Grammy Awards, to be broadcast at 8 p.m. Sunday on CBS3 from the Staples Center in Los Angeles. With the Grammys, after all, the inexplicable often occurs. Last year, Canadian indie band Arcade Fire upset heavily favored Eminem for best album, the same category in which Herbie Hancock's The River (The Joni Letters) caused a tizzy by beating out both Amy Winehouse and Kanye West in 2008. But in 2012, it would stand to reason that nothing can stand in the way of Adele.
NEWS
March 26, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
DICK McGettigan was a fun-loving Irishman who never hesitated to get out on the dance floor when the music was playing or to belt out a ballad in his robust voice. He was an avid music fan, favoring jazz, big bands and swing, and tried not to miss a parade of military pomp. His favorite vocalist was Ella Fitzgerald. Richard J. McGettigan, a nearly 35-year investigator with the Department of Defense Personnel Support Center, helping to stop contract fraud and bribery, a man with a nonstop Irish wit who especially loved to entertain children, died March 21 of congestive heart failure.
NEWS
April 16, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
A revised bill to require dance venues that stream music to apply for special licenses was reintroduced in City Council on Thursday, after its first iteration sparked a chorus of complaints from the music industry. Councilman Mark Squilla's bill would close a loophole in the current law that allows nightclubs that stream music to avoid getting a special assembly license, which is required of places where DJs and live performers play. The first draft of the bill would also have required venues to keep a registry of names, phone numbers, and addresses of all musical acts that could be turned over to police.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2001 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
These are tough times for the music business. After a banner 2000, sales of recorded music are down for the first time in years. A souring economy caused fans to think carefully before plunking down $125 to see Janet Jackson, and tour interruptions following Sept. 11 dealt the live-music industry another setback. To make matters worse, as record labels struggled unsuccessfully to combat online file-sharing of individual songs, sales of blank discs soared, thanks to the growing popularity of home-computer CD "burners" able to copy entire albums.
NEWS
July 23, 1999 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
He came on 15 years ago like the heir apparent, with an international hit album called "Valotte" that evoked strong and favorable comparisons to his late father's most personal and revealing material. Yet follow-up sets failed to match the initial potential, and Julian Lennon eventually gave up the ghosts of the music industry and the father he hardly knew, disappearing from the public eye for seven years. Now he's back with the goods again - a warm and intimate set of Beatles-minded (but personal- demon-exposing)
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | By Dave Urbanski, Special to The Inquirer
For Pitman musician Jim Cheadle, 36, making artistic statements was never rewarded with a lucrative record contract, a popular music video or a No. 1 song. But now, only three months after taking a few hours to write a pop tune in his basement, Cheadle and 22 children are setting the music industry on its ear and hitting the big time with their song, "In a Desert Land. " Cheadle had spent most of his life making music or writing songs for other musicians when he sat down in his basement in late February, shortly after the Persian Gulf war had ended, and began to put his emotions to music.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1986 | By MARY FLANNERY, Daily News Staff Writer
The Philadelphia music industry launched an ambitious project yesterday designed to focus national and local attention on the city as, in Mayor Goode's words, "the music Mecca of the world," and to pump new energy and dollars into the music business here. "In the early '60's, Philadelphia was one of the biggest music centers," said Larry Magid of Electric Factory concerts. "Now, it's strong, but no one knows about it. What we want to do is encourage growth and create more jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1986 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
"Philly's Beat," a musical revue written and directed by Stephen Stahl. Musical direction and arrangements by William Jolly, choreography by Robin Reseen, lighting and set design by Daniel C. Abrahamsen, costumes by Patricia Hibbert, audio by William Vannice. Presented by Broadway Bound, Inc., and Albert Reyes at Plays & Players Theatre, 1714 Delancey St., through Aug. 24. For all intents and purposes I stopped listening to new popular music in the middle 1950s. Almost without exception the raw pop material being introduced via records and the airwaves at that time was inane, silly beyond belief, infuriatingly simplistic and marketed with unerring aim at adolescents, pre-adolescents and perpetual adolescents of unformed tastes and inchoate discrimination.
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