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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
THE GRAMMYS are that annual lovefest when the music industry tries to convince the rest of the world that it still has a pulse. But you know what showed a surprising heartbeat yesterday? The movie industry. For the first time since Christmas 2008, four - count 'em, four - movies opened with more than a $20 million box-office haul. "The Vow" led the way with a ridiculous $41.7 million. Who knew so many people would remember to see a movie about amnesia? In second, with $39.3 million, according to yesterday's studio estimates, was the Denzel Washington-Ryan Reynolds ' action thriller "Safe House.
NEWS
February 13, 2012 | BY Jonathan Takiff, Philadelphia Daily News
WE MAY never know if Whitney Houston died by accident or intent - drowning in a bathtub Saturday afternoon at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. While there's much speculation that she was under the influence of anti-depressants and alcohol, the coroner's official report won't be out for weeks. What we do know is that Whitney Houston couldn't possibly have picked a more opportune moment to make goodbyes and deliver a brutal statement about the dark side of the music biz - how the stresses of the game can drive a person to bad habits and spiraling self-destruction.
NEWS
February 12, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
It's possible that Adele won't be the runaway winner at the 2012 Grammy Awards, to be broadcast at 8 p.m. Sunday on CBS3 from the Staples Center in Los Angeles. With the Grammys, after all, the inexplicable often occurs. Last year, Canadian indie band Arcade Fire upset heavily favored Eminem for best album, the same category in which Herbie Hancock's The River (The Joni Letters) caused a tizzy by beating out both Amy Winehouse and Kanye West in 2008. But in 2012, it would stand to reason that nothing can stand in the way of Adele.
NEWS
January 2, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a tumultuous 2011 in which they opened a new Center City coffee-and-music venue amid a nasty labor dispute, no one would have faulted rising entertainment entrepreneurs Jamie Lokoff and Tommy Joyner for taking it easy in the new year. But that's not how they roll at MilkBoy, a blend of java- and music-brewed business ventures that seeks to reinvent itself in 2012. Joyner and Lokoff are focusing on Center City after a decade running a recording studio and their now well-known coffee house in Ardmore (and a smaller one in Bryn Mawr)
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
You could call Serena Sol Brown - singer, musician, and radio personality - a triple threat, as her friends like to say. But that would be leaving out a lot. Let's see. She also writes songs. And produces and promotes artists. And did I mention deejaying and acting? What are we up to now? Octuple threat? Suffice it to say that Serena Sol's artistic journey has taken her in and out of so many facets of the music industry that that she probably could run a label herself.
NEWS
October 16, 2011
Pop Biophilia (One Little Indian ***1/2) In these days of the rapidly reshaping music industry, artists as often generate buzz with their choice of delivery system, or what bells and whistles they attach to the music, as with the music itself. That's true and then some of Björk's Biophilia , the Icelandic iconoclast's eighth album, which she is releasing not only as a CD, digital download, and LP, but also as a series of apps that can be fooled with on an iPad or iPhone.
NEWS
April 27, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NEW YORK - A Jewish housewife from Passaic, N.J., named Florence Greenberg was a pioneer in the '50s - first, she outsmarted the male-dominated pop record industry with her own Scepter record label. And second, the already-married Greenberg fell in love with her talented black music producer, Luther Dixon ("Sixteen Candles," "Tonight's the Night"). But for all her home-grown savvy at the pinnacle of the music industry and her strength to stand up for herself in bucking a taboo, Greenberg would have been nothing without four black girls from a Passaic high school.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2011 | staff
Anyone deep into the local music scene ought to perk up and listen to the tunes drummer David Uosikkinen and friends are rerecording for "In the Pocket: Essential Songs of Philadelphia. " Available (along with a cool documentary) at http: POP . . . plus Anyone deep into the local music scene ought to perk up and listen to the tunes drummer David Uosikkinen and friends are rerecording for "In the Pocket: Essential Songs of Philadelphia. " Available (along with a cool documentary)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Back in 2002, when Brian McTear was producing an album for chamber-pop songwriter Matt Pond at his Miner Street Recordings studio, the two friends batted around ideas about the future of the music industry. CD sales had peaked the preceding year. And though Napster had ushered in the file-sharing revolution, the recording industry was not yet in free fall. "It was obvious even back then that the music industry was on an unsustainable path," says McTear, executive director of Weathervane Music, the Fishtown nonprofit that assists young artists in a response to the music business' transformation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2010 | By CHUCK DARROW, darrowc@phillynews.com 215-313-3134
THE TINY BOROUGH of Sellersville in northwestern Bucks County is hardly the heart of show business. It's probably not even the spleen. But that hasn't stopped it from being the home of what is arguably the Delaware Valley's busiest and most diverse concert venue, the Sellersville Theater 1894. Named for the stable that was built in 1894 on the site at 24 W. Temple Ave. (just off Main Street), ST94, as it's known, is something of a music-industry anomaly. Though small (340 seats)
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