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Music Lessons

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1990 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
The luckiest students have great teachers. As a teenager, Happy Traum, who already had learned to play the tunes on a 10-inch Folkways album called Brownie McGhee Blues, took his guitar up to the bluesman's Harlem apartment. Early on, Traum struggled to keep up with McGhee's style of finger-picked guitar - McGhee would pause to show Traum a lick, and then keep on picking. Eventually, learning by example as well as experience, the student came to keep pace with the teacher. Stefan Grossman was also a teenage guitarist traveling uptown.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Inga Sandvoss, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Devastating, said the music department chairman. Appalling, said a concerned parent. No way, said a music student. The Owen J. Roberts school board listened closely Monday evening as a standing-room-only crowd raised objections to the district's plan to eliminate instrumental music lessons at the elementary level. Fred Davies, district music department chairman, said the cut - a money- saving measure - would affect about 220 elementary students. "The loss of the program would have devastating effects," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1989 | By Bruce Britt, Los Angeles Daily News
Leave it to the cutting-edge mentality of popular music to put a new twist on the venerable occupation of teaching. With thousands of aspiring Eddie Van Halens and Herbie Hancocks all wanting to learn to play instruments, why would anyone want to take lessons from some also-ran in a cramped classroom? After all, these would-be virtuosos can get one-on-one instruction from some of the greats in the music field. What's more, instruction comes in a medium that feels comfortable to musicians raised on television.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Paul Stouffer's first experience with music was as a little boy in the town of Chambersburg, in central Pennsylvania, where his father conducted the town band. One night at a band rehearsal, having fallen asleep in his favorite spot by the drums, Stouffer was awakened by a thundering crash. He cried so hard his father had to take a break to comfort him. There were other trying musical moments, Stouffer, 80, said this week as he recalled the events that formed the foundation of what is now a post-retirement career as a composer.
NEWS
November 5, 1989 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's 7 a.m. Addison West puts on his sweat pants and squash-championship T- shirt and marches down three flights of stairs to breakfast, a bowl of Crispix and two pieces of cinnamon toast. Then he piles into his mother's station wagon and races off to choir practice. Ten-year-old Addison isn't exactly Pavarotti; even his mother, Vinny, concedes that. But, hey, it's what he likes to do. It's part of his schedule. An hour later, at 9 a.m., he starts classes at the nearby Gladwyne Elementary School.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Pitman knows Madeline Brewer as a golden girl with a silvery soprano. The cozy, conservative, church-steepled Gloucester County community has applauded her in upbeat local productions like Bye Bye Birdie and cheered her victory in the Miss Pitman pageant of 2010. Some folks even drove up to Connecticut last summer to see Brewer sing the title role in Liberty , a musical about the statue that inspired the world. But little "Maddie" Brewer as a jailbird with a girlfriend, a neck tattoo, and a heroin habit?
NEWS
June 8, 2008 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
BEIJING - A cacophony of piano music spills from the 14 lesson rooms at the Piano City music store as a big digital clock in a waiting area counts down the time on lessons. On this Sunday, more than 100 students will file in and out for music lessons, including 11-year-old Jesse Cheng. Her parents say families in China are keen to train their children in music, especially piano or violin, to give them an edge in life. "This may be helpful in the future," said Frank Cheng, who owns an information-technology company.
NEWS
May 18, 2000 | By Erin Carroll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In Kingston, Jamaica, there is a classical-music disc jockey so enamored of a young pianist from Bryn Mawr that he often features her music on his show. Brynne Reece, 16, is mildly embarrassed about getting the airtime. After all, the disc jockey is her uncle. But he's an uncle with an ear for talent. Reece recently has earned wider recognition in the classical-music world. In March, she won her first major piano competition, conducted by the Russian American Music Association in Boston.
NEWS
July 16, 2007
AS A TAXPAYER, I understand I have to pay for public schools. What I don't understand is why I have to pay for music lessons, lunch programs, sport teams and any other activities that do not come under school work. If you want your child to have all these extra things, why don't you pay for them? I do. My kids all had piano lessons - I paid. My son plays football, $300 for shirt, pants, etc., $50 fee just to play. Any other sport, $50 to $100 to play. To be in the band, extra. I send my kids to Catholic school.
NEWS
October 1, 1988 | By Rebecca Barnard, Special to The Inquirer
Joseph W. Conway, 85, a Moorestown native known for his music and his azaleas, died Wednesday at Memorial Hospital of Burlington County, Mount Holly. Mr. Conway, a vibraharp player known to local residents as "Mr. Music Man," was the founder of the Joseph Conway Orchestra. When the band was not playing at a wedding, a prom or a country-club dance, Mr. Conway was giving music lessons or tending the azaleas in his yard. His property was included several times on the Moorestown House and Garden tour.
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NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Al C. Rinaldi, 77, who rose from poverty to head Jacobs Music, a leading piano retailer with locations around the region, died of gastrointestinal cancer Thursday, Oct. 30, at his home in Mount Laurel. Born Aug. 27, 1937, in Scranton, Mr. Rinaldi grew up believing his name was Freddie Nolan - the name given him by the alcoholic woman down the hall who took him in when his father and mother abandoned him. It was a life of extreme poverty: "Freddie" learned to beg for food at a local deli by asking for scraps for a nonexistent family dog, to use sugar to mask the mold growing on bread taken from others' trash, to cut holes in his shoes to fit his feet, according to a detailed biography prepared for the family.
NEWS
May 28, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony A. Lorraine, 87, of Williamstown, an artist at the former Philadelphia calendar maker Joseph Hoover & Sons for 40 years, died Wednesday, May 21, of heart disease at home. The Hoover firm, at 49th and Market Streets, was founded in 1856 and produced illustrated business wall calendars from the 1920s until it was sold in 1985. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Lorraine grew up near the Ninth Street Italian Market in the same house where his father, Dominic, was born, said his wife, Nancy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2013
WHEN Jerry Ross is inducted into the Philadelphia Music Alliance Walk of Fame on Thursday, he tells me, his mind will be on the stars. Not the stars whose music he has produced over a long career - Jay & the Techniques, Spanky & Our Gang, Jerry Butler, Dee Dee Warwick, the Duprees, the Dreamlovers, the Sapphires - but an astronaut named Jerry Ross (no relation). But more on that later. The earthbound Jerry was born in Philadelphia, in 1933, in time to be positioned for the musical explosion that would change America and the body of world music.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Pitman knows Madeline Brewer as a golden girl with a silvery soprano. The cozy, conservative, church-steepled Gloucester County community has applauded her in upbeat local productions like Bye Bye Birdie and cheered her victory in the Miss Pitman pageant of 2010. Some folks even drove up to Connecticut last summer to see Brewer sing the title role in Liberty , a musical about the statue that inspired the world. But little "Maddie" Brewer as a jailbird with a girlfriend, a neck tattoo, and a heroin habit?
NEWS
February 3, 2013
Pianist and vocalist Ann Rabson, 67, cofounder of the trio Saffire - The Uppity Blues Women, died Wednesday in Virginia after a battle with cancer, her label announced. A barrelhouse blues pianist, Ms. Rabson was also a songwriter and guitarist. She recorded eight albums with Saffire and one solo CD for Alligator Records. She made three solo albums for other labels. Ms. Rabson was best known for her work with Saffire, which she formed with one of her guitar students, Gaye Adegbalola.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
He's James Wiener, D.D.S., by day, his hours filled with crowns, bridges, and treatment plans. But by night, he's country crooner Jimmie Lee, rockin' a "bad-ass attitude" with a lovely in Daisy Dukes on each arm. "Dentistry is a vocation," says Wiener, who owns practices in Audubon, Haddonfield, and Marlton. But "the magic is performing in front of people. " Have I mentioned that Jimmie's stage persona is "the Jersey Outlaw," and that one of his CDs is titled Kid Vegas ?
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Erin Quinn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Generations of Moorestown children have found things to do at the Community House. It's where they go for swimming lessons, music lessons, dance lessons, even etiquette lessons. Then there are the birthday parties and recitals. And after they're grown, residents still gravitate to the mansion on Main Street - for meetings of the garden club and Rotary and scores of other groups. It's a "home away from home," says board of trustees president George Schulmann. That kind of fondness for the Community House prompted an apt gift from a former Moorestown resident, the sculptor Chad Fisher - a life-size bronze of five children playing while holding hands.
NEWS
August 24, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
FLORENCE JONES knew from childhood that she was meant for a career in music. As a student at Barratt Junior High School, she wrote in the yearbook that she wanted to be a music directress. In her 70-year career in music, she did just that, directing choirs and playing the organ at a number of local churches. Florencia Maylee Mack - as she became after marrying William Kenneth Mack - a talented woman whose career also included giving private music lessons and comforting the bereaved with organ music at local funeral homes, died Aug. 16. She was 84 and lived in Kensington.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2012 | BY MARY SYDNOR, For the Daily News
WHEN the commercial real estate market collapsed in 2008, tax attorney John Fowler's job went with it. He, of course, was just one of the millions of Americans left unemployed by the financial crisis. Getting back into the market wouldn't have been easy. "Literally hundreds of attorneys in Philadelphia alone were laid off, so finding a new position at that time was next to impossible. " So instead of filling out job applications, Fowler used the layoff as an opportunity to explore a long-held passion.
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | HACKENSACK RECORD
HACKENSACK, N.J. - Robert Hegyes, the New Jersey-born actor who played Jewish Puerto-Rican wheeler-dealer Juan Luis Pedro Phillipo de Huevos Epstein on the 1970s classic "Welcome Back Kotter," died after an apparent heart attack in his Metuchen, N.J., home yesterday morning. He was 60. Hegyes, who also co-starred on "Cagney and Lacey" and taught occasional master classes at his alma mater, Rowan University, was best known for his work on "Kotter," in which he performed alongside a young John Travolta as one of the tough remedial students known at the Sweathogs.
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