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ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2016 | By Drew Lazor, For The Inquirer
There's an early scene in Jeremy Saulnier's arresting new thriller Green Room that's so punk rock it hurts. The Ain't Rights, a young, noisy band touring the Pacific Northwest, are sitting for an interview with a mohawked music journalist. He leads by asking why the group is so hard to track down online. "The music is shared live," Pat (Anton Yelchin), the bass player, replies with a slight holier-than-thou edge. "It's time and aggression, and then it's over. You got to be there.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2016 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
As the owner of Chris' Jazz Cafe for the last 15 years of the club's 25-year history, Mark DeNinno looks back fondly at the young musicians who got their start on the stage at Chris' and went on to become jazz superstars - names like guitarist Kurt Rosenwinkel and drummer Ari Hoenig. In his other role as chef, DeNinno's memories also extend to the meals he's made them. For Hoenig's regular returns to the club, DeNinno says, it's always crab cakes, unless crawfish are in season. Pianist Helen Sung loves lamb Bolognese.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Legendary bassist and sartorial maven Jamaaladeen Tacuma has forever hung at the busy intersection of magic-making avant-garde jazz and experimental fusion-funk. The Southwest Philadelphia native, by age 19, was playing in Ornette Coleman's Prime Time (recording free classics such as 1977's Dancing in Your Head and 1978's Body Meta ), and angular guitarist James Blood Ulmer's torrid Tales of Captain Black in 1978. If Tacuma had stopped there, he would have cemented his avant-jazz cred, but this is also a gentleman who once held down the groove for Philadelphia organist Charles Earland and earlier this month was part of the Jazz Foundation of America's 25th anniversary Loft Party in Manhattan, keeping hard, funky time with trombonist Craig Harris and playing David Bowie songs.
NEWS
April 25, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
As jobs go, there's not much to recommend it. The work is hard, there's no glory, and the risk of disaster is high. Regarding any levity, only the paycheck might draw a laugh. And yet, page-turners are classical music's anonymous heroes. In some performances, a smart music reader with quick reflexes and intuition for nailing just the right moment for turning the page can be the difference between a performance fraught with gremlins and one that soars. Page-turners are the air-traffic controllers of music, says Miles Cohen, artistic director of the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, perhaps the area's most frequent professional employer of page-turners.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
Bernie Sanders wasn't among the announced headliners at the Coachella music festival that's taken place over the last two weekends in the Southern California desert, but the candidate for the Democratic Party nomination for president was at the oversize gathering in more than just spirit. During a headlining set by Grimes, the Canadian DJ/producer born Claire Boucher, who plays the Electric Factory on June 3, a giant drawing of the senator from Vermont was projected on a video screen . And in a prerecorded message, Sanders introduced Run the Jewels, the acclaimed rap duo of El-P and Killer Mike, the latter of whom has been among the most outspoken of a long list of indie rockers and rappers who have not been shy about declaring how intensely they #FeelTheBern.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Borromeo String Quartet violinist Nicholas Kitchen expands on his thoughts about the intersection of classical music and emerging technology. Do you think it is inevitable that printed music will go away or perhaps become a quaint old rarity?   Let me consider a slightly different question as a prelude to answering the main question: What are the benefits reading music from PDF files instead of paper? Let's just consider that basically most everyone on earth has or is trying to get a computer, tablet, or smartphone, as well as access to the internet.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
It's OK to show up at a Philadelphia Orchestra concert this season and feel conflicted that big plans never materialized. The Stravinsky Soldier's Tale in a staged version by James Alexander, announced for the current run of concerts, was a victim of this season's budget cuts, and so the program was reworked without actors and dancers. The orchestra's current leadership feels that visuals are a good way to lure more listeners to the sound. Maybe. And though the orchestra has staged The Soldier's Tale before - in an elegant 2006 family-concert production by director Susan Fenichell - it was tantalizing to consider what Alexander (who has staged the St. Matthew Passion here)
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin and Samantha Melamed, CLASSICAL MUSIC AND BEER CRITICS
S teuart and Michelle Pincombe are spending a year living in a trailer, traveling through the United States and Canada, spreading the word about the power classical music can have in surprising places. Tuesday night the couple stopped at Dock Street Brewery at 50th and Baltimore Streets, where Steuart played Baroque cello while an attentive standing-room-only crowd quenched its thirst for Bach and beer chosen to somehow match each other. Our critics weigh in on the evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Milton Babbitt (1916-2011) is one of the most infamously experimental American composers of the 20th century - but he hasn't exactly been a magnet for posthumous idolization. So Network for New Music seemed admirably fearless with a Sunday concert titled "All the Things He Was," showing why some consider the Philadelphia-born composer deeply misunderstood. With his thick black glasses and slightly smug smile, the über-modernist Babbitt seemed to treat music like mathematical rocket science.
NEWS
April 20, 2016 | By Shaun Brady, For the Daily News
It certainly didn't feel as though summer was drawing to a close as a sweat-soaked crowd gathered on Labor Day weekend under a blazing sun on Detroit's Hart Plaza to witness the first performance of guitar great Pat Metheny and famed bassist Ron Carter. When I mentioned to Carter I'd been fortunate enough to attend that Detroit Jazz Festival concert, giving me some idea of what to expect from the pair's reunion set for this weekend at the Exit Zero Jazz Festival in Cape May, he responded with a single word: "Surprise!"
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