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Music Man

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NEWS
June 4, 1992 | Inquirer photographs by Charles Fox
In Ardmore is a man who makes, repairs and deals in violins, violas and cellos. Paul Stevens, in business there seven years, fills in now and then as a cellist in community orchestras, but says he finds it "enjoyable being able to share music in other people's lives" through the instruments.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2000 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Do not, under any circumstances, dash from the Neil Simon Theatre during curtain calls for The Music Man, which opened Thursday in an irresistible revival directed and choreographed by Susan Stroman. Miss your train, delay your supper date, but stick around for the terrific cherry of a surprise that Stroman has plopped atop this yummy sundae of a musical. To say anything more would spoil the fun, so suffice it to report that this Music Man is in spirited, innocent fettle literally from first note to last.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Music teacher Brian Groder conducts orchestra rehearsals the way comedian Billy Crystal hosted last week's Academy Awards. Witty retorts. Scathing quips. Irreverent repartee. Groder can dish it out and take it with the best of his Jenkintown High School musicians. "I never even heard of My Left Foot," 18-year-old clarinetist Jason Holland said during a rehearsal break between measures of James Swearingen's "Aventura. " "That's because there's no sex, no violence and no car chase, so you didn't notice the commercials when they came on TV," Groder said, followed by chuckles from his audience.
SPORTS
May 15, 2013 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Staff Writer
FIVE BALLS in the air, music everywhere. Five receivers running different routes simultaneously, each somehow managing to find one of those balls from the clutter in the air and catching it . . . And not one crash. Amazing. "You zero in on running your route and keep your head up," Eagles receiver Jeremy Maclin was explaining after yesterday's OTA at NovaCare. "And whatever ball comes your way, you catch it. We don't really know what quarterback is throwing to what route.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2010 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
STEPHEN LYNCH doesn't really care about jokes, which is ironic considering he's a comedian. While his goal onstage is to make people laugh, he's not the average stand-up either. Lynch, who plays the Tower Theater tomorrow, is a musical comedian, crafting acoustic guitar-driven songs with inspiration derived from decidedly strange places. A song called "Craig," for example, is told from the perspective of Jesus' hard-partying brother Craig Christ (sample lyric: "I don't turn water into wine/But into cold Coors Light")
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1994 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The Music Man occurs in what is usually regarded as a more idyllic time and place - a small town in the Midwest early in the century. But the situation in River City, Iowa, that forms the basis for the story of the popular musical, which the Media Theatre for the Performing Arts is presenting, is hardly the stuff of idylls. River City is a town suspicious of outsiders, particularly when they arrive in the form of fast-talking traveling salesmen out to fleece the great American heartland.
NEWS
March 21, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
One of the objections offered by the unions protesting the nonunion production of The Music Man at the Merriam Theater is that while the show is based on the recent Broadway production, it can't really be called a Broadway show because it doesn't use actors who have Broadway experience. That is a valid point. There is a polish and professionalism - something easier to sense than to explain - that Broadway-experienced actors lend to a show that this production of The Music Man does not have.
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Music Man, the Broadway hit musical by Meredith Willson, will be performed at Ridley Senior High School beginning tonight. Director Sandy Stefanowicz is leading a cast and crew of more than 50 students in the classic story of Professor Harold Hill's visit to River City, where he forms a children's band. The high school is on Morton Avenue in Folsom. Show times are 7:30 p.m. today through Saturday. Tickets are $5 for adults, $4 for students, and $3 for seniors. For information, call 610-534-1900.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The Music Man , the classic Broadway musical that opened Wednesday at the Walnut Street Theatre (and runs through Jan. 6), is a shameless, brassy happiness machine and earns that status honestly. In contrast to less substantial portraits in provincialness such as Hairspray , The Music Man has engagingly quirky characters backed up by the sociological truths of post-Victorian heartland America. The espoused moral value of playing in marching bands arises from author Meredith Willson's having played piccolo under John Philip Sousa.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Great day in the morning! River City, Iowa, circa 1912, has come back to life at the Valley Forge Music Fair like some cornfed Brigadoon. It's an occasion for cheers and fireworks. River City's lovely virginal librarian, Marian Paroo, is again resisting the blandishments of that dangerous smoothie, Harold Hill, and the town is once more atwit over Professor Hill's empty promise to give it a band worthy of its standing in the world. That old prune, Mayor Shinn, is back, threatening to upset the apple cart, and his imposing wife, Eulalie (Eulalie Mackecknie Shinn, as she still prefers to be formally known)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* HOUSE OF CARDS. Season 2 starts streaming on Netflix today. * 48 HOURS PRESENTS: THE WHOLE GRITTY CITY. 9 p.m. Saturday, CBS3. SO MAYBE Frank Underwood wouldn't be every woman's Valentine. But Frank (Kevin Spacey), the scheming, homicidal - and, oh, yeah, adulterous - politician at the very heart of Netflix's conspiratorial "House of Cards," doesn't need to please all of us. He really only needs to stay on the right side of his equally terrifying wife, Claire (Robin Wright)
SPORTS
May 15, 2013 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Staff Writer
FIVE BALLS in the air, music everywhere. Five receivers running different routes simultaneously, each somehow managing to find one of those balls from the clutter in the air and catching it . . . And not one crash. Amazing. "You zero in on running your route and keep your head up," Eagles receiver Jeremy Maclin was explaining after yesterday's OTA at NovaCare. "And whatever ball comes your way, you catch it. We don't really know what quarterback is throwing to what route.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Music Man , the classic Broadway musical that opened Wednesday at the Walnut Street Theatre (and runs through Jan. 6), is a shameless, brassy, happiness machine and earns that status honestly. In contrast to less substantial portraits in provincialness such as Hairspray , The Music Man has engagingly quirky characters backed up by the sociological truths of post-Victorian heartland America. The espoused moral value of playing in marching bands arises from author Meredith Willson having played piccolo under John Philip Sousa.
NEWS
June 19, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
BILLY DUNPHY was a happy man who took it on himself to make everybody else happy.   He did it mostly with music. As a disc jockey and singer, he could rock a tavern, a wedding, a private party, birthday, christening, whatever, playing and singing the old standards that made the likes of Sinatra, Crosby, Como and Tom Jones famous, and always with a personal touch. He seemed to know everybody's favorite songs, the songs they grew up with, danced to and fell in love with, and he either played them or sang them himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2011 | BY SHAUN D. BRADY, For the Daily News
AS THE Quaker City String Band rehearsed the wooden soldier march of its latest routine on a chilly December evening, Jim Fox Jr. blended right into the horde of saxophonists playing through "Teddy Bears' Picnic" and "When Johnny Comes Marching Home. " But despite being one alto among many, Fox is responsible for an outsized portion of the cacophony being raised on the second floor of the venerable Mummers band's South Philly clubhouse. Probably half of the Quaker City saxophonists wouldn't be there on New Year's Day if it weren't for Fox. That's literally the case for two of them, Fox's college-age sons, who are carrying on the family tradition.
NEWS
January 1, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Scandalous sex tapes, adultery, and addiction ruled Celebdom in 2010. In other words, it was business as usual. But beyond the squalor, the muck and mire, there burns Love . Love of lust, love of art, love of self, love of money, love of porn, love of controlled substances. Here's a look at some of the more notable love stories of 2010. Weddings! Weddings! Weddings! For all the scandals, 2010 wrapped up all sugar: It was the year of a thousand engagements. Ah, but how many will actually marry?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2010 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
STEPHEN LYNCH doesn't really care about jokes, which is ironic considering he's a comedian. While his goal onstage is to make people laugh, he's not the average stand-up either. Lynch, who plays the Tower Theater tomorrow, is a musical comedian, crafting acoustic guitar-driven songs with inspiration derived from decidedly strange places. A song called "Craig," for example, is told from the perspective of Jesus' hard-partying brother Craig Christ (sample lyric: "I don't turn water into wine/But into cold Coors Light")
NEWS
July 27, 2010 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The music man of Upper Darby Township used to be a Winthrop. Harry Dietzler, executive director of the Upper Darby Summer Stage community theater program, saw himself as the shy little boy in Meredith Willson's Broadway musical about a shifty salesman of band instruments. "My sisters would put on a show in the backyard, and my contribution was putting the needle on the record," said Dietzler, 55, of Upper Darby. Since then, he has overseen hundreds of shows at the Upper Darby Performing Arts Center and has changed from a bashful Winthrop to an upstanding version of The Music Man 's Professor Harold Hill, selling the virtues of musical theater to anyone who will listen.
NEWS
July 27, 2010
Age: Over 35. Neighborhood: Newtown, Bucks County. Job: President of Langweiler Financial Group. Back in the day: Grew up in Wyncote. "Started as a stock broker in Bucks County in the early 1980s . . . started my own firm in the same community in 2003. " Music man: "I played the harmonica professionally with many big names. I realized early on that the harmonica was not going to be my career. So, it's now a healthy addiction while single. I am hoping to find someone to keep my lips occupied when I am not performing.
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