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Music Videos

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1992 | By Barry Gutman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Nat King Cole, Perry Como, Bing Crosby, Judy Garland, Liberace. Not exactly names that spring to mind when you think of music videos. After all, these artists have never even been on MTV (well, except for Crosby, whose "Little Drummer Boy" duet with David Bowie is exhumed each Christmas). In fact, most of them did their best work without benefit of color TV. Nevertheless, they were an important part of television. In the '50s and early '60s, these veteran crooners, belters and musicians starred in variety series and specials - and from these, new music videos have been created.
NEWS
March 6, 1995 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lacking the nostalgic charm of a Wurlitzer bubble jukebox, but delivering basically the same type of entertainment, a new cable television service called The Box debuted on Suburban Cable TV in Delaware County Wednesday. The Box makes available about 300 pay-per-view music videos on Channel 67, ranging from country to rock to rap. "What makes this different than, say, MTV, is that it's truly interactive," said Suburban Cable TV regional marketing manager John Murawski. "People are choosing what they want to see rather than reacting to what's being offered by someone in New York.
NEWS
May 15, 2008 | By George Curry
An increasing number of people are fed up with the airing of sexually explicit, violent, degrading, stereotypical music videos on TV, especially during hours when teenagers haven't turned in for bed. Citizens are fighting back by filing complaints with the Federal Communications Commission, demonstrating in front of the homes of network executives and, more recently, targeting television sponsors. Having edited Emerge magazine, a former publication owned by Black Entertainment Television (BET)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1988 | By Hans Kellner, Special to The Inquirer
Every breath you take Every move you make Every bond you break Every step you take I'll be watching you - Sting It all comes down to his eyes. To that look. Mysterious; penetrating; soaked with seductive menace. Whether you like him or not, there's no denying that he has a look that was made for multimedia superstardom. It has smoldered beneath his bottle-blond hair since at least 1978, when his band, the Police, began its quick ascent of the American pop charts with "Roxanne.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2002 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ever since Robert L. Johnson launched Black Entertainment Television in 1980, BET has come to mean many things to the many African Americans the cable network targets. To its hundreds of thousands of viewers, BET means, as its snazzy slogan proclaims, Black Star Power. But to its many vocal critics, who decry its abundance of lecherous music videos and lack of quality programs, BET still stands for Bad Entertainment Television. Many detractors hoped that BET's sale last year to mega-media conglomerate Viacom for a staggering $3 billion would make things better.
NEWS
April 24, 2003 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The playing field began to tilt two years ago. The operators at MTV's popular countdown show TRL were being inundated with requests for Michelle Branch. Problem was, they didn't have any videos from the young Arizona singer. Her debut CD, The Spirit Room, wasn't in stores yet. So MTV called up Branch's record label, Maverick, wondering where in the world kids were seeing her clip. The answer was AOL Music. Along with Yahoo's similarly themed Web site, Launch, AOL Music has become a significant player in the music industry.
NEWS
March 1, 1992 | By ROSS K. BAKER
While sitting in a darkened movie theater here the other night watching the stars of Thelma and Louise going on their sadistic rampage through the American Southwest, I thought to myself, "What must the Swedes think of Americans? Are they able to place this pageant of violence in some larger context? Do they understand that the United States is not some continuously unfolding series of outrages, rapes, shootings, and car chases?" The answer to that question is that, among the most impressionable people in this very sophisticated country, that is precisely what they think.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1990 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
What do Living Colour, Public Enemy, a Tribe Called Quest, Ziggy Marley and the Jungle Brothers have in common? All are happening young musicians with strong notions about changing the world, and with fresh urban sounds to spark the revolution. And all have put their trust, their ideas and - to a large degree - their future into the hands of an equally fresh young brother, filmmaker Charles Stone III. At the moment, Stone is helping light a fire under Public Enemy's new single "911 Is a Joke" with a caustic, darkly comic music video on the theme of police and emergency rescue team neglect.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2001 | By Claire Furia Smith FOR THE INQUIRER
When Virgin Records America wanted to promote a song by the British pop band Blur in 1997, blasting it in arenas during National Hockey League games helped to do the job. "Song 2," in which the main vocal hook is "whoo-hoo," became a hit in the United States and continues to be known as an NHL anthem of sorts. "There are a lot of puzzle pieces to making a record successful, but that exposure to audiences all over the country was invaluable," said Kate Tews, vice president of advertising and merchandising at Virgin.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1989 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
It's one of those weeks when the biggest new video release - one of the most popular movies in recent memory - may overshadow the other new arrivals. For some of them, it's just as well. WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT (1988) (Touchstone) $22.99. 104 minutes. Bob Hoskins, Christopher Lloyd, Stubby Kaye, Joanna Cassidy. Delightfully harebrained comedy about a human private eye who solves a crime in Toontown, the Hollywood suburb in which cartoon stars live. Imagine a comic, cosmic convergence of cartoon low humor and live-action high jinks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2016 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Ajanai loves cooking and dreams of having a career as a baker. She was thrilled when she had the opportunity to visit a bakery, where she toured the facility and made chocolate chip cookies and cupcakes. In her foster home, she delights in helping to shop for groceries and assisting in the kitchen. She especially likes when Chinese food, her favorite, is on the menu. A sweet, loving 16-year-old with an appealing personality, she loves music and spends many happy hours listening to her favorite bands and watching music videos.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Steven Rea, Columnist
Can a song save your life? When John Carney's movie Begin Again - with Keira Knightley as a heartbroken balladeer and Mark Ruffalo as a career-in-crisis record exec - debuted at the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival, that was the original title. Can a Song Safe Your Life is a title that would have worked on Carney's breakthrough effort, too, the little Irish movie that could, 2007's busker romance Once . Carney just as easily could have applied the title to his latest: the buoyant, autobiographically tinged 1980s coming-of-age tale Sing Street . All three are affirmations of the power of music.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Ajanai is a sweet 15-year-old with an affinity for cooking and particularly baking, which she hopes to pursue as a career. She also loves music and spends hours listening to her favorite bands and watching music videos. Among other high-priority pastimes: joining her friends in experimenting with lip gloss and mascara, going swimming, and participating in Zumba classes. Although shy when meeting new people, she easily engages in conversation as she begins to feel comfortable with them.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Miley Cyrus, innovator Renowned artist  Miley Cyrus  will appear nude in the video for "The Milky Milky Milk," which also will feature gallons of spraying milk. I'm speechless: She's a revolutionary, a rebel, a cutting-edge gal. Murphy: No-Cosby policy Eddie Murphy's triumphant return to Saturday Night Live for the show's 40th anniversary celebration was a bit of an anticlimax: He gave a thank-you speech, not a stand-up routine at the top of the February special.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Minaj's apocalyptic rage The music world was picking up the pieces Wednesday after Nicki Minaj deployed an apocalyptic series of tweets to express her anger for not picking up a coveted MTV Video Music Award Video of the Year nomination for "Anaconda. " The 32-year-old Trinidad and Tobago native did pick up three nods, including Best Female Video and Best Hip-Hop Video, but was incensed that "Anaconda" was snubbed. She has a point. The vid got nearly 20 million hits in 24 hours after its premiere last year on Vevo.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Look out, YouTube. Move over, Vimeo. There's a new online home for music videos, a kinder, gentler website and mobile app (partly) grown and launching in Philadelphia on Wednesday. VuHaus ("view house"), as it's called, is backed by six public radio stations, including WXPN-FM, and promises a panoramic perspective on "adult alternative" music styles - from Americana to electronica, blues to rap to rock. It's opening the portal with an impressive crop of live concert streams from Wednesday through Friday from the Non-Comm (noncommercial radio)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beyoncé gets everything , OK? The multiplatform chanteuse got eight nominations, leading the human world of human beings, for the MTV Music Video Awards, announced Thursday. Best video? Check. Best choreography? Well, yeah. Best female artist? Again??? Yep. Imposing as Bey may be, she's only one nom up on veteran rap guy Eminem and controversial Aussie street-talker Iggy Azalea : Each had seven noms. Pharrell Williams got a few for the gladdening, ubiquitous ditty "Happy.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2013 | BY MICHAEL CIDONI LENNOX, Associated Press
    LOS ANGELES - He's a musician without a record label, a cardholder without any remaining credit. And the gig that supplies what he calls "food money" may now be in jeopardy. But after the events of the last week, Steve Grand said, "I would die a happy man today. "Grand's first music video, for his country-tinged rock ballad "All-American Boy," was posted on YouTube last Tuesday. By Sunday, it had exploded, attracting more than 400,000 total views - nothing for top-charting videos from big-name recording artists, but an impressive figure for one from a complete unknown whose only promotion has been Internet buzz.
NEWS
June 11, 2012 | Kevin Riordan
The rocker, actor, and postmodern media personality Andrew W.K., who calls himself "a professional party," is making a music video with a group of free-spirited filmmakers based in South Jersey. W.K. (the initials stand for Wilkes Krier) hired the Gloucester County production company From Start to Film after its representatives made a pitch to his people outside W.K.'s March concert at the TLA theater in Philly. The video will promote what the 33-year-old cult star dubs a "deluxe" 10th-anniversary rerelease of his I Get Wet album and may be released as soon as next month.
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By Matt Sedensky, Associated Press
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - Davy Jones, 66, the leading heartthrob of the much-loved pre-fab 1960s rock band the Monkees, who sang many of the made-for-TV act's biggest hits, including "Daydream Believer," died Wednesday in Florida. Mr. Jones died of a massive heart attack in Indiantown, Fla., where he lived, his publicist Helen Kensick said. Detectives with the Martin County Sheriff's Criminal Investigations Division were conducting a death investigation, but said foul play was not suspected.
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