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NEWS
October 15, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BACK IN the 1980s, City Hall workers and others in the vicinity could take their lunches to the nearby Arch Street Presbyterian Church and listen to Esther Wideman at the organ. The once-a-week noon concerts were free and part of Esther's contribution to the cultural life of her adopted city. She was the organist and director of music at the church. Esther's passion for the organ took her all over Europe, where she could listen to the music of famous organs, mostly in ancient churches, and get to play many of them herself.
SPORTS
October 3, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
WHEN WE first heard Stephon Marbury was starring in a musical in China titled "I Am Marbury," we briefly morphed into Tom McGinnis and let go with a lusty, "Are you kidding me?" The 37-year-old Marbury, it seems, is a megastar in China. Bigger than Jerry Lewis in France or David Hasselhoff in Germany. Heck, there's even a statue of the two-time NBA All-Star outside the MasterCard Center in Beijing where he led the Ducks to the Chinese Basketball Association title in March. The musical, which opened last night in Beijing and runs 11 days, is sold out for the first three shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The classical music world is full of stories about great musicians suffering heart attacks in mid-performance but soldiering on because the repertoire was so great they didn't want to stop. Nothing of that sort was going to happen Sunday at First Unitarian Church of Philadelphia when Richard Reed Parry, best known as a member of the Arcade Fire collective, arrived on a tour supporting his first solo album, Music for Heart and Breath . Released by the classical label Deutsche Grammophon, the disc (or discs if purchased on LP set)
NEWS
September 28, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Next month, Forbes magazine is putting on its first Under 30 Summit in Philadelphia, a confab aimed at young tech entrepreneurs. The event runs Oct. 19 to 22. It aims to be a sort of mini-SXSW, with panel discussions, interview sessions, and Shark Tank -style competitions all day long at the Convention Center Oct. 20 and 21. All manner of boldface names will be in town: Tinder cofounder Sean Rad; Shake Shack restaurateur Danny Meyer; America...
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
'No more of this breaking down music into all these different kinds," says super-mandolinist Chris Thile. "There's just . . . music. " Maybe "just music" is a good name for the captivating alt-jazz-bluegrass-classical on Thile's new album with super-double-bassist Edgar Meyer. Titled just Bass & Mandolin (Nonesuch)****, it's the first Thile/Meyer since 2008, and it fronts their current tour. The closest they'll get to Philly this time around is an Oct. 9 show at Richardson Auditorium in Princeton.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON - Meryl Streep, the Takacs Quartet, and Philip Roth aren't names likely to be seen together, much less people found in the same concert hall. Yet Princeton University Concerts presented all three in Richardson Auditorium on Friday evening, with the quartet playing Arvo Pärt and Franz Schubert, Streep reading extensively from the 2006 novel Everyman , and its author, Roth, listening in the audience - in a one-time-only event that guaranteed a packed house. Interdisciplinary events are a priority for Princeton University Concerts, this one building on a similar Takacs program presented at Carnegie Hall in 2007, with Philip Seymour Hoffman reading Roth's accounts of how everyday people decline, die, are grieved and remembered.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Jeff Tweedy has made a lot of records, but the front man for the esteemed American rock band Wilco (and before that, coleader of alt-country outfit Uncle Tupelo) has never put out an honest-to-goodness solo album. That will still be true come Tuesday, when Sukierae (dBpm ), the 20-song set credited to Tweedy (no Jeff), will be released. That's because although Tweedy performed almost all of the music himself, another family member also played a key role. Spencer Tweedy, his 18-year-old son, played drums on the double disc - as he will Sunday night, when Tweedy, the band, headlines the Merriam Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The great Gothic monsters of 19th-century literature elude convincing musical treatment, probably because these semi-folkloric creatures lose their bite and mystery when baring their souls in music. Wisely, the Philadelphia Opera Collective veered away from direct dramatization of the monster at hand in By You That Made Me, Frankenstein , characterizing the circumstances behind the famous Mary Shelley novel. Seen on Saturday in the thick of the current Fringe Festival, this 90-minute, two-act opera of sorts was presented in the second-floor parlor of the cozy 19th-century-ish Benjamin Franklin Club, in something close to a site-specific performance.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Does anyone actually buy music anymore? Unclear. But the album release schedule still gets busy after Labor Day. Besides those blurbed below, look for releases by Chris Brown ( X , Sept. 16) Lucinda Williams (the double album Down Where the Spirit Meets the Bone , Sept. 30), Weezer ( Everything Will Be Alright in the End , Oct. 7), Florida Georgia Line ( Anything Goes , Oct. 14), Jessie Ware ( Tough Love , Oct. 21), Lil Wayne ( Tha Carter V , Oct. 28), Foo Fighters ( Sonic Highways , Nov. 10)
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Brielle Urciuoli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Less than a year ago, the former post office on Collingswood's Lincoln Avenue was an eyesore. It had been vacant for a decade and was becoming increasingly dilapidated. Now, it is the chic new home of Collingswood Music, another business contributing to the evolving hip personality of the town. "It's probably one of the last buildings in the area that hasn't been worked with," business owner Ted Velykis said. Some work remains, including putting up a sign. The borough lost a great deal of business to Cherry Hill Mall in the 1960s, and by the 1990s, Haddon Avenue was laced with vacant storefronts.
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