CollectionsMusic Therapy
IN THE NEWS

Music Therapy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | By Wendy Greenberg, Special to The Inquirer
Music therapist Jim Corriveau puts down his guitar and says goodbye to six young students at the Easter Seal Society center in Towamencin Township. Four-year-old Tylea Burrell runs over and hugs him. Kevin Bupp, 4, plants himself on Corriveau's lap. They clearly don't want him to end 40 minutes of singing, swaying and making music. What the children don't realize is that they have just practiced fine-motor skills, lengthening attention spans, memory, language acquisition, sequencing and a host of other skills often lagging in physically or mentally disabled youngsters.
NEWS
August 21, 1988 | By Mary E. Charest, Special to The Inquirer
Music "fills my heart with hope. The singing helps me clear my lungs, and it helps me communicate with other people. " Those words were said by a terminally ill, quadriplegic cancer patient just a few weeks before his death, according to music therapist Beth Kingsley Hawkins, who helped the man escape from pain during the last few weeks of his life. Hawkins and about 100 other music therapists and music enthusiasts assembled last week at Immaculata College for a five-day Institute of Music and Healing.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | By Sharon O'Neal, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sister Jean Anthony, a professor of music therapy at Immaculata College, believes the field's future is intimately connected not to musical instruments but to computers. Make that computer-generated musical instruments. Sister Jean Anthony and Rebecca T. Mercuri, director of the computer consulting firm Notable Software, have been working for the last year on ways to use cyberspace, the phenomenon of a simulated environment also known as virtual reality, with traditional music therapy techniques.
NEWS
November 5, 1995 | By Cheryl Squadrito, FOR THE INQUIRER
Creaking to a halt, the elevator opened its doors on a deserted floor of Lourdes Hall at Immaculata College, and Sister Jean Anthony Gileno stepped out. Her black Reeboks padded quietly as she passed row upon row of empty book shelves, then stopped at her destination - a plain-looking door. Peering out of her black habit, she looked first over her right shoulder, then her left, and at last unlocked the door and slipped through it. Inside was her secret Eden - her music studio.
NEWS
March 16, 1997 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
She's been called the Pied Piper, but Kathy Murphy's instrument of choice is the guitar. Her goal is not to lead the students out of this rural community, but to help them become successful students. Since September, Murphy has been teaching special-education students in the Tabernacle School District and giving them the classroom and social skills they need to succeed through music. Murphy is a music therapist, one of about 15 in Burlington, Camden and Gloucester Counties, and one of about 5,000 nationwide, according to the National Association of Music Therapy.
LIVING
November 6, 1995 | By Leah Ariniello, FOR THE INQUIRER
It is well known that upbeat tunes can inspire and that mellow melodies relax. But a growing body of research is showing that music not only affects our emotional balance, it can also create physical changes in our body chemistry. One of those chemicals is immunoglobulin A. IgA defends the body's exposed internal surfaces, such as the throat, stomach and lungs, from invading microorganisms. Inhaled air brings along a host of bacteria, but IgA stops them from assaulting body tissues.
NEWS
August 16, 1992 | By Sharon O'Neal, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sister Jean Anthony, a professor of music therapy at Immaculata College, believes the field's future is intimately connected not to musical instruments but to computers. Make that computer-generated musical instruments. Sister Jean Anthony and Rebecca T. Mercuri, director of the computer consulting firm Notable Software, have been working for the last year on ways to use cyberspace, the phenomenon of a simulated environment also known as virtual reality, with traditional music therapy techniques.
NEWS
August 28, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Zion Harvey, the indomitable, adorable 8-year-old who made history with his double hand transplant at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, went home to Baltimore on Wednesday. Until Zion's early-July surgery, no child had ever received a single hand, let alone two, because transplants require lifelong immune suppression. Zion was deemed uniquely suited because he was already taking antirejection drugs to protect the kidney he received at age 4 from his mother, Pattie Ray. His unusual medical profile was the result of a life-threatening bloodstream infection at age 2 that required amputation of his hands and feet, and ruined his kidneys.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | By Brigette ReDavid, Special to The Inquirer
While teaching piano, Barbara Grinnell saw that the music and stories her pupils were making up in their improvisational work reflected their worries and emotions. "That hooked me. I wanted to use music to develop a relationship with a child to help them through their problems," she said. Grinnell took her first job as a music therapist in the early 1970s, working with special-education children in the Philadelphia public schools. Since then, she has practiced music therapy at the Developmental Center for Autistic Children in Philadelphia, and out of her home in Wynnewood.
NEWS
May 30, 2016
On May 11, the Cancer Support Community of Greater Philadelphia hosted its 18th annual Evening in the Park fund-raiser. More than 200 attended. The group supports men, women, and children living with cancer by offering free counseling, music therapy, support groups, educational workshops, exercise classes, and specialized programs for children and teens. The event recognized outstanding individuals who have supported the cause, including Iliana Strauss, presented the Inspiration Award; Joseph Robbins, who took home the Courage Award; the Chavez-Theiss family, given the Gilda Radner Award; BP Business Solutions, which received the Community Impact Award; and Corey Langer, oncologist, honored with the Ann Silverman Award.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 30, 2016
On May 11, the Cancer Support Community of Greater Philadelphia hosted its 18th annual Evening in the Park fund-raiser. More than 200 attended. The group supports men, women, and children living with cancer by offering free counseling, music therapy, support groups, educational workshops, exercise classes, and specialized programs for children and teens. The event recognized outstanding individuals who have supported the cause, including Iliana Strauss, presented the Inspiration Award; Joseph Robbins, who took home the Courage Award; the Chavez-Theiss family, given the Gilda Radner Award; BP Business Solutions, which received the Community Impact Award; and Corey Langer, oncologist, honored with the Ann Silverman Award.
NEWS
December 14, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last week Arthur Kuck celebrated a birthday. His daughter brought ribs and cake, and trimmed his fluffy white hair. His friends sang "Happy Birthday" and gave him a round of applause. His wife squeezed his hand and said proudly, "Ninety-one. " Now, Kuck couldn't tell you about any of that. Advancing dementia has curtailed both his short-term memory and his ability to communicate. "Sentences are becoming harder, if not impossible," said his daughter, Jane Frick. "He knows, but he can't verbalize.
NEWS
August 28, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Zion Harvey, the indomitable, adorable 8-year-old who made history with his double hand transplant at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, went home to Baltimore on Wednesday. Until Zion's early-July surgery, no child had ever received a single hand, let alone two, because transplants require lifelong immune suppression. Zion was deemed uniquely suited because he was already taking antirejection drugs to protect the kidney he received at age 4 from his mother, Pattie Ray. His unusual medical profile was the result of a life-threatening bloodstream infection at age 2 that required amputation of his hands and feet, and ruined his kidneys.
NEWS
February 11, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
David E. Field was a chemical engineer and design manager, but those were not his first loves. "He always had a shop in the basement" where he made dulcimers, daughter Caroline Dillon said. "And he would come home and after work go down and work in the shop. " Mr. Field produced and sold more than 400 dulcimers, Dillon said, playing some of them with groups in South Jersey and Pennsylvania. "He made dulcimers for Judy Collins, Doc Watson," and others, some of whom "would come and play music at our home in Pitman" in the 1960s.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
  Why wait? If you're the group that oversees the Philadelphia Film Festival, the annual fall movie marathon, and you've Kickstarted and fundraised, restored and retrofitted an old Center City moviehouse, why not throw a festival there whenever you want? Why just October? No reason. And so, to show off the Roxy Theater near Rittenhouse Square, and bring to town top-tier titles whose release schedules don't jibe with the main fall program, the Philadelphia Film Society offers its first Spring Showcase - 25 films in seven days.
NEWS
December 15, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karen Mechanic, director of psychiatry at Fox Chase Cancer Center, was thinking of the patients when she contacted Temple University's music therapy program. She wondered whether it would like to use Fox Chase as a training ground. That would help bolster the integrative medicine program she was building. As the conversation continued, though, Mechanic, a violinist who attended a performing arts high school, began to wonder how music might also heal a staff beset each day by the powerful emotions that accompany cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2013 | BY MICHAEL RUSSELL, Daily News Staff Writer russelm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5713
IN 1993, in South Africa, musician Sharon Katz gathered together 150 musicians and 500 children from all ethnicities in the country and set out on a journey to promote peace and racial harmony that continues to this day. "I founded the Peace Train to be the face and voice of Nelson Mandela," she said recently of the anti-apartheid leader who became South Africa's first democratically elected president in 1994. Katz has spent the last two decades advocating for peace and nonviolence through song, first in South Africa and then across the world.
NEWS
November 23, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Music is often a refracted reflection of the world from which it came. What if that world is consciously researched - like anthropology, but with less objective distance? The validity of that process arrived in several forms in a series of premieres Saturday by the JACK Quartet at Crane Arts, and Sunday by the Network for New Music at the Ethical Society. In a season titled "Trade Winds," the always well-prepared Network unveiled the latest by Philadelphia composer Andrea Clearfield based on visits to remote parts of Tibet, where she recorded hundreds of songs and chants in danger of being lost, plus new works by other composers inspired by her field recordings.
NEWS
November 4, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Eugene Ormandy may be fidgeting in his grave. He spent 41 years in front of the Philadelphia Orchestra cultivating a lush, voluptuous standard of Rachmaninoff performances, and now guest conductor Jaap van Zweden arrives this week to conduct Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 2 with polar-opposite ideas. His past performance (with Chicago) had lean sonorities, nervous rhythms, and a conspicuous lack of emotional extravagance - all qualities that have made van Zweden a bracing breath of Dutch air among the numerous American orchestras he now conducts.
NEWS
May 4, 2008 | By Jan L. Apple FOR THE INQUIRER
For the singing duo Dichroic Glass, performing represents a love of music, a bond of friendship, a family affair, and a fight for a cause. Maureen Rush-Bogutz of Cherry Hill and Kristin King of Voorhees came together several years ago in a folk group at St. Pius X, a Catholic Church in Cherry Hill. A friendship blossomed that led in 2006 to weekly sessions at Rush-Bogutz's home - a "music therapy" of sorts. Taking turns singing lead and backup, the women intertwined Rush-Bogutz's talent on acoustic and electric guitar, bass and percussion with that of King's on keyboard and percussion.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|