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NEWS
November 20, 2003 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
America's newest music magazine is edited for the 37-year-old Cheltenham native with a busy life, but time to check out the latest Victoria Williams CD. Literally. When Alan Light - editor of Tracks, which debuted this week - thinks of his reader, he pictures Hal Brooks, his old Yale roommate, who represents a ripe demographic ignored by U.S. music publications. Grown-ups who rock. Brooks, now a New York theater director, would call Light wanting to know about records by Williams, the elfin-voiced singer-songwriter, or those alt-country kin Wilco and the Jayhawks.
NEWS
October 16, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Rascal Flatts got a raw deal. When music magazine Blender recently published a list of "The 25 Biggest Wusses . . . Ever!," the country-pop band fronted by Gary LeVox came in seventh. Archetypal sensitive singer-songwriter James Taylor took the top spot. But as any fair-minded observer of their awesomely wimpy concert at the Wachovia Center on Friday would be forced to concede, the trio make Sweet Baby James (who plays the Tower Theatre tomorrow and Wednesday) seem like Metallica.
NEWS
February 19, 2006 | By Dwayne Campbell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Smile fo me daddy (What you lookin at) Let me see ya grill (Let me see my what) Ya, ya grill ya, ya, ya grill (Rob da jewelry store and tell em make me a grill) - "Grillz," by Nelly, with Paul Wall, Ali and Gipp In the weeks leading up to today's NBA All-Star Game in Houston, Alex Khaytin - also known as Alex the Jeweler - has been busy designing not only his trademark neck and wrist ice, but bling for the mouth. The success of "Grillz," the song by Nelly and friends that has hovered at the top of the charts, has prompted more inquiries and orders for "grills," bejeweled gold or platinum caps or "fronts" worn over the front teeth.
NEWS
December 20, 1995 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carol L. Schutzbank, 34, a tireless supporter of Philadelphia's music scene and editor of the music magazine B-Side, died yesterday. Ms. Schutzbank, a Philadelphia resident, suffered a massive heart attack in February, rare for a woman so young with "no risk factors whatsoever," said Harold Eisen, the medical director of Temple University Hospital's heart transplant unit. On Oct. 20, she underwent a heart transplant. She died of cardiac failure after an overwhelming rejection of her new heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2012
Lila Downs Mexican American singer-songwriter Lila Downs has always forged her own path musically, mixing the personal with the political through an enticing fusion of Pan-Latin sounds and lyrical storytelling. Using the current turmoil in her homeland of Mexico as a thematic springboard - and her deep faith in its people as its musical heart - Downs' latest effort, Pecados y Milagros ( Sins and Miracles ) is a mix of originals and reworkings of classic Mexican songs. Each track is accompanied by a devotional painting, or retablo , that Downs commissioned - and each painting helps to illuminate the songs, which touch on everything from morality/spirituality to crossing class lines.
NEWS
October 16, 2007 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Sting? This one really hurts The music magazine Blender has assembled a list of the worst pop lyricists of all time. The list of 40 is both ecumenical and eye-opening, roping in a whole herd of the music business's most sacred cows: Paul McCartney, Jon Bon Jovi, Common, Diddy, Alanis Morissette and Jim Morrison, to name a few. (It also includes some digs at the guys who wrote Bette Midler's "Wind Beneath My Wings. ") But the winner (if that is the right word) is none other than Sting, whom the magazine exorciates for his "mountainous pomposity, cloying spirituality [and]
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1990 | By Barbara Beck, Daily News Staff Writer
"We've written some serious songs. Once, anyway. But I can't remember them," says Tom Pittman whose slightly Southern slow-speaking conjures up visions of back-porch Arkansas. Pittman is one of five members of the Austin Lounge Lizards, a hilarious country/bluegrass/folk group who bring their special brand of Texas satire to this weekend's Bluegrass and Old Time Music Festival at the Plymouth- Whitemarsh High School. Classic Austin Lounge Lizard music is often full of rowdy, hoist-another- beer sing-alongs, laced with yodeling satirical passion for Texas, pickup trucks, acid rain and a good laugh, though not necessarily in that order.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2002 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Look out, Oprah, Rosie and Martha. There's a new egomaniac on the magazine racks. Gene Simmons Tongue, the quarterly that premiered this week, is aimed at bad boys who don't need no stinkin' apostrophe for permission to ogle barely clothed women anxious to pay tribute to Kiss' legendarily loutish bass player. Don't let that mission statement fool you. We're talking publishing landmark here. With a foldout cover on which Hugh Hefner, 76, and Simmons, 52, bookend five nearly indistinguishable former Playboy centerfolds, Tongue's debut issue signals the historic introduction of celebrity-branding into the rapidly Maxim-ized men's magazine market.
NEWS
October 4, 2002 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After a 16-year run on Broadway, Les Miserables is pulling down its barricades and folding its flag of revolution. The mammoth musical hit based on Victor Hugo's epic novel will close March 15 at the Imperial Theatre after 6,612 performances, second only to Cats, Broadway's longest- running show. Written by Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg, the show has grossed $390 million. Ticket sales for Les Miz, which opened March 12, 1987, have lagged since the Sept. 11 attacks, so the producer is bringing back the original 1987 top price of $47.50 Monday through Friday, now through Dec. 20. Harvard mag gets new editor The Harvard Business Review named author Thomas A. Stewart editor yesterday, the Boston Globe reported.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
When Lily Allen's debut album, Alright, Still, finally comes out in America, it's bound to seem a bit anticlimactic. It's not just that the sassy British songwriter topped the U.K. charts with her cheerfully vindictive pop song "Smile" when Alright, Still was released there in July. Or that the enthusiasm for Allen's bouncy tunes and barbed wit is already so strong that the album popped up on a bevy of 2006 best-of lists, including Entertainment Weekly's, which called it "the most exhilarating pop debut in years.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
One morning in March, Sheryl Crow was tuned to a country radio station in Nashville while driving her kids to school. Listening to dudes singing about pickup trucks, moonshine, and girls in their Daisy Dukes, Crow took to Twitter to vent. "Will somebody please play a woman on the radio?" she pleaded. "Any woman. It doesn't have to be me but if I hear one more bro country song I'm gonna vomit!" Sorry, Sheryl. The Bro Country onslaught hasn't abated yet - though there are signs of a backlash, led by the teenage female duo Maddie & Tae. And this summer, Bro Country is coming to the Philadelphia area in a big, Bro-dacious way. Thursday night, Blake Shelton, Bro-friendly star of the TV music reality show The Voice , will play a free concert on the beach in Atlantic City for 60,000 toes-in-the-sand concertgoers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2012
Lila Downs Mexican American singer-songwriter Lila Downs has always forged her own path musically, mixing the personal with the political through an enticing fusion of Pan-Latin sounds and lyrical storytelling. Using the current turmoil in her homeland of Mexico as a thematic springboard - and her deep faith in its people as its musical heart - Downs' latest effort, Pecados y Milagros ( Sins and Miracles ) is a mix of originals and reworkings of classic Mexican songs. Each track is accompanied by a devotional painting, or retablo , that Downs commissioned - and each painting helps to illuminate the songs, which touch on everything from morality/spirituality to crossing class lines.
NEWS
October 16, 2007 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Sting? This one really hurts The music magazine Blender has assembled a list of the worst pop lyricists of all time. The list of 40 is both ecumenical and eye-opening, roping in a whole herd of the music business's most sacred cows: Paul McCartney, Jon Bon Jovi, Common, Diddy, Alanis Morissette and Jim Morrison, to name a few. (It also includes some digs at the guys who wrote Bette Midler's "Wind Beneath My Wings. ") But the winner (if that is the right word) is none other than Sting, whom the magazine exorciates for his "mountainous pomposity, cloying spirituality [and]
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
When Lily Allen's debut album, Alright, Still, finally comes out in America, it's bound to seem a bit anticlimactic. It's not just that the sassy British songwriter topped the U.K. charts with her cheerfully vindictive pop song "Smile" when Alright, Still was released there in July. Or that the enthusiasm for Allen's bouncy tunes and barbed wit is already so strong that the album popped up on a bevy of 2006 best-of lists, including Entertainment Weekly's, which called it "the most exhilarating pop debut in years.
NEWS
October 16, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Rascal Flatts got a raw deal. When music magazine Blender recently published a list of "The 25 Biggest Wusses . . . Ever!," the country-pop band fronted by Gary LeVox came in seventh. Archetypal sensitive singer-songwriter James Taylor took the top spot. But as any fair-minded observer of their awesomely wimpy concert at the Wachovia Center on Friday would be forced to concede, the trio make Sweet Baby James (who plays the Tower Theatre tomorrow and Wednesday) seem like Metallica.
NEWS
February 19, 2006 | By Dwayne Campbell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Smile fo me daddy (What you lookin at) Let me see ya grill (Let me see my what) Ya, ya grill ya, ya, ya grill (Rob da jewelry store and tell em make me a grill) - "Grillz," by Nelly, with Paul Wall, Ali and Gipp In the weeks leading up to today's NBA All-Star Game in Houston, Alex Khaytin - also known as Alex the Jeweler - has been busy designing not only his trademark neck and wrist ice, but bling for the mouth. The success of "Grillz," the song by Nelly and friends that has hovered at the top of the charts, has prompted more inquiries and orders for "grills," bejeweled gold or platinum caps or "fronts" worn over the front teeth.
NEWS
June 14, 2005 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Any discussion about how the four-month child-molestation case will affect Michael Jackson's musical career needs to start with a reminder: He doesn't have one. Not much of one, anyway. Although the self-proclaimed King of Pop was found not guilty yesterday, his musical title has been largely honorary since his albums' sales began plunging from their record-setting peaks in the 1980s. Since then, the commodity that Jackson has been selling is freakish celebrity - Bubbles the Chimp, the Neverland ranch, the likelihood that, at any moment, he might dangle his son over the railing of a hotel balcony.
NEWS
November 20, 2003 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
America's newest music magazine is edited for the 37-year-old Cheltenham native with a busy life, but time to check out the latest Victoria Williams CD. Literally. When Alan Light - editor of Tracks, which debuted this week - thinks of his reader, he pictures Hal Brooks, his old Yale roommate, who represents a ripe demographic ignored by U.S. music publications. Grown-ups who rock. Brooks, now a New York theater director, would call Light wanting to know about records by Williams, the elfin-voiced singer-songwriter, or those alt-country kin Wilco and the Jayhawks.
NEWS
October 4, 2002 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After a 16-year run on Broadway, Les Miserables is pulling down its barricades and folding its flag of revolution. The mammoth musical hit based on Victor Hugo's epic novel will close March 15 at the Imperial Theatre after 6,612 performances, second only to Cats, Broadway's longest- running show. Written by Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg, the show has grossed $390 million. Ticket sales for Les Miz, which opened March 12, 1987, have lagged since the Sept. 11 attacks, so the producer is bringing back the original 1987 top price of $47.50 Monday through Friday, now through Dec. 20. Harvard mag gets new editor The Harvard Business Review named author Thomas A. Stewart editor yesterday, the Boston Globe reported.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2002 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Look out, Oprah, Rosie and Martha. There's a new egomaniac on the magazine racks. Gene Simmons Tongue, the quarterly that premiered this week, is aimed at bad boys who don't need no stinkin' apostrophe for permission to ogle barely clothed women anxious to pay tribute to Kiss' legendarily loutish bass player. Don't let that mission statement fool you. We're talking publishing landmark here. With a foldout cover on which Hugh Hefner, 76, and Simmons, 52, bookend five nearly indistinguishable former Playboy centerfolds, Tongue's debut issue signals the historic introduction of celebrity-branding into the rapidly Maxim-ized men's magazine market.
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