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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2016
Theater A Moon for the Misbegotten 2 lost souls find solace with one another on a Connecticut farm. Closes 2/7. Walnut Street Theatre - Independence Studio on 3, 825 Walnut St.; 215-574-3550.   $30-$35. Annie Wilson: Lovertits Human sexuality as presented by society vs. how it is in reality. Closes 1/30. Bryn Mawr College - Goodhart Hall, 101 N. Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr; 610-526-5210.   $20; $18 seniors; $10 students with ID; $5 children under 12. Assassins, NJ The Sondheim musical, a chilling comedy, stars Barrymore Award winner Jeffrey Coons.
NEWS
January 21, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
The pianist arrives as the food court clock strikes noon. A jazz man at heart, the pianist exudes class. In his sweater vest and tie, Mark Randall sits down at his Baldwin, his sweet, battered Baldwin, nestled among the marble tables and plastic ferns, under the neon lights of the China Pagoda restaurant and the Hair Express salon. He begins to play. A standard, always. Porter. Gershwin. Jimmy Dorsey, perhaps. Some barely notice Randall as they pass through the old Lit Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, STAFF MUSIC CRITIC
Eighth Blackbird has so decisively changed the new-music landscape that the least listeners can do is meet the group more than halfway at each Philadelphia reappearance. That attitude was needed at its Philadelphia Chamber Music Society concert on Friday at the Kimmel Center. Titled Hand Eye , the program was a series of new pieces inspired, Pictures at an Exhibition -style, by artworks in the Detroit collection of Maxine and Stuart Frankel. The composers came from a collective known as Sleeping Giant, and conspired to make the program feel like a suite, with pieces eliding into each other, forcing you to give up on the usual left-brain anchors of always knowing what piece was being played.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, STAFF MUSIC CRITIC
Some programs in the Philadelphia Orchestra's three-week Music of Vienna Festival could have happened anywhere in the season. But Wednesday night's program at the Kimmel Center was much more adventurous than that. With engaging recklessness, the concert was designed to show Vienna as a center for music both great and silly. Music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin's program was bookended by waltz king Johann Strauss, with Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 4 and two piggyback works: Gustav Mahler's orchestral transcription of Beethoven's String Quartet No. 11 Op. 95 ("Serioso")
NEWS
January 13, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Turn and face the strange. Defy the status quo. And market, market, market yourself all the way to death's door. David Bowie did all that, constantly laughing at convention, and (sometimes) all the way to the bank. A great influence in music and fashion, he carried equal weight as a financial innovator. He was an art and business project forever in flux. Ziggy had a zig for every zag. In the early 1970s, he answered social consciousness with androgyny. Later, when it was hip to diss disco, he embraced it. Even rock bastions like WMMR, WIOQ, and WYSP were forced to play "Young Americans.
TRAVEL
December 27, 2015
Drifting asleep to music without disturbing your bedmate or seatmate is as simple as wearing headphones, right? It is until you turn over on your side and the earpieces get smashed into your ears, a not-so-slumber-friendly feeling. The tech world has come up with Bedphones, now in their comfier third generation of featherweight, 1/4-inch-thick foam-covered headphones that you can barely feel that and lie flat against your ears, even when you roll over. Integrated ultra-thin, rubber-coated, flexible-wire ear hooks unobtrusively help fine-tune the fit. The attached 49-inch-long audio cable has an aluminum 31/2 mm jack that fits any standard headphone port.
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