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Mussels

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1987 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
About this time of year, when all appears to have reached its bleakest, you begin looking for signs of new life. Such as a crocus cracking through the earth. Or a new restaurant. Bright, sunny and cheerful, filled with a spring-like promise of bounty. And guess what? I think I found one. It's called Alfio's. It's in Glenside, and it's only a month or so old. The place is named for Alfio Gaglianese, probably no stranger to many of the area's restaurant-goers. He was for nearly two decades the gracious and suave maitre d' of the DaVinci restaurant.
NEWS
August 9, 1996 | by Stan Hochman, Daily News Restaurant Reviewer
The 10 plump New Zealand mussels ($8.95) arrive on the half-shell, on a plate, not crammed into a bowl, face down in an earthy red sauce, their pale green shells a vivid contrast. If you didn't already realize that Joseph's was not your run-of-the-mill South Philadelphia Italian restaurant - by the art work on the walls, by the Diane Schuur tapes warbling in the background, by the black-and-white checkerboard floor, by the ambitious wine list - you know it now. "We took the old basic Italian food and made it up to date," chef/-owner Joseph Tucker says.
FOOD
November 28, 1999 | By Aliza Green, FOR THE INQUIRER
Many Philadelphians make a regular ritual of going out to restaurants for steamed mussels in red or in white sauce. We might not think of making steamed mussels at home, but they make a fast, flavorful meal that is low in cost and high in protein. Here are two versions that are quick and easy to make: Italian-inspired Mussels With Leeks, Saffron and Tomato, a lighter, sweet version of mussels in red sauce; and Belgian-style Mussels Steamed in Beer and enriched with mustard butter.
NEWS
July 5, 2006 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Millions of mussels, baking in the warm July air. Not a particularly good smell for beachgoers in search of a relaxing day at the Shore. But that was the predicament yesterday along the ocean from the last eight blocks of Atlantic City bordering Ventnor through parts of Margate - all because the shellfish had been washed ashore by turbulent seas from last week's storms. "We have millions of mussels on the beach right now," said Lt. Joseph Cincotta of the Margate City Beach Patrol, who described the odor as "somewhat of a garbage smell.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1996 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Conversation at our table was interrupted by a most wonderful aroma that could only come from a dish of mussels in white sauce. Soft nuances of wine and a distinctive bouquet of garlic seemed to be conducting their own dialogue. We hadn't ordered them. They were being brought to the next table where two young couples were obviously enjoying their Saturday night out at Vincent's Mansion House, a Gloucester City spot that has grown from local tavern to restaurant. I was told later that mussels ($4.50)
FOOD
March 12, 1995 | By Marie Simmons, FOR THE INQUIRER
Here's a seafood soup that's easy to make, versatile, elegant and delicious. If I were asked to select a few favorite recipes from over the years, this seafood soup would be my number-one choice. The soup base is simply sauteed onions and garlic with white wine, canned tomatoes and the natural juices from the poached seafood. Saffron, the orange- colored stigma of the crocus flower, best known for the color and aroma it imparts to the paella of Spain and the classic risotto alla Milanese of Northern Italy, adds an exotic taste to the tomato broth.
NEWS
March 7, 2004 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Chick's Tavern is the only eatery I know where a meal is not complete without a plastic bucket on the table. On my visit, the dull thuds of tossed mussel shells soon gave away to sharp clicks - sort of like the snapping sounds of castanets - as the bucket filled. At this third-generation family restaurant, mussels are served two ways: by themselves or heaped on a bed of linguine. Either way, they're served with red or white sauce and placed in a dish the size of a punch bowl.
FOOD
July 12, 2013
Mussels With Ravigote Sauce . . . 3 Japanese Mayo Chocolate Mousse . . . 2 Kaleslaw . . . 4 Almond and Kale Smoothie . . . 4 Morning Glory Kale Muffins . . . 4
FOOD
July 12, 2013 | By Bonnie S. Benwick, Washington Post
"A refreshing way to eat mussels on a hot day" is how author Caroline Conran describes this dish, served at L'Estagnol restaurant in France's Languedoc-Roussillon region. Mussels With Ravigote Sauce 2 or 3 servings 2 pounds fresh mussels 1 large shallot plus 1 or 2 medium shallots Generous 1 cup dry white wine 2 or 3 cornichons 2 tablespoons capers Leaves of 2 sprigs tarragon, 1 stem flat-leaf parsley 4 to 6 chives 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 3 tablespoons creme fraiche 3 tablespoons olive oil Kosher salt Fresh ground black pepper 1. Place serving plates and a rimmed baking sheet in the refrigerator.
FOOD
July 29, 2010 | By Linda Gassenheimer, McClatchy Newspapers
Mussels in a light cream sauce brings back memories of eating on the terrace of a small restaurant in Normandy, breathing the fresh sea air and drinking a chilled glass of white wine. Recreate it with this easy-to-prepare, delicious dinner. Adding a small amount of cream to this dish brings out the flavor of the mussels and vegetables. The commercially raised mussels available today are cleaner than they used to be. Just wash them in cold water before using. Scrape off the beard or thin hairs along the shell.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beyond some rocks, to the side of a riffle, in the knee-deep water of Tacony Creek, community watershed specialist Alex Cooper leaned over, dug around in the bottom, and planted a freshwater mussel. It was an act of optimism. Freshwater mussels - which, unlike their saltwater brethren, are inedible - are a definitive sign of a healthy stream. But more than indicators, they're enablers, each filtering about 10 gallons of water a day. In 1919, when the zoologist Arnold Edward Ortmann surveyed Pennsylvania streams for mussels, many species were plentiful.
FOOD
July 12, 2013 | By Bonnie S. Benwick, Washington Post
"A refreshing way to eat mussels on a hot day" is how author Caroline Conran describes this dish, served at L'Estagnol restaurant in France's Languedoc-Roussillon region. Mussels With Ravigote Sauce 2 or 3 servings 2 pounds fresh mussels 1 large shallot plus 1 or 2 medium shallots Generous 1 cup dry white wine 2 or 3 cornichons 2 tablespoons capers Leaves of 2 sprigs tarragon, 1 stem flat-leaf parsley 4 to 6 chives 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 3 tablespoons creme fraiche 3 tablespoons olive oil Kosher salt Fresh ground black pepper 1. Place serving plates and a rimmed baking sheet in the refrigerator.
FOOD
July 12, 2013
Mussels With Ravigote Sauce . . . 3 Japanese Mayo Chocolate Mousse . . . 2 Kaleslaw . . . 4 Almond and Kale Smoothie . . . 4 Morning Glory Kale Muffins . . . 4
FOOD
January 10, 2013
The Original Clam Tavern is a throwback in the best sense, an old-school seafood standby that's stayed true to blue-collar Clifton Heights for 50 years, both in fair prices and low-frills, fishtank ambiance. Its greatest asset is owner Tony Blanche, a childhood clam-shucker there who returned to buy it after a career in sales, who understands the value of quality ingredients treated with pride in continuity. You taste that in the peerlessly fresh mussels red, the creamy chowder, plump scampi and excellent crab cakes.
FOOD
October 18, 2012
Makes 4 servings 5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided 6 cloves garlic, 2 minced and 4 thinly sliced 1 small yellow onion, thinly sliced Kosher salt 3/4 teaspoon smoked sweet paprika 1 cup seeded and diced fresh tomato or one 14 1/2-ounce can diced tomatoes, drained 1 cup dry white wine 6 ounces Spanish-style chorizo, cut into 3/8-inch pieces (1 1/4 cups) 3 sprigs fresh thyme 4 pounds mussels, scrubbed and debearded 1 baguette, cut on the diagonal into 1/2-inch slices Freshly ground black pepper 1. Combine 3 tablespoons of the olive oil and the minced garlic in a small bowl and set aside.
NEWS
August 13, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
SOUTH AMBOY, N.J. - In the distance loomed the huge metal tanks storing oil and gasoline near the water's edge. But right on the shoreline of the Raritan Bay, amid the deep-green sea lettuce washing up in the waves, there were bait fish, clams, mussels, and shrimp, with shorebirds swooping down low in search of a meal. The Raritan and Delaware Bays are home to heavy petrochemical operations, with the potential for great environmental damage in the event of a spill. Because of that, a group of volunteers is fanning out along the coast of some of the state's industrialized waterways to document the fish, plants, and animals there now. The data being collected by the American Littoral Society of Sandy Hook will help form a starting point to compare with the aftermath of a spill.
TRAVEL
December 4, 2011 | By Myscha Theriault, McClatchy Newspapers
Known for its chocolate, waffles, and beer as well as its lace and in-season mussels, Belgium brings a wealth of old-world charm to the European tour experience. Those who fear it's out of financial reach should be pleasantly surprised to learn just how affordable the country can be for the budget traveler. Follow these thrifty travel tips for an affordable Belgian vacation. Transportation. John Wetmore, a television producer for Pedestrians.org - an awareness organization focused on the unique issues of walkers and bikers - points to the public bicycle access system known as Villo, for cheap transport in Brussels.
NEWS
January 17, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
If not for the heat of a summer day, one of the major biological finds in the Delaware River in recent years might not have occurred. It was June, and researchers were scouring the banks and shallows of the river between Trenton and Philadelphia for evidence of freshwater mussels, important water-filtering organisms that are becoming increasingly hard to find in the region's streams. Danielle Kreeger, science director of the nonprofit Partnership for the Delaware Estuary, had spotted shells along the banks during a wetlands project, and she wanted to see if live mussels were in the river nearby.
FOOD
July 29, 2010 | By Linda Gassenheimer, McClatchy Newspapers
Mussels in a light cream sauce brings back memories of eating on the terrace of a small restaurant in Normandy, breathing the fresh sea air and drinking a chilled glass of white wine. Recreate it with this easy-to-prepare, delicious dinner. Adding a small amount of cream to this dish brings out the flavor of the mussels and vegetables. The commercially raised mussels available today are cleaner than they used to be. Just wash them in cold water before using. Scrape off the beard or thin hairs along the shell.
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