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NEWS
October 28, 2002 | By C. Tenaya Brown
Recently, my seventh-grade daughter came home from school and told me about an exchange she'd had with another student we'll call "Shaina," who called my daughter a "retart. " Quick-witted as she is, my daughter responded: "It's retard, you retard. " Perhaps embarrassed by her mispronunciation of the word, Shaina criticized my daughter as being "too perfect," and added, "I bet you don't even listen to rap. " Actually, my daughter does listen to rap, and she watches music videos, too. The difference is that my daughter acknowledges that what she sees and hears on TV or the radio is pure entertainment and not behavior to be emulated.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2002 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ever since Robert L. Johnson launched Black Entertainment Television in 1980, BET has come to mean many things to the many African Americans the cable network targets. To its hundreds of thousands of viewers, BET means, as its snazzy slogan proclaims, Black Star Power. But to its many vocal critics, who decry its abundance of lecherous music videos and lack of quality programs, BET still stands for Bad Entertainment Television. Many detractors hoped that BET's sale last year to mega-media conglomerate Viacom for a staggering $3 billion would make things better.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Glitter, the eagerly awaited, twice-postponed A Star Is Born revamp featuring Mariah Carey in her film debut, is so bad that you can write its epitaph. A star is stillborn. It's not entirely a failure of the story. This yarn about a backup singer who soars to the top while her famous discoverer and lover watches his career plummet has always worked before, for Janet Gaynor and, spectacularly, for Judy Garland and Barbra Streisand. It's not entirely a failure of direction.
NEWS
August 5, 2001 | By Trish Boppert
Was it really 20 years ago this week that MTV aired its first music video, appropriately titled "Video Killed the Radio Star"? Don't ask me. I didn't "go on the cable," as a neighbor quaintly put it, until 1996. How did I live sans 6 billion channels of programming? Pretty well, thank you, as did many Philadelphians in a city not completely wired for cable access in the years following MTV's launch. Maternity leave, when my daughter's sleeping habits seemingly revolved around the magnetic pull of Jupiter, was trial by VHF. I soaked up lot of syndicated drek and projectile-vomited baby formula in those no-man's hours between 2 and 6 a.m. Under sleep-deprived duress, even reruns of Hogan's Heroes develop a certain twisted charm.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2001 | By Claire Furia Smith FOR THE INQUIRER
When Virgin Records America wanted to promote a song by the British pop band Blur in 1997, blasting it in arenas during National Hockey League games helped to do the job. "Song 2," in which the main vocal hook is "whoo-hoo," became a hit in the United States and continues to be known as an NHL anthem of sorts. "There are a lot of puzzle pieces to making a record successful, but that exposure to audiences all over the country was invaluable," said Kate Tews, vice president of advertising and merchandising at Virgin.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Genre-bending is an honorable practice that occasionally yields a pleasant surprise such as Naked Gun, a detective slapstick, or Pennies From Heaven, a musical melodrama. One Night at McCool's, a curious screwball noir, doesn't so much bend established genres as blend them into an unappetizing cocktail, where they curdle before pouring. More or less a Femme Fatale Attraction, the film stars Liv Tyler as Jewel, a ruby-lipped seductress falling out of her red velvet mini-dress and into the lives of bartender Randy (Matt Dillon)
NEWS
February 10, 2001 | By Matthew P. Blanchard and Lee Drutman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When it came to light this week that a Neshaminy High School girl had videotaped two classmates having sex in the auditorium - and proudly showed the tape in school the following day - parents and teachers were aghast. Students, however, were barely atwitter. "I guess they were trying to express themselves," said senior Lauren Moore. "People were shocked, but really it was nothing big. " After all, Neshaminy is the school where shock-jock Howard Stern himself spoke on the loudspeaker last year to endorse the winning candidate for student body president.
NEWS
December 15, 2000 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
'N Sync is on holiday hiatus. Steely Dan's dynamic duo are probably sunning themselves in Maui. The Eurythmics' brief reunion tour came and went with only a couple U.S. dates. Carlos Santana ain't ever gonna tour with all the guest talents who recorded on his hit comeback album. But if you want to delight a music fan this holiday season, give them a magic wand to summon up the sounds and sights of these artists (and others) performing on VHS videotape or DVD videodisc. Music fans can't help but connect better with the DVD versions.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1999 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We've all heard the dirt on Comedy Central's The Man Show, USA Network's Happy Hour, and The X Show on FX, the current spate of dirt-cheap variety-show- style cable programs that glory in booze, babes, third-tier celebrities, and jokes about bodily emissions. Critics hold their noses. Fans - or at least the rowdies recruited for the live studio audiences - seem to revel in the shows' in- your-face political incorrectness, and the bevy of gyrating, rump- shaking, bikini-wearing dancers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1999 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Befitting her status as a Kosovar pop star, Eleonora Jakupi lives in one of Albania's finer apartment buildings. In poor Tirana, though, this means only that the steps inside her building are uncracked, the railings are in one piece, and the small elevator is still working. If it were not for the Kosovo crisis, the beautiful, dark-eyed Jakupi might be singing a different tune. But war touches all here, from the oldest rural peasants to the most high-spirited urban youths. Today, like hundreds of thousands of other Kosovo residents now seeking refuge in this impoverished land, Jakupi finds herself longing for a home she may never see again.
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