CollectionsMusic School
IN THE NEWS

Music School

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1999 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The flags flew at half-staff at Temple when Esther Boyer Griswold died last month at age 95. Griswold, whose name the university's music school bears, was among the most distinguished alumna in the university's 115-year history, and, without doubt, its most generous. Griswold, who graduated from Temple in 1927, was known for her kindness, her keen intelligence, her independence and her love of music, Jeffrey Cornelius, the dean of the Esther Boyer School of Music, said this week.
NEWS
November 17, 2000 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than a half century, legions of music students passed through the studios of the Granoff School of Music at 21st and Spruce Streets. Some students, such as Dizzy Gillespie and John Coltrane, became jazz greats. Some achieved stature with world-class orchestras in such cities as Philadelphia and Houston. And some just learned to love the violin, guitar, piano, trumpet, drums, saxophone, and even the harmonica. Isadore Granoff, 99, the violinist and teacher behind the renowned Philadelphia music school, died in his sleep Saturday in his Center City apartment.
NEWS
April 30, 1986 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The prestigious New School of Music and Temple University announced yesterday that they would join forces, with the New School's 50 full-time students switching from its Center City building to Temple's main campus in North Philadelphia. The merger would save the New School, a small college founded 43 years ago to train musicians in ensemble and orchestra, and expand the academic offerings in Temple's 600-student College of Music. The New School, at 21st and Spruce Streets, had been facing an uncertain future because its expenses outstripped its income.
NEWS
April 11, 2001 | By William R. Macklin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David L. Stone, 84, the brilliant, multifaceted piano prodigy who founded Temple University's College of Music, died of liver failure Sunday at his home in Doylestown. During a 40-year career at Temple, Dr. Stone held every important post in the music department and built a reputation as a wit and raconteur adept at using charm to woo distinguished artists to the faculty of the North Philadelphia school. "His work on behalf of generations of university students resonates throughout the profession," Jeffrey Cornelius, dean of Temple's Esther Boyer College of Music, said.
NEWS
November 4, 2002 | By Anthony S. Twyman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jesse Bermudez has a vision for a vacant lot in the barrio in North Philadelphia. He also has raised $4 million, and counting, to make it happen. While others see a city-owned parking lot at Fifth and Huntingdon Streets, Bermudez envisions a music and cultural center with a 400-seat banquet hall, a 500-seat performance center, a Latin music school for children and adults, and a large kitchen for catering events. Children will learn from instructors such as Cuban pianist and composer Elio Villafranca.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2001 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
No one was much surprised to learn that Adele W. Paxson would be looking after the Academy of Vocal Arts even after her death. Her mother, Helen Corning Warden, had founded the tuition-free opera school in 1934, and friends say that Paxson, chairwoman of the board, had a love for the school rivaled perhaps only by her doting on all things equestrian. But even Paxson's daughter was surprised to learn the extent of the generosity contained in her will. Paxson, who died in December at the age of 87, left $7 million to the academy - a munificent sum for a school so small its top enrollment at any given time is 30 nascent Toscas, Mimis, Otellos and Papagenos.
NEWS
September 24, 1991 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
When Shirley Ames, a big-haired greenhorn from South Philadelphia, first set foot inside the High School for Creative and Performing Arts in 1988, she half expected to run into a dancing deb straight out of some schmaltzy TV show. Instead, the freshman plowed into a bulky upperclassman with a spider painted on her face. "It was my first day and I stepped on the combat boots of this girl," recalled Ames, now a senior vocal major whose hair has shrunk considerably. "And I thought I was going to die. " But rather than batter Ames, the post-punk Morticia Addams shrugged off the collision and directed the youngster to her first-period class.
NEWS
October 1, 1999 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
When Orlando Cole entered the Curtis Institute of Music 75 years ago, the teenager paid $500 for the privilege of studying the cello. A few years later, Curtis founder Mary Louise Curtis Bok began the school's tuition-free, all-scholarship policy - setting up extremely tough admission standards to what has long been considered the world's most prestigious conservatory. Back in 1924, however, said Cole: "I don't think I even had to audition. " The cellist, who still teaches there, celebrated his 91st birthday a few weeks back.
NEWS
November 24, 2002 | By Maureen Fitzgerald INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After years of teaching private and classroom guitar lessons, Michael Kaufman saw the benefits of both: the importance of individual attention and the fun of learning in a group. And he had a dream: to teach small group lessons to students at his own music school. A few years of working in technology threw another ingredient into the mix - high-tech music equipment for learning, performing and recording. Five weeks ago, his dream opened in the form of the Music Garden at the Village Walk shopping center on Route 70 in Cherry Hill.
NEWS
April 6, 1995 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's not reincarnation, although it does ring of deja vu. Robert dePasquale's father ran a music school in the 1920s, but it never quite succeeded. So 13 years ago, the violinist of the dePasquale String Quartet and his wife, Ellen Fisher, founded the Fort Washington-based Academy of Children's Music. The institution has developed into a Suzuki music school that not only solicits gifted students, but reaches out to mentally challenged children and adults. Because of that emphasis, dePasquale and Fisher welcomed the opportunity to collaborate with the Indian Creek Foundation in Harleysville, which provides services for people with developmental disabilities.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2015 | By Daniel Webster, For The Inquirer
Violinist Barbara Govatos once imagined her hometown as fertile ground in which to plant a chamber music festival. Her instincts were good. The Delaware Chamber Music Festival returned for its 30th season Friday with its founder leading the festival quartet at the Music School of Delaware in a program that skirted the usual to revive works featuring string bass. The festival has evolved in more than a generation, offering young musicians and established performers in repertoire that revived classics but included new works and genuine surprises.
NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Chester County piano teacher has been charged with sexually abusing three 6-year-old students he taught at the Malvern School of Music, prosecutors said. Anton Fomin of East Pikeland Township is accused of abusing the students during private lessons at the school, officials said. "Sexual predators try to put themselves into a position where they have access to children," Chester County District Attorney Thomas Hogan said in a statement. "This defendant was a music teacher, trusted by parents, with unfettered access to vulnerable children.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
IN A 2008 interview, piano teacher Anton Fomin described his work: "Teaching is like playing piano with my students' hands. It's very gratifying and satisfying. " Yesterday, Fomin, 44, was charged with sexually abusing three 6-year-old pupils, Chester County District Attorney Tom Hogan said. The instructor is accused of using his position at the Malvern School of Music - from which he has since been fired - to abuse two girls and a boy during one-on-one lessons. The allegations came to light last week, when a girl's father called Malvern police to report that the mother of another 6-year-old pupil had told him that her daughter said Fomin "puts his hand in [her]
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
SUSAN WERNER could have a lucrative future as a composer for hire - crafting clever, custom "special material" that makes listeners feel good about a specific topic, person or product. For sure, she's now showing her forte on "Hayseed," a ripely entertaining song cycle that celebrates (mostly) the farmer's life. It comes with the same sort of sharp insights, warm heart and wry humor this once-Philly based singer/songwriter brought to the dinner table in other one-of-a-kind themed projects, such as the wicked good, 2007 spirituals-for-agnostics "The Gospel Truth" and her stone-Cole Porter-ing of quasi-standards, 2009's "Classics.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Karie Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although most schools in the area were closed Monday for Presidents' Day, the halls of the Philadelphia High School for Girls were filled with the sounds of aspiring young musicians and singers belting notes in a foreign language and pounding on drums. The high school hosted the first Philadelphia Festival of Young Musicians, an all-day music program featuring more than 200 third- to sixth-grade students from city public, private, and charter schools who gathered to rehearse and then perform in a concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
If you combed through the piano recital programs of the coming year and put the most forbidding pieces into one concert, you'd have Ieva Jokubaviciute's recital Thursday at Settlement Music School. In the program, titled " New Century, New Paths" and presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, this fully matured Lithuanian pianist skillfully guided one's ears through Debussy, Schoenberg, Scriabin, Janacek, and Berg in performances that confidently created a trajectory from which all the composers benefited.
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hundreds of anxious parents packed the auditorium as their children lined hallways and swarmed around teachers in classrooms, clutching sheet music and instruments. The mission: Excel at a Saturday morning audition, wowing teachers to be selected for the hypercompetitive Girard Academic Music Program, one of the city's few magnet schools at the middle-school level and the only one specializing in music. The South Philadelphia middle and high school also has a strong academic curriculum and always attracts many more applicants than it can accept.
NEWS
January 6, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of anxious parents packed the auditorium as their kids lined hallways and swarmed around teachers in classrooms, clutching sheet music and instruments. The mission: excel at a Saturday morning audition, wowing teachers to be selected into the hypercompetitive Girard Academic Music Program, one of the city's few magnet schools at the middle school level and the only one specializing in music. The South Philadelphia middle and high school also has a strong academic curriculum, and always attracts many more applicants than it can accept.
NEWS
November 10, 2012 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The mood was tense, but the music was beautiful. Officials at GAMP - Girard Academic Music Program, the city's elite public magnet school for gifted musicians - have been notified that they will lose the yellow school buses that transport middle school students from points around Philadelphia to the school at 22d and Ritner Streets. So on Thursday night, dozens gathered in the GAMP auditorium for a concert and rally to voice their displeasure to the Philadelphia School District.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | BY ANDREW EISER, Daily News Staff Writer
MAX HARRIS, a 7th-grader at the Girard Academic Music Program, leaves his Mount Airy home each morning to catch a yellow school bus. But his route - and his attendance - may be in jeopardy next year because the district is threatening to remove bus services. "I'm not sure I'd want to make that commute," Harris said, holding an electric guitar in its case during a protest Wednesday afternoon in front of the School District of Philadelphia offices on North Broad Street. His school's 102-member marching band and color guard performed.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|