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Music Promoter

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NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alan E. Lott, 67, a legendary music promoter who began his career in the Philadelphia record business, died from a heart attack Wednesday, March 5, in Pasadena, Calif. Mr. Lott climbed the industry ranks to become one of the first black record promoters, said his longtime friend Philadelphia radio personality Sonny Hopson. "He got to be one of the top promoters," said Hopson, who was a major radio personality at WHAT-AM when Mr. Lott got his start. "He was good at that. He was a likable person.
NEWS
June 4, 1993 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
A funeral service will be held tomorrow for Melvin Wallace, a music promoter who served as the editor of Serious Hip Hop Magazine. He was found slain in the third-floor bedroom of his Northern Liberties home over the Memorial Day weekend. He was 34. "The door to musical success was opening in front of him, and his feet were firmly planted in that doorway. Now he has been denied," said Jackie Paul, music editor at Serious Hip Hop, published monthly in Center City. After three years of hard work, she explained, Wallace had landed a record deal with Ruffhouse Records for Theory, his rhythm and blues band.
NEWS
September 10, 1998 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
Stanley A. Culbreth - a music promoter, social activist and former head of the Philadelphia chapter of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference - died yesterday of cancer. He was 67 and a lifelong West Philadelphian. Culbreth, whose Muslim name is Sheik Raqeeb Atif Beyah, took the reins of the SCLC during the early 1970s because "he was not happy with the slow movement of the SCLC here," said Rashid Culbreth, a son. "He thought he could do better as a more aggressive leader.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Before he became the legendary music promoter who helped shape the concert industry over a four-decade career, Larry Magid was a 12-year-old doo-wop fan in West Philly, infected with the music bug by a song called "Sh-Boom. " The 1954 hit by the African American rhythm-and-blues group the Chords "had this refrain, 'Sh-boom, Sh-boom,' " Magid, 68, recalls fondly as he sits in his gold-record-lined office at the Piazza at Schmidts in Northern Liberties. "It made no sense, but it was something so different, so new. And you felt a connection to the music.
NEWS
June 7, 1993 | by Gloria Campisi and Jack McGuire, Daily News Staff Writers
At Melvin Wallace's funeral, members of the all-Latino rhythm- and-blues group he was shepherding to success struggled to sing the song he loved best, "Falling Rain. " But the words just wouldn't come out. James Cartagena, 22, of Theory, which performs in a style popularized by Boyz II Men and is on the brink of making it thanks to Wallace, 34, a music promoter murdered over the Memorial Day weekend, was able to give Wallace's mother a comforting message. "We might have lost Melvin, I told his mom, but you gained five more kids (the group)
NEWS
May 31, 1993 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A local music producer and promoter was found shot to death Saturday night in the bedroom of his rowhouse in the Northern Liberties section of the city, police said. Police said Melvin Wallace, 34, had two gunshot wounds to the back of his head. Sgt. Dennis Murray of the homicide division said robbery appeared to have been the motive for the slaying. A handgun was recovered at the scene, Murray said. A neighbor called police after becoming concerned when Wallace didn't answer a knock on the door.
NEWS
June 25, 1993 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jose Cruz shot Philadelphia music promoter Melvin Wallace twice in the back of the head "to scare him" and ward off unwanted sexual advances by Wallace in the bedroom of the music promoter's home in Northern Liberties, he told police. In a statement to police read yesterday at a preliminary hearing, Cruz, 19, said that he grew up in Wallace's neighborhood and that he had had a sexual relationship with Wallace "for money" since he was 9 or 10 years old. Wallace, 34, was the local promoter of a rhythm and blues group called Theory, and had been an editor of Serious Hip Hop magazine.
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Margaret C. Nyce Waltner, 68, formerly of Mount Airy, a blues music promoter, jewelry maker, and book editor, died Tuesday, Sept. 2, at a hospice facility in Scranton after a yearlong battle with esophageal cancer. Friends said they knew Mrs. Waltner ("Peg") as a "live wire," a woman whose enthusiasm for life carried others along with her. Mrs. Waltner and her husband, Douglas, co-founded the Philadelphia Blues Machine in 1985 to promote blues performances in Philadelphia and beyond.
NEWS
February 24, 1994 | By Jeff Eckhoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The folks at the Boy Scouts of America keep it simple: If you want to achieve their highest honor, you have to put a lot of work into some project that benefits your community. For most prospective Eagle Scouts, that means spending several dozen hours designing improvements to the neighborhood park. Or masterminding a charity drive. Or building a new handrail for that rickety walkway at the local church. Ryan Walker, however, believes in a different type of community service - namely, offering heavy metal music and blowing the roof off a rented auditorium to raise money for a good cause.
NEWS
April 11, 2004 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
From the recording studio in the attached garage at his Willingboro home, Ed Blaze, a music promoter, hopes to share in the American dream. "I always had the passion to do music," he said. Before he eased into the music scene, Blaze said, he visited area clubs and attended parties to get a feel for what was popular. "I went to parties here to see what people liked," he said. About three years ago, he launched Active 4 All Entertainment, a promotion company that assists in bringing concerts to clubs and arenas in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New York and Washington.
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NEWS
October 27, 2014
ISSUE | N.J. REBATES Give us the break Gov. Christie continues to revise New Jerseyans' homestead rebates. I recently paid my property taxes and asked about the status of my rebate. The current rebate due in the second quarter of 2014 was for the year 2012. I was told that Christie has postponed this payment until mid-2015, a full three years after it is due. In 2011, he greatly reduced the amount due for the year 2009 - for me, by $1,000. The next year, he changed the system to be issued as a credit in the second quarter of the tax year, again two years behind the actual year.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard R. Wisneski, 71, of Cape May, a disc jockey and promoter of musical events, died of kidney failure Sunday, Aug. 3, at Cape Regional Medical Center in Cape May Court House. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Wisneski graduated from Edison High School and served as an Army medic in Vietnam and in the New Jersey Army National Guard. "He started out in radio in Pottstown," Phil Pizzi, a friend and business colleague, said. At that time, "he was a DJ, a radio personality. " Mr. Wisneski soon became an entrepreneur.
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Margaret C. Nyce Waltner, 68, formerly of Mount Airy, a blues music promoter, jewelry maker, and book editor, died Tuesday, Sept. 2, at a hospice facility in Scranton after a yearlong battle with esophageal cancer. Friends said they knew Mrs. Waltner ("Peg") as a "live wire," a woman whose enthusiasm for life carried others along with her. Mrs. Waltner and her husband, Douglas, co-founded the Philadelphia Blues Machine in 1985 to promote blues performances in Philadelphia and beyond.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alan E. Lott, 67, a legendary music promoter who began his career in the Philadelphia record business, died from a heart attack Wednesday, March 5, in Pasadena, Calif. Mr. Lott climbed the industry ranks to become one of the first black record promoters, said his longtime friend Philadelphia radio personality Sonny Hopson. "He got to be one of the top promoters," said Hopson, who was a major radio personality at WHAT-AM when Mr. Lott got his start. "He was good at that. He was a likable person.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Before he became the legendary music promoter who helped shape the concert industry over a four-decade career, Larry Magid was a 12-year-old doo-wop fan in West Philly, infected with the music bug by a song called "Sh-Boom. " The 1954 hit by the African American rhythm-and-blues group the Chords "had this refrain, 'Sh-boom, Sh-boom,' " Magid, 68, recalls fondly as he sits in his gold-record-lined office at the Piazza at Schmidts in Northern Liberties. "It made no sense, but it was something so different, so new. And you felt a connection to the music.
NEWS
February 8, 2008 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an interview from prison three months ago, Alton "Ace Capone" Coles said he was not the cocaine-trafficking drug kingpin a 197-count federal indictment made him out to be. "These charges are not who I am," Coles, 34, said in a phone conversation from the Federal Detention Center, where he was being held pending trial. "God willing, a jury will look at the evidence and see that. " For the last four weeks, a U.S. District Court jury has, in fact, been looking at and listening to the evidence in the drug-trafficking case against Coles and five codefendants.
NEWS
August 28, 2005 | By Julie Shaw INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The phone rings in Gene Shay's cramped basement in Wynnewood, which is lined with CDs and records. It's Sims Delaney-Potthoff, the founder and mandolin player of Harmonious Wail, a Wisconsin string jazz band. He is looking to book East Coast shows in February. And the first person he calls in the Philadelphia area, as a friend and professionally, is Shay. Shay is Philadelphia's legendary folk music DJ. The Folk Show With Gene Shay has been on WXPN-FM (88.5) since 1995, now heard 8 to 11 p.m. Sundays.
NEWS
April 11, 2004 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
From the recording studio in the attached garage at his Willingboro home, Ed Blaze, a music promoter, hopes to share in the American dream. "I always had the passion to do music," he said. Before he eased into the music scene, Blaze said, he visited area clubs and attended parties to get a feel for what was popular. "I went to parties here to see what people liked," he said. About three years ago, he launched Active 4 All Entertainment, a promotion company that assists in bringing concerts to clubs and arenas in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New York and Washington.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | by Jim Smith Daily News Staff Writer
Payday for members of the drug ring at 8th and Allegheny was Sunday, the FBI learned. Every Sunday, reputed boss Maurice Lewis would ensure that cash-filled envelopes, containing salaries and bonuses, went to his managers, drug "baggers," street-sales staff, lookouts and "gun men. " Operating for a decade at the same site, the drug ring grossed millions of dollars on cocaine sales, mostly the $10-bag variety, federal authorities contend....
NEWS
March 1, 2000 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Barry Abrams, 64, a music-promotion man who helped take numerous careers to the top of the charts, died Monday at Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia. A Cherry Hill resident since the early 1970s, he was born and raised in Philadelphia. Mr. Abrams became known as one of the nation's leading recording-artist promotion men by getting records, often for new young artists, airtime in Philadelphia, one of the nation's most respected music markets. He worked in the industry from 1957 to 1981.
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