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NEWS
September 4, 2002 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia school officials will let a Muslim security guard at Olney High School leave campus briefly on Fridays to pray at a local mosque, ending a dispute that flared at one of the city's most diverse schools. Bernie Mattox, 34, had maintained that his civil rights were violated when a new principal in May revoked his permission to attend communal jumah prayers at a mosque off campus each Friday. The district had countered that Mattox, who also uses the Muslim name Abdul-Ahad Muhammad, often was unable to return to campus in time for dismissal around 3 p.m., a crucial time for security guards.
NEWS
August 28, 2000 | By Angela Valdez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It's a small piece of fabric, slightly translucent. But for Oumama Belkhayat, it is everything. It is a symbol of her faith, and of her struggle to show it. It is a catalyst for prejudice, she says, and makes her an object of discrimination. Belkhayat plans to wear the scarf, or khimar, in her classroom at St. Mary's Hall-Doane Academy in Burlington City, where next month she will become the first Muslim teacher at the 163-year-old school for kindergarten through 12th grade.
NEWS
November 3, 1996 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At a Catholic school, saying prayers during the day is pretty much the norm, but for Sumeyya Ashraf, 14, a freshman at Archbishop Prendergast Catholic High School in Drexel Hill, prayer time is when she slips away from class for a few private minutes. Sumeyya is a Muslim, and in keeping with the law of Islam, she prays five times a day. Since one of the prescribed times is around her lunch hour, Sumeyya practices her ritual of standing, kneeling and lying prostrate in the office of the school's president, Sister Catherine Robinson.
NEWS
September 23, 2005 | By Gaiutra Bahadur INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A suspended Philadelphia firefighter who sued the city for the right to wear his beard on the job lost his bid before a state judge yesterday. To Curtis DeVeaux, 25, the beard is his religious obligation as a Muslim. But to Common Pleas Court Judge James Murray, the facial hair constitutes a safety hazard. DeVeaux, of the Northeast, was suspended without pay on Feb. 2 after refusing to shave. The Fire Department bans beards, saying they interfere with the tight facial seal on masks that provide oxygen to firefighters and keep poisons out. DeVeaux sued under the Pennsylvania Religious Freedom Protection Act. Murray did not tackle the constitutionality of the law, which says that, unless a compelling interest can be shown, religious expression should be respected.
NEWS
June 2, 2005 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Common Pleas Court judge has stopped the city from firing a Muslim firefighter who cited religious obligations in refusing to shave off his beard. In a preliminary injunction issued last week, Judge Joseph A. Dych barred the city from either firing Curtis DeVeaux or cutting his pay during the course of litigation. The American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania brought the suit on DeVeaux's behalf after the city Fire Department suspended him without pay in February. Department officials argued that DeVeaux's beard, grown as a sign of Muslim faith, interfered with effective use of a respirator and, as a result, amounted to a safety hazard.
NEWS
July 27, 1999 | By Monica Rhor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Atiq Chaudhry did not know that he was creating the ultimate Philly fusion cuisine. He just thought that he was reacting like a good businessman. A few years ago, Chaudhry noticed that more and more of the customers at his Pizza Pak II hoagie shop were Muslim, and that more and more were requesting halal meat - meat slaughtered according to Islamic law. That is when Chaudhry, a Pakistani immigrant, came up with the idea of combining a local food favorite with a centuries-old Islamic tradition.
NEWS
December 4, 2002
RE SIGNE'S "Miss Muslim World" cartoon: To paint a group of people in such a manner, even though it was "probably" meant to be satirical, is an outrage. The interesting thing is that I would not have seen the cartoon if it was not shown to me by several garbed Muslim sisters of mine that hold master's degrees. To add to the myth that all Islamic cultures treat women as second-class citizens is an outright lie. You guys should apologize - then research and print a big human-interest story about the progressive Muslim population here in our city.
NEWS
August 14, 2008 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mother of murder victim Jereleigh Morton sobbed as she looked at the tiny woman in the Montgomery County courtroom yesterday, and begged her to apologize for killing her son. "I loved you," Delzora Morton said to her daughter-in-law, Myra Morton. "All you had to do was walk away like I told you so many times. You didn't have to take him away from me. "Can you say, 'Mom, I'm sorry?' Can you say it?" And for the first time, Myra Morton apologized for pumping two bullets into her husband as he slept in Whitpain Township on Aug. 5, 2007, the morning he was to fly to Morocco to meet and impregnate a woman he had taken as his second wife.
NEWS
February 2, 2009
FOR SOME MUSLIMS, these words from President Obama hold deep significance: "I have Muslim members of my family," Obama said last Monday in an interview with an Arab cable network. "I have lived in a Muslim country . . . the largest one, Indonesia. " The words hold a deep significance in this country, too: Before he was elected, it's obvious, Barack Obama could not have spoken them without risking serious negative political consequences. His campaign was on guard to refute suggestions that Obama, a Christian, was a secret follower of Islam.
NEWS
April 23, 1997
While fundamentalism is an expansive force within the Muslim world, it neither seeks a holy war with nor domination of the non-Muslim world. In this respect, it ought to matter no more to the non-Muslim world than Quebecois nationalism matters to Thailand. Islamic fundamentalism recognizes two realms: the community of believers - the umma - and the non-Islamic world.... Thus, the policies of the Iranian government toward Central Asia ... are not really "foreign" policies at all..
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