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Music Teacher

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NEWS
October 12, 2007 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was just a few hours since Camden music teacher Jamal Dickerson had been stunned to learn he was one of the latest recipients of a Milken National Educator Award and already had plans on how to spend a big chunk of his $25,000 prize: A scholarship for one of his graduates, a gifted trumpeter who could barely play when he met her. Then help for the Creative Arts High School, where he teaches, and the Unity Community Center, an inner-city youth...
NEWS
April 3, 1989 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Vernon Lathan, a teacher at the Settlement Music School in Queen Village and music director for a number of churches, died Wednesday. He was 62 and lived in Harrisburg. Lathan, an organist, pianist and choral director, was a well regarded figure on the Philadelphia music scene for more than three decades. He had taught at the main branch of the Settlement school on Queen Street for 18 years and for 22 years was minister of music at Wharton Wesley United Methodist Church. For the past five years he had served as minister of music at Mount Zion Baptist Church.
NEWS
June 17, 1987 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Vincent R. Stango, a retired music teacher for the Philadelphia public school system, a theater musician and union official, died Monday. He was 66 and lived in South Philadelphia. Stango retired about two years ago after more than 30 years with the School District. He last taught at Philadelphia High School for Girls. A trombone player, he had spent some 38 years working nights and summers in pit orchestras at Philadelphia theaters. Orestes Stango, Vincent's father, had been a musician who spent many years on the road before going into barbering and then finally opening Stango's, a taproom at 15th and Dickinson streets.
NEWS
March 17, 1997 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Barbara E. "Bobbie" Cohen Thompson, 51, a longtime Evesham Township School District string instrument music teacher, died Saturday at her Marlton home from cancer. Mrs. Thompson was an instrumental music teacher for the Evesham Township School District where she founded the string instrument program in 1976. She was the director of the Marlton Middle School Orchestra, which she started shortly after arriving in the district. While the district had an instrumental music program when Mrs. Thompson was hired, it did not have a stringed instrumental program, recalled Jean Ricketts, a retired assistant superintendent.
NEWS
May 4, 1998 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
George S. Shaw, 71, a music teacher in Camden city schools for more than 30 years, died Friday at his Audubon home. An Audubon resident for the last 34 years, he was raised in North Camden and was a 1944 graduate of Camden Catholic High School, where he was in the school band for four years. Mr. Shaw was an instrumental music teacher for Camden city public schools from 1956 until he retired in 1990. He was a much-beloved teacher in the district, said Bart Leff, public relations director for Camden schools.
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | By Terence Samuel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ann Davis Bradley, 59, who taught music for 17 years at the Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr, died Saturday at her home in Strafford, Chester County, after a long illness. Mrs. Bradley taught violin and guitar, and shared with her students her passion for music. During her time at Baldwin, Mrs. Bradley, also a poet, wrote, composed and staged many musical productions. Her musical abilities also led her to a major role in the productions of her church, the United Church of Christ at Valley Forge, of which she was a member for 25 years.
NEWS
August 3, 1989 | By Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The ashes of Edna L. Wilson, a gifted music teacher and essayist, will be returned this weekend to her native Virginia. Wilson, who spent the past 49 years here, died late last month. She was 88 and lived in Southwest Philadelphia. Wilson grew up in Harrisonburg, Va., and attended Virginia State College, where she earned a B.A. in education. She arrived in Philadelphia in 1940, and was hired as a technical writer at Frankford Arsenal. After the outbreak of World War II, a job opened up in the arsenal's drafting department, which Wilson applied for and won. "Our family believes she was the first black - man or woman - to be hired as a draftsman," said her nephew, Edwin Van Brunt Wilson.
NEWS
December 9, 1987 | By Cheryl Baisden, Special to The Inquirer
Over the last 19 years, Pitman High School music director Gordon L. Wilson has seen a lot of students come and go. On Dec. 23, Wilson will be the one going, and the students will be the ones wishing the teacher good luck as Wilson leaves for Arizona. "I guess it's a little strange," said Wilson. "Usually, the teacher stays, while the students move on to new lives. This time, the teacher is leaving the students behind. " Wilson, 47, informed his music students in April that he would not be returning after the district's winter break.
NEWS
October 19, 1986 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
When the Chester County Suzuki organization asked Linda Wear Fiore to act as hostess for the Suzuki Talent Education Tour, her first reaction was to worry. For 13 years, she has used the Suzuki method to teach children to play musical instruments at her home in Glenmoor, north of Exton. But that was teaching. This was something else. She had to line up host families for 10 Japanese students and six chaperones; arrange meals for three days, and sell enough tickets to the concert by the touring Japanese Suzuki students.
NEWS
February 8, 1987 | By Frank Langfitt, Special to The Inquirer
Joseph R. Carmitchell, 44, of Bala Cynwyd, an instrumental music teacher in the Lower Merion school system, died Jan. 31 at Metropolitan Hospital in Philadelphia after a lengthy illness. Born in Lancaster, Pa., in 1942, Mr. Carmitchell was the son of William H. Carmitchell and Ruth Carmitchell. He received his bachelor's degree from the Eastman School of Music at the University of Rochester, N.Y., in 1964, and his master's degree in performance from Temple University in 1967. He taught instrumental music in elementary schools including Merion, Cynwyd and Narberth Elementary from 1965 until 1980, when he became the instrumental music teacher at the Welsh Valley Middle School in Narberth.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
At home in Mullica Hill, Doreen Taylor writes and sings the songs she hopes will help make her a star - and help charities that are close to her heart. "I say that I'm a singer-songwriter, even though the stereotype is a girl in a flowery dress with a guitar, singing folk-type music," she says. "I'm definitely not folk-y. " I must agree, having heard Taylor do a live-in-the-studio take of an uplifting ballad titled, appropriately, "Unstoppable," just minutes before. "Again?"
NEWS
February 7, 2016 | Natalie Pompilio
Natalie Pompilio is a Philadelphia writer Gathered in a classroom at Bristol Township's Harry S Truman High School, about 25 students from Drummers With Attitude are showing me what each can do with two sticks and an overturned bucket. And while the music was incredible, the change in some of the players is even more stunning. The boy who hadn't looked me in the eyes when I arrived? He is flipping his sticks in his hands and casting me side looks, grinning. Another teenager, who told me he doesn't like to show emotion, has his eyes closed and his lips slightly open as he plays, moving his body to the beat.
NEWS
September 9, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
SEATED IN A circle behind their 15 African drums last spring, the Laura Waring School kids smiled when Mary Schumacher, their music teacher, said, "OK, we're going warp speed, right?" She set a blistering pace. Her young drummers stayed right with her. Then, each child took a turn on the lead, drumming out his or her own beats that the other kids echoed, call-and-response style. The '50s-era public school classroom, on Green Street near 18th in Spring Garden, rocked with hard-driving rhythm, intense furrowing of young brows and satisfied grins all around at the end. The little drummers of Waring are a big miracle at a time when chronically cash-strapped Philadelphia public schools have been stripped of their music and arts programs and turned into creativity deserts that offer no artistic stimulation to young minds hungering for it. The crisis of desperately deprived schools is shockingly clear on the crowd-funding website, donorschoose.org, where hundreds of Philadelphia classroom teachers personally beg the public to fund pencils, paper, books and other essentials because the school district stopped paying for bare-bones needs years ago. Last fall at Waring, where 100 percent of the children are from economically disadvantaged families, principal Brianna Dunn boldly decided to rely on the generosity of neighborhood community groups to buy basic supplies so she could scrape together enough money from her threadbare budget to hire a full-time music...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two new half-hour comedies this week follow the adventures of aspiring entertainers - Mr. Robinson on NBC is a warm, traditional sitcom about a funk musician who doubles as a high school teacher, and Hulu's Difficult People , about a pair of would-be comics, offers a sarcastic take on the Seinfeld experience. Funky with teacher Actor, stand-up comic, and singer Craig Robinson, 43, has amassed a nice following with roles in Pineapple Express , Hot Tub Machine , and This Is the End , not to mention his droll turn as warehouse foreman-turned-sports agent Darryl Philbin on The Office . The Chicago native, who has a master's degree in education, digs into his personal history to play a Chicago high school music teacher in the likable, if sometimes flat, Mr. Robinson . It premieres at 9 p.m. Wednesday on NBC. Robinson stars as Craig Robinson, a semiprofessional keyboard player and singer who plays in a band he cofounded with his brother Ben (Brandon T. Jackson)
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
"I'm not a soloist," says Suzzette Ortiz, who retires this week after teaching vocal music in Camden's public schools for 27 years. "I do harmony. " That's an apt, if incomplete, description of what Ortiz has done for thousands of students, especially at the city's Creative Arts High School. She was there on opening day in 1999, and on Thursday, she'll close her classroom door in what is now the Creative Arts Morgan Village Academy for the last time. "This is a big chapter of my life that's closing," says Ortiz, who grew up in Puerto Rico and lives in Pennsauken.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Samuel Russell Cosby Jr., 97, of Mount Airy, an organist, schoolteacher, and choral director who blended the sounds of the human voice into a melodic tapestry, died Monday, April 27, of a heart attack at his home. A Philadelphian who grew up on Godfrey Avenue, Mr. Cosby showed an early affinity and talent for music. He attended Corinthian Baptist Church along with the rest of his family, and shortly after his graduation from Central High School at age 19 became the organist for Mount Olivet Tabernacle Baptist Church.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2015 | By Tom Wilk, For The Inquirer
With the release of Hometown Girl , her 1987 debut album, Mary Chapin Carpenter launched a career that now includes 18 top-20 country singles, five Grammy Awards, and induction into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame. Her literate blend of folk, pop, and country incorporates influences from Emmylou Harris to Eudora Welty. For Carpenter, who will perform Thursday at the Scottish Rite Auditorium in Collingswood and April 25 at McCarter Theatre in Princeton, the seeds of her success were planted in Princeton, where she spent her formative years.
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A simple suburban church with superb acoustics has become a temple of serious music in South Jersey. At Bunker Hill Presbyterian Church in Washington Township, an ambitious concert series continues Sunday with five "chamber music all-stars" performing string quintets by Mozart and Brahms, says Martha Frampton, series founder. The seventh season will conclude May 17 with "Storytelling and Folk Dances," including a Spoken Word cantata and featuring downtown New York musicians Doug Balliett and Brandon Ridenour.
NEWS
March 25, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
FYODOR BADKHEN, 17, has been part of Girard Academic Music Program for four years, but he didn't realize he would help the school win a Grammy - sort of. The South Philadelphia magnet school, known as GAMP, was one of 13 schools in the nation chosen by the GRAMMY Foundation for its Signature Schools Award and will receive $5,500. The annual award recognizes the best public high schools in music education. Eight of the 13 schools, including GAMP, received the Enterprise Award grant for schools that are economically underserved.
NEWS
December 15, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
At first it was just a rumor at the prestigious boarding school: A 15-year-old sophomore was having a sexual affair with the 25-year-old music teacher. Both denied a relationship, and administrators could prove nothing. Months later, the girl's mother found evidence of the affair, including letters from the teacher to her daughter. What happened next could offer a glimpse into the past culture at the Solebury School, now the subject of a criminal investigation, accused of tolerating sexual abuse of students or misconduct by staff over decades.
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