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NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Anthony Celano, 96, a music-shop owner who, as mayor of Hatboro from 1981 to 2005, married more than 2,000 couples, died Tuesday, Oct. 30, at Luther Woods Nursing & Rehabilitation Center in Hatboro. When Mr. Celano was elected mayor for the first time, he didn't belong to a political party, although he would become a Republican. After operating Hatboro Music Shop for 36 years, however, he knew everybody, he later told The Inquirer. Before the election, cars and vans drove around for weeks with unsolicited, homemade "Go With the Flow, Vote for Joe" signs.
NEWS
April 23, 1993 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Rodger R. Owen, CEO of Bucks County Nut & Coffee Co., is frankly floored by the smashing success of his new coffee stand in The Market at 30th Street Station. The stand - which opened in November 1992 - is already the second-biggest moneymaker among the company's 17 outlets, trailing only the one at Union Station in Washington. "That just stunned me," Owen said. David Rosenberg has seen similar results for Candy Express. One of 42 units in the Maryland-based chain, the 30th Street store is "consistently in the top five" in profits, said Rosenberg, Candy Express' top man. If you haven't visited 30th Street Station for some time, you're in for a $100 million surprise.
NEWS
May 3, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
The sheer number of songs in I Love a Piano wouldn't surprise an Irving Berlin scholar - but their power and number astounded in Ray Roderick and Michael Berkeley's musical tribute. More than 50 selections from Berlin's songbook fill the delightful 95-minute production at the Walnut Street Independence Studio on 3. With a cast led by Ellie Mooney and Owen Pelesh, these songs soared, charmed with their winsomeness, and reminded listeners - with a nostalgic sense of loss - of the age in which Berlin wrote the lyrics and music for most of his greatest hits.
NEWS
January 13, 1998 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ralph Bonds, 74, owner of Ralph and Buddy Bonds Pianos and Organs in Strafford, died of cancer Friday at his home in Rosemont. Mr. Bonds and his brother, Buddy, performed for many years, playing twin organs on the stage and in clubs all over the United States. During the 1950s, the brothers cut about 12 albums of organ music for Decca and Columbia Records under the title Ralph and Buddy Bonds Play the Twin Organs. In 1973, they opened their piano, organ and keyboard store in the Strafford Shopping Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Once, a low-key delight set on the sidewalks of Dublin, is about a busker and a flower-seller who meet on Grafton Street and connect through his plaintive ballads. He is a Dublin folk-rocker, she a Prague pianist, classically trained, who borrows the Steinway in a music shop to demonstrate her skills to him. Their courtship is physically chaste, musically passionate and deeply satisfying. In this handmade version of the studio-manufactured tunefest Music and Lyrics, the Guy (Glen Hansard, scruffy lead singer of the Frames)
NEWS
June 29, 1997 | By Eric Dyer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
By all accounts, the Amish-run farm market in the old Williamstown Shopping Center has been quite a success, with its fresh meats and baked treats from Lancaster County attracting lots of customers. Until recently, the same couldn't be said of the businesses that occupied the rest of the old Black Horse Pike plaza. Situated on seven acres, the old 60,000-square-foot shopping center thrived in the 1950s and 1960s, but fell into disuse several years back when the Buy-Rite discount lumber yard was boarded up. Wilmington businessmen Albert Vietri and Joseph Capano purchased the property for $2 million.
NEWS
June 2, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Once , a low-key delight set on the sidewalks of Dublin, is about a busker and a flower-seller who meet on Grafton Street and connect through his plaintive ballads. He is a Dublin folk-rocker, she a Prague pianist, classically trained, who borrows the Steinway in a music shop to demonstrate her skills to him. Their courtship is physically chaste, musically passionate and deeply satisfying. In this handmade version of the studio-manufactured tunefest Music and Lyrics , the Guy (Glen Hansard, scruffy lead singer of the Frames)
NEWS
April 14, 1992 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
Sure, Bob Marley plays at K mart and the Gipsy Kings stomp at Sears. But there are still plenty of specialty stores, mom-and-pop operations that sell tapes and discs of ethnic music, next to mud cloth, amaretto cookies and tam-o'-shanters. For starters, there's the West Indian Sound Center, a store at 60th and Arch streets that stocks the latest releases of Steely and Clevie (the Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis of reggae). At the other end of town is Tullycross, an Irish shop at Front and South that sells Irish and Celtic sounds.
NEWS
July 19, 1992 | By Anne L. Boles, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The books pile high around Dorothy Hirt, who tends her Downingtown shop as lovingly as some do a garden. Retired now from teaching, she weeds through ceiling-high stacks, pruning selections from the Bronte sisters to animal husbandry. The cluttered, creaky shelves and the musty smell of aging books lend the Country Shepherd a timeless air. The first-time customer might never suspect the shop has been open two years, not two generations, replacing a barbershop. With its quirky charm and loyal clientele, it has weathered the recession well, she said.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | By Mary Jane Fine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bill Alberts, the music man, settles a guitar on his knee and does what he does best: He strums a little, picks a little, sings a little and gives a lot to yet another student. "What you're doing is letting your right hand relax, just swing back and forth," Alberts says. He demonstrates, making what is difficult look easy. "Let's do this: Let's go through the chords. " Ken Cooper gropes for the notes, tries again, relaxes and plays them. Alberts watches and listens, low-key and infinitely patient.
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NEWS
May 3, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
The sheer number of songs in I Love a Piano wouldn't surprise an Irving Berlin scholar - but their power and number astounded in Ray Roderick and Michael Berkeley's musical tribute. More than 50 selections from Berlin's songbook fill the delightful 95-minute production at the Walnut Street Independence Studio on 3. With a cast led by Ellie Mooney and Owen Pelesh, these songs soared, charmed with their winsomeness, and reminded listeners - with a nostalgic sense of loss - of the age in which Berlin wrote the lyrics and music for most of his greatest hits.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
One thing about Once   : It's not the movie. It's the international touring show budded off from the Broadway show budded off, in turn, from the movie. Starring Irish musician Glen Hansard and Czech musician Markéta Irglová, Once was a dark-horse smash in 2007, earning two Grammys and an Oscar. Persuasive, passionate, it's a busker's love story. But Once in Philadelphia (Academy of Music, through Nov. 10) is different. Sure, it has the guitar-playing Guy and the pianist Girl, plus Hansard and Irglová's poignant songs.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Anthony Celano, 96, a music-shop owner who, as mayor of Hatboro from 1981 to 2005, married more than 2,000 couples, died Tuesday, Oct. 30, at Luther Woods Nursing & Rehabilitation Center in Hatboro. When Mr. Celano was elected mayor for the first time, he didn't belong to a political party, although he would become a Republican. After operating Hatboro Music Shop for 36 years, however, he knew everybody, he later told The Inquirer. Before the election, cars and vans drove around for weeks with unsolicited, homemade "Go With the Flow, Vote for Joe" signs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It's Record Store Day. That means it's the day to get out and support your local independent music shop. And there are a bunch in the area, still living and breathing in this digital age, from a.k.a. music in Old City to Main Street Music in Manayunk, Hideaway Music in Chestnut Hill to Beautiful World Syndicate in South Philadelphia, Repo Records on South Street to Marvelous in University City to Siren Records in Doylestown. They're among more than 900 indie shops around the United States, and more than 1,700 worldwide, that are participating in the fifth annual Record Store Day, which provides at least two good reasons for music lovers to mingle with fellow enthusiasts at the local Mom & Pop while holding some actual physical product in their hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Once, a low-key delight set on the sidewalks of Dublin, is about a busker and a flower-seller who meet on Grafton Street and connect through his plaintive ballads. He is a Dublin folk-rocker, she a Prague pianist, classically trained, who borrows the Steinway in a music shop to demonstrate her skills to him. Their courtship is physically chaste, musically passionate and deeply satisfying. In this handmade version of the studio-manufactured tunefest Music and Lyrics, the Guy (Glen Hansard, scruffy lead singer of the Frames)
NEWS
June 2, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Once , a low-key delight set on the sidewalks of Dublin, is about a busker and a flower-seller who meet on Grafton Street and connect through his plaintive ballads. He is a Dublin folk-rocker, she a Prague pianist, classically trained, who borrows the Steinway in a music shop to demonstrate her skills to him. Their courtship is physically chaste, musically passionate and deeply satisfying. In this handmade version of the studio-manufactured tunefest Music and Lyrics , the Guy (Glen Hansard, scruffy lead singer of the Frames)
NEWS
January 13, 1998 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ralph Bonds, 74, owner of Ralph and Buddy Bonds Pianos and Organs in Strafford, died of cancer Friday at his home in Rosemont. Mr. Bonds and his brother, Buddy, performed for many years, playing twin organs on the stage and in clubs all over the United States. During the 1950s, the brothers cut about 12 albums of organ music for Decca and Columbia Records under the title Ralph and Buddy Bonds Play the Twin Organs. In 1973, they opened their piano, organ and keyboard store in the Strafford Shopping Center.
NEWS
June 29, 1997 | By Eric Dyer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
By all accounts, the Amish-run farm market in the old Williamstown Shopping Center has been quite a success, with its fresh meats and baked treats from Lancaster County attracting lots of customers. Until recently, the same couldn't be said of the businesses that occupied the rest of the old Black Horse Pike plaza. Situated on seven acres, the old 60,000-square-foot shopping center thrived in the 1950s and 1960s, but fell into disuse several years back when the Buy-Rite discount lumber yard was boarded up. Wilmington businessmen Albert Vietri and Joseph Capano purchased the property for $2 million.
NEWS
July 21, 1994 | By Nancy Lawson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
His name has never been a household word, but composer Leroy Anderson's songs are as American as a McDonald's apple pie. Especially "The Syncopated Clock" - now the theme of a McDonald's TV commercial. Such commercialism does not bother Eleanor Anderson, the wife of the late composer of "Sleigh Ride" and other favorites that have seeped into the American subconscious. In fact, Anderson encourages anything that will make her husband's name as well-known as his songs, including a postage stamp for which she has been lobbying.
NEWS
April 23, 1993 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Rodger R. Owen, CEO of Bucks County Nut & Coffee Co., is frankly floored by the smashing success of his new coffee stand in The Market at 30th Street Station. The stand - which opened in November 1992 - is already the second-biggest moneymaker among the company's 17 outlets, trailing only the one at Union Station in Washington. "That just stunned me," Owen said. David Rosenberg has seen similar results for Candy Express. One of 42 units in the Maryland-based chain, the 30th Street store is "consistently in the top five" in profits, said Rosenberg, Candy Express' top man. If you haven't visited 30th Street Station for some time, you're in for a $100 million surprise.
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