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Muslim Brotherhood

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NEWS
May 12, 2006 | By Inquirer foreign staffer Hannah Allam
Conspicuous by their presence at yesterday's demonstrations was the Muslim Brotherhood. It is a poweful but formally banned Islamic organization. It is also the largest opposition force in Egypt's parliament. Hamas, which now has gained political supremacy in the Palestinian territories, has used the Muslim Brotherhood as a historical model. The largest gathering yesterday included several hundred members of the Brotherhood. That protest ended with two senior Brotherhood figures in custody and several other members beaten and detained, according to witnesses.
NEWS
February 9, 2011
ILOVED the op-ed "Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Brotherhood?" by Sarah Salwen, who manages an entire article on the Muslim Brotherhood and its role in Egypt's future, yet somehow manages to avoid the subject of sharia law, the very root of the Brotherhood's ideology. Salwen also believes they want free and fair elections, an end to violence and a democratic process. Actually, they want none of this. The Brotherhood is the Taliban. The Brotherhood is al Qaeda. The Brotherhood is the cornerstone of a worldwide agenda to bring sharia to every part of the globe.
NEWS
December 1, 2011 | By Hamza Hendawi and Maggie Michael, ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO - Partial results Wednesday showed the Muslim Brotherhood emerging as the biggest winner in Egypt's landmark parliamentary elections, and leaders of the once-banned Islamic group demanded to form the next government, setting the stage for a possible confrontation with the ruling military. The generals who took power after the February fall of Hosni Mubarak have said they will name the government and the parliament would have no right to dissolve it. They have also sought to wrest from the new parliament the more long-reaching and crucial role of running the process for writing the new constitution.
NEWS
February 24, 2011 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
CAIRO - Could the Muslim Brotherhood take over after the Egyptian revolution? For years, Hosni Mubarak insisted his authoritarian regime was all that prevented an Islamist deluge. He used the Brotherhood bogeyman as an excuse to crush almost all political opposition, including liberals and leftists. He banned the Brotherhood but let it run candidates for parliament, thus giving the bogeyman more heft. The result: The Brotherhood (known as the Ikhwan ) is by far the best-organized political movement in the barren Egyptian political landscape.
NEWS
September 30, 1995 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With parliamentary elections nearing, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak has stirred controversy by ordering that dozens of potential candidates from the leading opposition movement, the Muslim Brotherhood, be put on trial in military rather than civil courts. Egyptians across the political spectrum, Christian as well as Muslim, have protested the trial of 49 members of the Brotherhood before a military tribunal that is to reconvene today. Until now, military courts had been reserved for suspected members of armed Islamic groups engaged in a violent campaign to topple the government.
NEWS
February 25, 2012 | By Aya Batrawy, Associated Press
CAIRO - One of Egypt's top presidential contenders demanded police protection Friday after masked men stopped his car on the way back from a campaign event, beat him with the butt of an automatic rifle, and stole his vehicle - an attack that many of his supporters fear may not have been random. A lawmaker from the country's most powerful political party, the Muslim Brotherhood, also was wounded in a hit-and-run Friday. The two events demonstrate the disintegration of security in the country since the uprising a year ago that toppled former president Hosni Mubarak.
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO - The top leader of Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood denounced peace efforts with Israel and urged holy war to liberate Palestinian territories on Thursday - one day after the country's president, who hails from the movement, mediated a cease-fire between Israelis and Palestinians to end eight days of fierce fighting. "The enemy knows nothing but the language of force," said Mohammed Badie. "Be aware of the game of grand deception with which they depict peace accords," he said in a statement carried on the group's website and emailed to reporters.
NEWS
July 19, 2012 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Republican Sen. John McCain on Wednesday strongly defended a longtime aide to Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton against unsubstantiated allegations that her family has ties to Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood, repudiating charges leveled by another Republican, Rep. Michele Bachmann. In a speech on the Senate floor, McCain praised the work and patriotism of Huma Abedin, a State Department employee who has been a constant presence at Clinton's side. Without mentioning Bachmann by name, McCain assailed the attacks on Abedin, a Muslim, as an example of ignorance and fear that defames the spirit of the nation.
NEWS
February 17, 2011
A FEW COMMENTS on the Feb. 3 edition: Kimberly Garrison is absolutely correct when she says that U.S. students are more interested in feeling good than working hard. Students are taught to have high self-esteem, instead of reading, writing, and arithmetic. Next, Sarah Salwen is in denial about the history of the Muslim Brotherhood and its aims. The Brotherhood was founded in Egypt in 1928 by Hassan el-Banna, a Wahhabist, the most violent form of Islam. He sees the Wahhabi concept of Islamic jihad as a key tool to rally support to further his agenda of pan-Islamic takeover.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Abigail Hauslohner and Sharaf al-Hourani, Washington Post
CAIRO - Egyptian authorities escalated their battle against ousted leader Mohammed Morsi and his supporters Friday, launching an investigation into espionage and murder allegations against him as millions took to the streets in rival demonstrations across the country. The allegations marked the state's first legal steps against Morsi, who has been held incommunicado since he was deposed as president earlier this month in a military coup. The steps were taken as the military supervised mass rallies in Cairo that it had called to back its "mandate" to confront violence and "terrorism" - terms that Morsi's supporters and rights groups interpreted as signaling an imminent crackdown.
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NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
If you were looking for an Egyptian who could help his country fulfill the lost promise of the Arab Spring - some day - you couldn't do better than Emad Shahin, an internationally renowned and liberal scholar who studies political Islam. So why was this mild-mannered academic sentenced to death in absentia Saturday in a Cairo court? The answer lays bare the misguided policies of Egypt's new autocratic government, led by President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, which is trying to muzzle all domestic critics in the name of fighting terrorism.
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
This week, Secretary of State John Kerry rightly criticized an Egyptian court's conviction of three international journalists with Al Jazeera English on blatantly fake charges cooked up for political reasons. But Kerry failed to mention the equally grim case of an idealistic young American held without trial for nearly a year in Cairo's horrendous jails. Mohamed Soltan was arrested in August for trying to document the Egyptian military's undemocratic crackdown on dissent after last summer's coup.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
As a wave of protests against government corruption and misrule rolls from country to country, nervous autocrats are using the same formula to crush dissent. From Russia, to Ukraine, to Venezuela, to Egypt, and beyond, there are copycat crackdowns: Arrest opposition leaders on absurd charges, hold show trials, beat - or sometimes shoot - protesters, and silence media that challenge the government's message. Then blame a foreign conspiracy for all that has gone wrong. This formula kept many dictators in power in the 20th century.
NEWS
February 3, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
For those who think the failures of the Arab Spring prove the Mideast is unsuited to democracy, Jordan's Marwan Muasher begs to differ. A scholar and statesman who's long been a voice for tolerance in the Arab world, Muasher argues - in his important new book, The Second Arab Awakening and the Battle for Pluralism - that it's too soon to judge the outcome of the Arab upheavals that began in 2011. He says: "The Arab world never operated in a culture of democracy, so you can't expect a transformational process in three years.
NEWS
January 27, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
This weekend marks the third anniversary of the Tahrir Square revolt in Egypt. It's hard to recall the incredible exhilaration of those days, which I witnessed firsthand: Facebook-savvy activists rallied millions to the square with calls to end police brutality and oust a military-backed dictator. In 36 months, the counterrevolution has come full circle. Several key leaders of the Jan. 25, 2011, protest, including the April 6 movement cofounder Ahmed Maher, have been sentenced to three years in jail - at hard labor.
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
CAIRO - It isn't easy being a senior lawyer for Egypt's deposed president, the Muslim Brotherhood's Mohammed Morsi. A respected jurist and former member of Egypt's upper house of parliament, Mohamad Tosson was clearly frustrated, as he talked to me over tea in a dim hotel lobby. He has been permitted to see Morsi only once since the military ousted and jailed him in July, after huge anti-Morsi protests. "His lawyers need to discuss the case with him, but they don't allow it," he told me. "They don't permit him family visits, or even to see his son. " "They" means the military.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
CAIRO - Nearly three years ago, in the heyday of the Arab Spring, Tahrir Square was adorned with banners of youths killed by security forces. Hawkers sold T-shirts imprinted with their faces. Those banners are long gone, and this year vendors are selling T-shirts emblazoned with the face of Gen. Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, the army leader who oversaw the July ouster of Egypt's first elected president, the Muslim Brotherhood's Mohamed Morsi. Sisi's mien is on posters and fancy chocolates, and - in a Photoshopped pic on the Internet - has even been strategically imprinted on a pair of men's briefs.
NEWS
December 9, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
CAIRO - There is something sadly appropriate about arriving in the Mideast on the weekend when the world is mourning Nelson Mandela. Mandela was a visionary who managed to reconcile a long-repressed black majority with the white minority that had ruled them. His name became synonymous with forgiveness, in this case of the new black rulers toward fearful whites. The absence of such visionary leaders is the reason the Arab Spring has turned out so badly. In Egypt, former President Mohammed Morsi won a historic election but was unable to transcend his roots in the secretive Muslim Brotherhood, which terrified more moderate Muslims and Christians.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Should America still be trying to promote democracy abroad - especially when its own is so dysfunctional? This question has been nagging at me since the Obama administration announced a partial freeze on military aid to Egypt last week. The aim: to (belatedly) display U.S. displeasure over the Egyptian military's bloody ouster of an elected president in July. (The aid will be restored if Egypt makes progress toward an "inclusive" elected government.) The cutoff was avidly pushed by both Republican and Democratic members of Congress (even as they were sliding toward a possible debt default)
NEWS
September 27, 2013
A RELIGIOUS minority is being persecuted, driven from their homes, robbed, raped, murdered. From all the faux Islamophobia hysteria, you'd think it was Muslims. It's Christians, under a death sentence in parts of the Muslim world. Not in every Muslim country, but in too many. The world remains remarkably, willfully blind and mute as the faithful of the world's largest religion are blown apart by followers of the world's second-largest religion. Precise Christian persecution "figures are hard to come by," says Kiri Kankhwende, spokesman for Christian Solidarity Worldwide, in the United Kingdom.
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