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NEWS
January 2, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a tumultuous 2011 in which they opened a new Center City coffee-and-music venue amid a nasty labor dispute, no one would have faulted rising entertainment entrepreneurs Jamie Lokoff and Tommy Joyner for taking it easy in the new year. But that's not how they roll at MilkBoy, a blend of java- and music-brewed business ventures that seeks to reinvent itself in 2012. Joyner and Lokoff are focusing on Center City after a decade running a recording studio and their now well-known coffee house in Ardmore (and a smaller one in Bryn Mawr)
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
You could call Serena Sol Brown - singer, musician, and radio personality - a triple threat, as her friends like to say. But that would be leaving out a lot. Let's see. She also writes songs. And produces and promotes artists. And did I mention deejaying and acting? What are we up to now? Octuple threat? Suffice it to say that Serena Sol's artistic journey has taken her in and out of so many facets of the music industry that that she probably could run a label herself.
NEWS
October 16, 2011
Pop Biophilia (One Little Indian ***1/2) In these days of the rapidly reshaping music industry, artists as often generate buzz with their choice of delivery system, or what bells and whistles they attach to the music, as with the music itself. That's true and then some of Björk's Biophilia , the Icelandic iconoclast's eighth album, which she is releasing not only as a CD, digital download, and LP, but also as a series of apps that can be fooled with on an iPad or iPhone.
NEWS
April 27, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NEW YORK - A Jewish housewife from Passaic, N.J., named Florence Greenberg was a pioneer in the '50s - first, she outsmarted the male-dominated pop record industry with her own Scepter record label. And second, the already-married Greenberg fell in love with her talented black music producer, Luther Dixon ("Sixteen Candles," "Tonight's the Night"). But for all her home-grown savvy at the pinnacle of the music industry and her strength to stand up for herself in bucking a taboo, Greenberg would have been nothing without four black girls from a Passaic high school.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2011 | staff
Anyone deep into the local music scene ought to perk up and listen to the tunes drummer David Uosikkinen and friends are rerecording for "In the Pocket: Essential Songs of Philadelphia. " Available (along with a cool documentary) at http: POP . . . plus Anyone deep into the local music scene ought to perk up and listen to the tunes drummer David Uosikkinen and friends are rerecording for "In the Pocket: Essential Songs of Philadelphia. " Available (along with a cool documentary)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Back in 2002, when Brian McTear was producing an album for chamber-pop songwriter Matt Pond at his Miner Street Recordings studio, the two friends batted around ideas about the future of the music industry. CD sales had peaked the preceding year. And though Napster had ushered in the file-sharing revolution, the recording industry was not yet in free fall. "It was obvious even back then that the music industry was on an unsustainable path," says McTear, executive director of Weathervane Music, the Fishtown nonprofit that assists young artists in a response to the music business' transformation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2010 | By CHUCK DARROW, darrowc@phillynews.com 215-313-3134
THE TINY BOROUGH of Sellersville in northwestern Bucks County is hardly the heart of show business. It's probably not even the spleen. But that hasn't stopped it from being the home of what is arguably the Delaware Valley's busiest and most diverse concert venue, the Sellersville Theater 1894. Named for the stable that was built in 1894 on the site at 24 W. Temple Ave. (just off Main Street), ST94, as it's known, is something of a music-industry anomaly. Though small (340 seats)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
How to put this politely? Though frequently riotous, Get Him to the Greek , the Forgetting Sarah Marshall spin-off with Russell Brand and Jonah Hill reprising their characters as shaggy British rocker Aldous Snow and his fawning fan, is Hamburger Helper with more helper than hamburger. This time, the supporting players are the stars. Yet even while these secondary figures don't fully rise to leading-man dimensions, the film succeeds as a music-industry satire, a very naughty version of Almost Famous . This time, the fanboy does not write the legend of the rocker but restores him to former glory.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2010 | By Emily Tartanella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You might not recognize the name Joseph Arthur, but if you turn on the television, there's a good chance you'll come across at least one of his songs. In Philadelphia for a five-week residency at the Tin Angel, Arthur is one of rock's most prolific misfits, with seven albums and nearly a dozen EPs to his name. Arthur, an Akron, Ohio, native who lives in New York, has earned a reputation as a powerful singer-songwriter with both a lyrical gift and a commercial edge. Sitting down to talk before his solo show Saturday night, he reluctantly removed the oversize sunglasses from his face.
NEWS
February 20, 2010 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
American music fans don't yet know who V V Brown is, so only a couple of dozen of the curious came out on Thursday to MarBar, the inviting new venue shaped like a long sliver of pie that looks out on the corner of 40th and Walnut Streets from above the Bridge movie theater complex. There will be more on hand the next time Brown comes through, that's for certain. The British pop-rock singer, born Vanessa Brown to parents of Jamaican and Puerto Rican descent (to whom she dedicated a slowed-down reggae coda to the upbeat "Crying Blood")
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