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Musical History

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NEWS
June 28, 2005 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Onstage at The Fantasticks at the Walnut Street Theatre's Independence Studio, there's musical history on the periphery: harpist Walter Pfeil. Soon to turn 80, the trim, dapper, bearded Pfeil performed with the original cast of the forever-running musical 45 years ago at the Sullivan Street Playhouse in New York's Greenwich Village. Pfeil was only a temporary replacement during the original harpist's vacation in 1960. But he wasn't an anonymous pit musician; this chamber-size musical makes the harp a key part of the show's atmosphere and is as visible as the onstage characters.
NEWS
April 3, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
WILMINGTON - One gray afternoon last week, a mural depicting four musicians with connections to Delaware's principal city - trumpeter Clifford Brown, guitarist David Bromberg, reggae icon Bob Marley, and bandleader Cab Calloway - urged Wilmingtonians to "celebrate the music and soul of our city. " Amid the Market Street mix of tech-company start-ups and shut-down storefronts, hopeful clothing boutiques and pawnshops, there weren't enough pedestrians to initiate even the most meager of celebrations.
NEWS
July 31, 2003
READING your article on Smith Playground brought me to tears. As a child we went to the playground weekly - and it was a fun place to go for free. We had my sister's birthday parties there for seven years straight. My father played there as a child. The city wants to build a new playground, but we don't need a new one. Donate to the one that has been in Philadelphia for over a century. We can start by helping raise the money to save Smith Playground and discuss proper investment strategies for the future so that this will not happen when my children want to take their children there.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2005 | New York Daily News
The Hit Factory - the famed Manhattan music studio where John Lennon spent his last hours, Bruce Springsteen laid down tracks for "Born in the U.S.A.," and Whitney Houston hit her highest notes - is shutting its doors. Doomed by the digital revolution, the rock 'n' roll temple's owners said this week they will move their West 54th Street headquarters to a smaller facility in Miami within a month. Music producer Jerry Ragovoy opened the studio on West 48th Street in 1968, initially as a place in the city where his own artists could record.
NEWS
January 11, 1999 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alda Florence Poindexter, 95, a prominent accompanist and music teacher, died after a brief illness Saturday at Presbyterian Medical Center. Mrs. Poindexter was the mother of veteran KYW-TV journalist Malcolm Poindexter Jr. Born in Southwest Philadelphia, Mrs. Poindexter taught piano and accompanied major choral organizations such as the Loreleis, the Little Opera Guild, the Choristers, the Poindexter Singers, and the Philadelphia Male Chorus....
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2000 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Afro-Cuban folklore, music and religion is full of the veneration - and, sometimes, parody - of elders. So when 92-year-old Havana musician Compay Segundo suddenly hunched over to transform himself from dignified, courtly performer into exaggeratedly frail old man while singing religious songs of Yoruba and Nanigo origin, the device resonated on several levels. Compay, who sang and played his modified guitar, the armonico, for 90 minutes at the Mann Music Center Wednesday night, made a deep connection by adopting the negro viejo persona.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The boys choir of Leipzig's St. Thomas Church - Bach's church - continued its first American tour Sunday with a program reflecting its deep immersion in its own musical history. Singing on Sunday for an overflow audience at the Church of the Holy Trinity in Rittenhouse Square, the ensemble offered Bach and Mendelssohn, but sang two pieces by contemporary composers, as well. This choir comprises boys who live and study at the church's school, devoting full time to music and singing.
NEWS
September 17, 2003 | DEBBIE WOODELL
RED. That's the first color I think of when I think of the Man in Black. Red was the color of the Columbia Records labels on my grandparents' Johnny Cash records. You might wonder what a lesbian who was born and raised in South Jersey has to do with Johnny Cash, the country music superstar who died Friday at 71. Well, my story probably is like that of a lot of kids who lived through the '60s, gay and straight. Growing up, my brother and I often slept over at my grandparents' while my parents went off and did whatever parents do when the kids aren't around.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1986 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bobby Scott is not a name the masses will instantly recognize, yet just about everyone has heard the music he has been associated with over the years. Remember a song called "Chain Gang"? That's a tough one, since it goes back about 30 years, but it happened to be a hit record for Scott. Then there was the song "A Taste of Honey. " Martin Denny's orchestra won a Grammy with it as best instrumental theme of 1962, and three years later, Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass won three more Grammys, including one for record of the year.
FOOD
August 3, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
In the old, tranquil Andy Hardy films, way before the blood-surging palpitations that accompany such films as Jaws I and II, Mickey Rooney would smile, exposing lots of wholesome white teeth, and say something nonchalant like: "Hey, gang, let's put on a show. " What followed would become musical history. In those good old days, Rooney and the gang could whip up a spectacular worthy of Broadway as easily as real kids could drink lemonade on a hot, muggy day. They did it in practically every other film in the series, didn't they?
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BUSINESS
March 15, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Introduced as interior designer for the 152-room SLS LUX Philadelphia Hotel, the iconic Phillipe Starck found it easy to strike the right chord with his audience of city movers and shakers. Turning to Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff, the Frenchman thanked the recording impresarios for giving him "the kind of music that has allowed me to make good projects. " "This is my opportunity," Starck said of his first Philadelphia project, "to be able to pay my debt to you and your music," to which he listens as he designs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
The songs that fl├╝gelhornist Hugh Masekela and singer-guitarist Vusi Mahlasela performed at the Annenberg Center on Saturday night were the sound track to the apartheid era, and thus dealt with grim themes: racial segregation, violence, imprisonment, and struggle. But the mood these two South African icons conjured was buoyant and celebratory, a vivid illustration of the role music played in lifting the spirits of South Africans during decades of oppression. The lighthearted mood could be summed up in Mahlasela's gallows humor, as he introduced a "very short song" called "Jailbreak," written by a friend during his prison term - then proceeded to scrape the strings of his guitar to simulate a sawing sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Anyone looking for a quick overview of jazz history could take a crash course simply by checking out a few performances in Philly this weekend. Around the city, modern jazz artists are paying homage to a groundbreaking festival and some of the music's most pioneering artists, glancing back while moving determinedly forward. Saturday night at the Painted Bride Art Center, Philadelphia saxophonist and bandleader Bobby Zankel kicks off his three-night "Still the New Thing" festival with a concert celebrating his mentor, Cecil Taylor.
FOOD
December 12, 2012 | By Emily Babay, Philly.com Staff Writer
Diners at the renovated Hard Rock Cafe in Center City can now get more of a taste of Philadelphia music history with their meals. In the new Philadelphia Room, patrons might sit beneath a shredded leather outfit worn by Philadelphia native Lisa "Left Eye" Lopes, the late TLC singer-songwriter, or handwritten lyrics to "I Hate Myself for Loving You" by Joan Jett, who grew up in Wynnewood. Plaques describe each item and the artist's connection to the Philadelphia area. "Philadelphia is such a rock-and-roll town," Hard Rock historian Jeff Nolan said during a morning tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2012
In celebration of the bat mitzvah's 90th anniversary this year, we asked readers for their memories, and we got a heap. We heard from women ranging in age from 88 to 14, with bat mitzvahs dating from 1953 to 2011. Some were funny, others poignant, a few regretful, many joyful. To all our readers who shared, thank you (and mazel tov!) Back in 1970, girls were relegated to second-class status. We conducted the Friday night service, but there was no Saturday Torah reading for us. That was OK, but I was exceedingly jealous of my male counterparts who got lavish Saturday evening parties - with live bands!
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2011 | By CHRIS CAROLA, Associated Press
LAKE GEORGE, N.Y. - Robert Flacke Sr. can remember the days when Fort William Henry's multimedia exhibit consisted of two Kodak carousel-style color slide projectors that kept breaking down. The history-heavy tourist attraction on the southern end of Lake George upgraded years ago to a video display, an improvement that looks positively futuristic amid all the aging, dusty exhibits sprinkled throughout the privately owned reconstructed French and Indian War fort and museum. Many of the displays look like they haven't changed since the place was built more than a half-century ago. To boost numbers of visitors, museum and historical sites around the country are searching for new ways to update old exhibits amid a time of economic uncertainty and declining support for museums in general and history museums in particular.
NEWS
April 3, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
WILMINGTON - One gray afternoon last week, a mural depicting four musicians with connections to Delaware's principal city - trumpeter Clifford Brown, guitarist David Bromberg, reggae icon Bob Marley, and bandleader Cab Calloway - urged Wilmingtonians to "celebrate the music and soul of our city. " Amid the Market Street mix of tech-company start-ups and shut-down storefronts, hopeful clothing boutiques and pawnshops, there weren't enough pedestrians to initiate even the most meager of celebrations.
NEWS
April 27, 2010 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In Philadelphia, music lovers have almost total recall of the city's proud history. They talk about Stokowski's children's concerts as if they happened yesterday, or rattle off the repertoire of North Broad Street's Metropolitan Opera House in the 1920s. The city has another musical history, though, a parallel tale of triumphs that has remained largely obscured, at least to much of the white classical music establishment. Philadelphia was home to impresario and civic leader Samuel London Evans, who brought violinist Itzhak Perlman, soprano/mezzo Grace Bumbry, and mime Marcel Marceau to audiences here and around the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2010 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the Philadelphia Flower Show, the crowd is snaking along the pathway through the Irish garden display, their eyes intently raking the underbrush as if engaged in an Easter egg hunt for adults. In a corner of the exhibit's colonnaded courtyard, largely unnoticed, Moya Brennan is singing a haunting rendition of "Down by the Salley Gardens," accompanied by a harpist and a fiddler. That she is drawing so little attention is remarkable. Imagine stumbling across Aretha Franklin singing "(You Make Me Feel Like)
NEWS
July 2, 2008 | By Dan Lieberman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some of the city's music luminaries were at Philadelphia International Airport's A-East terminal yesterday morning to unveil an exhibit that spotlights 44 of the artists in Philadelphia's Walk of Fame. The exhibition, produced by the airport's Exhibitions Program and sponsored by Sunoco Welcome America, presents 44 black-and-white photographs of Walk of Fame inductees. Titled "Philadelphia's Music Legends: Selected Artists on the Walk of Fame," the exhibition gives travelers a chance to learn about the city's rich music history.
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