CollectionsMusical Instruments
IN THE NEWS

Musical Instruments

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 1, 1986 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
To anyone with even a modest knowledge of fine musical instruments, the idea of buying one - or worse, of selling one - at a country auction must seem incongruous. Thursday's sale at the Skippack Firehouse of 31 violins and violas, at least one purportedly of 18th-century European origin, did little to suggest otherwise. The prices were low and so skewed that the top bid of the session, $450, was for one of the 119 bows also offered by the auction company, Sanford A. Alderfer Inc. And while the prices could hardly have overjoyed the seller, the buyers also faced buying what in effect was a musical pig in a poke.
LIVING
January 6, 2006 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Barry Slosberg Inc. will strike up the 2006 edition of its annual New Year's sale of musical instruments beginning at 10 a.m. Jan. 15 at its gallery in Port Richmond. Roughly 330 lots will be offered, and about 90 percent of the instruments originally came from the estate of the DeSimones, a family of South Philadelphia musicians, Slosberg said this week. He called the auction "our largest musical-instrument sale ever. " Strings make up the largest category of instruments in the auction: There are more than 50 19th- and 20th-century violins and cellos, as well as banjos and electric and acoustic guitars.
NEWS
November 18, 1997 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Applause from a school band concert was just starting to fade away when audience member Sharon Parker began to think about the students who were not on stage. Parker, curriculum director for the Wallingford-Swarthmore School District, said that a few days later. she asked a child who was not in the concert what the reason was. The answer, Parker said, was financial. "That child told me that their family could not afford to lease an instrument. The mother of the family was concerned about paying for any repairs that might arise," Parker said.
NEWS
February 9, 1999 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
You're a good parent, right? You want your kid to have all kinds of life experiences, and be a well-rounded individual with an appreciation for the arts. So when he runs home asking if he can take saxophone lessons like his friend Grover down the street, you're more than happy to saddle up the checkbook and ride off to the nearest music store, right? Well . . . maybe not. First of all, you're looking at a starting price tag of $850 to $900 for a sax in the "good quality" range.
NEWS
May 9, 1999 | By Candace Heckman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When it comes to buying musical instruments, used can be better, particularly if it's at half the price. Music Go Round, a national chain store specializing in used musical instruments, has opened a shop in Washington Township. The local owner, Don Seiple, enthusiastic about breaking into this lucrative market, is certain that a ringing cash register will be music to his ears. Currently, Music Go Round's biggest sellers are guitars, acoustic and electric, Seiple said.
NEWS
January 26, 2002 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Between the jingle of gold coins and the gentler tones of musical instruments, Barry Slosberg's gallery in Port Richmond will be a scene of harmonic convergence tomorrow. Here are some of the objects of note that will be offered beginning at 10 a.m. The gold coins, more than 40 lots of them, were consigned by the District Attorney's Office, which seized them several years ago. Most conspicuous is a necklace with a strand of fifteen $20 gold Eagles. It should sell for $2,000 to $2,500, according to Slosberg associate Eric Cohen.
NEWS
March 10, 1994 | By Ilene R. Prusher, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It would be good fodder for David Letterman if his show featured stupid crime tricks. Not the violent strain of crime that makes the skin crawl, but the absurd type of lawbreaking that elicits raised eyebrows, if not an occasional snicker. And while the recent thefts of enough musical instruments to start a combo and of a flock of cow-shaped clocks are treated seriously by police, some are wondering whether a bizarre crime wave is in the process of sweeping the area. "It seemed a little strange," West Goshen Police Chief Mike Carroll said of the weekend theft of 1,600 pink and black bovine clocks from a warehouse operated by Intermediate Marketing.
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | MICHAEL PLUNKETT / Inquirer Suburban Staff
An opening-night gala took place last night at the new Washington Township Center for the Performing Arts, with 600 schoolchildren singing, dancing, and playing musical instruments. The 2,500-seat auditorium opened Sept. 1, but this was the first school performance.
NEWS
December 6, 2011
Play On, Philly! is seeking donations of musical instruments - strings, brass, woodwinds, percussion are all welcome. In addition, the program is in need of other kinds of equipment, such as reeds, strings, and mouthpieces. Donations are tax-deductible. Information: 215-531-4876, Play On, Philly! In Concert Students from Play On, Philly! perform in a free holiday concert Saturday at 2 p.m. with conductor Rossen Milanov (Curtis, '94), St. Francis de Sales School, 917 S. 47th St. 215-531-4876, 'El Sistema USA!
NEWS
August 2, 1989 | Inquirer photographs by Greg Lanier
Music is the means Karen Moses uses to bridge the generation gap between members of the Golden Slipper Club of Uptown Home for the Aged and youngsters who attend a weekly program at the Northeast Regional Library at Cottman Avenue and Oakland Street. Moses is the director of recreation and the music therapist at Uptown. Each Thursday morning from 10:30 to 11, she and a contingent of senior citizens visit the library to put on an intergenerational program for their young audience. They take along musical instruments for the children to play, and they keep their voices in tune during sing-alongs with the youngsters, which Moses leads with her guitar.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BACK IN THE early '60s, Mike "Teardrops" Silenzio needed a lead singer for the doo-wop group he was putting together. Mike attended South Philadelphia High School and he was chums with Fabian Forte, Chubby Checker, Bobby Rydell and other kids who would go on to stellar singing careers, and he knew what he was looking for. His group, the Masters, consisted of Mike himself as second tenor, baritone Rich Finizio, his cousin Frank "Tweetie" Condo...
NEWS
May 1, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Steve Weiss, 71, a rare-instrument lover who owned one of the country's largest percussion retail businesses in Willow Grove and rented instruments to both orchestra players and David Bowie's backup band, died Monday, April 21, at Abington Memorial Hospital of heart failure related to prostate cancer. Mr. Weiss grew up in Logan and graduated from Olney High School. His first drum lesson was at the age of 10, and he went on to play the instrument in bands, including in a Polka group, before starting his business.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
One thing about Once   : It's not the movie. It's the international touring show budded off from the Broadway show budded off, in turn, from the movie. Starring Irish musician Glen Hansard and Czech musician Markéta Irglová, Once was a dark-horse smash in 2007, earning two Grammys and an Oscar. Persuasive, passionate, it's a busker's love story. But Once in Philadelphia (Academy of Music, through Nov. 10) is different. Sure, it has the guitar-playing Guy and the pianist Girl, plus Hansard and Irglová's poignant songs.
NEWS
June 29, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a third-year doctoral student in chemistry confided that she planned to quit school in favor of her first love - the cello - Hai-Lung Dai advised her against it. "If you pursue music, you have to be at the very top to really support your interest," Dai, then chair of the chemistry department at the University of Pennsylvania, recalled telling the young woman, one of his best students. Finish the degree and pursue music on the side, he told her. That's what he did, and he couldn't be happier.
TRAVEL
June 3, 2013 | By Myscha Theriault, McCLATCHY-TRIBUNE SERVICE
Adorning the mountains of North Carolina with a hip urban vibe, noteworthy art scene, and a growing circuit of artisan microbreweries is the city of Asheville. Phenomenal food and well-preserved historical buildings are also part of the travel itinerary for this destination. Here's how to make the most of your vacation dollars while visiting. Appetites Favor a big breakfast? The Corner Kitchen ( www.thecornerkitchen.com ) offers a variety of hearty options such as $5 biscuits and gravy and $2 grits.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Thursday at the Merriam Theater, Sweet Honey in the Rock will be bringing it - and then some. "We have everything," says longtime (and retiring) member Ysaye Maria Barnwell, "from African to spiritual to doo-wop to folk to jazz to civil-rights music - we have it all. " This year is the group's 40th anniversary. Since 1973, Sweet Honey - present lineup Barnwell, Louise Robinson, Aisha Kahlil, Nitanju Bolade Casel, Carol Maillard, and impassioned signer Shirley Childress Saxton - has crisscrossed the world, with song-and-dance performances that combine musical journey, dance, spoken-word, political statement, and ecstatic exploration of the human voice.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT SEEMED THAT just about anything Jennifer Barker undertook, she did exceptionally well. Selling houses, researching titles, painting, decorating, playing musical instruments by ear, kayaking . . . to name a few. She had such an eye for decorating that she turned her 300-year-old stone cottage in Flourtown and her home in Ventnor Heights, N.J., into showplaces. "If she came to visit you, she would try to redecorate your house," said longtime friend Fran Atkinson. And you might have fallen for her ideas.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Anthony Celano, 96, a music-shop owner who, as mayor of Hatboro from 1981 to 2005, married more than 2,000 couples, died Tuesday, Oct. 30, at Luther Woods Nursing & Rehabilitation Center in Hatboro. When Mr. Celano was elected mayor for the first time, he didn't belong to a political party, although he would become a Republican. After operating Hatboro Music Shop for 36 years, however, he knew everybody, he later told The Inquirer. Before the election, cars and vans drove around for weeks with unsolicited, homemade "Go With the Flow, Vote for Joe" signs.
NEWS
July 7, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a five-day gathering that drew about 200 members of the national Occupy movement to Philadelphia, the protesters left town Thursday for a seven-day trek to New York City. Despite temperatures in the 90s forecast for the next four days in New Jersey, about 45 people signed up to walk the entire 99-mile route from the Liberty Bell to Wall Street, according to Daphne Carr, a graduate student from New York City who organized the march. About 100 people began the march Thursday morning.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2012 | Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Human-shaped robots, reminiscent of Star Wars' C-3PO, may have been the celebrities at this week's Philly Robotics Expo at Drexel University. The Korean-made Hubo, a 4-foot-3-inch bot that can dance and play musical instruments , made a cameo. So did the Darwin-OP, Hubo's smaller cousin, which showed off the soccer skills crucial to competing in international RoboCup tournaments . But the real stars were the kids behind robots that were comparatively shapeless and lower-tech — students from places such as Philadelphia's Central, Girls, and George Washington High Schools, Hatboro-Horsham, and Pottstown, who came to Drexel on Monday to show what their homemade robots could do. Robotics teams haven't quite replaced football or basketball at schools in the area.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|