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FOOD
April 25, 2013
Makes 5 servings 10 bone-in chicken             thighs and    drumsticks, skin          removed ½ cup Dijon mustard 1 clove garlic, minced ¼ cup maple syrup ¼ teaspoon oregano 1.    Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Rinse the chicken and pat dry with paper towels. 2.    Combine the mustard, garlic, maple syrup, and oregano in a small bowl. 3.    Spread the mustard mixture evenly on top of each chicken thigh or drumstick, being careful to cover as much of the surface as possible to form a crust.
FOOD
June 29, 1988 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
Mustard, the teeny seed that packs a big wallop, is not only an effortless way to spark flavor in food but one of the easiest condiments to prepare from scratch at home. Though it has been cultivated since prehistoric times, mustard has never really required cultivation, since it is a weed that grows wild in practically every region of the world. There are three types of mustard seed. Black mustard is the most pungent, followed by brown mustard (sometimes called Indian mustard)
FOOD
September 20, 2012
Prepared mustards range widely in texture, color, and flavor because mustard-makers have long sought to put their own unique spin on the product. Producers choose the mustard seed - white, brown, black - and determine how finely the seeds will be ground or crushed. For some, the choice is governed by personal taste or commercial appeal. For others, the seed is determined as a matter of law. To make prepared mustards, the ground seeds are mixed with a liquid - often water, white wine, beer, or vinegar - to form a paste.
FOOD
July 26, 1995 | by Phyllis Stein-Novack, Special to the Daily News
I recently rummaged through my refrigerator and found several jars of mustard, none of which taste like the bright yellow stuff my mother slathered on my grilled cheese sandwiches. Nestled next to the hot sauce and a bottle of horseradish were two jars of French Dijon mustard - one smooth, one whole- grain - a spicy brown Polish-style mustard from Chicago, and a fiery Creole mustard made in Philadelphia. Dijon, the capital of Burgundy, is also the mustard capital of the world: Mention Dijon, and many folks automatically think mustard.
NEWS
December 21, 1999 | BY NICK DISPOLDO
I suppose I'm like many people in that I'm a sap for the syrupy sentimentality of the Christmas season. Just let me hear any carol, Crosby singing Irving Berlin's "White Christmas" or even Jimmy Boyd's "I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus" - and I'm numb with nostalgia. I can vividly recall my most memorable Christmas. Born in South Philadelphia, I was raised by my maternal grandparents in their old brownstone home on the 2600 block of Hutchinson Street between 9th and 10th streets.
FOOD
July 10, 1988 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
Ketchup is the condiment that covers the Earth these days, but it was not always so. From prehistory until the turn of this century, or possibly a bit later, mustard was the universal ready-made relish. The very earliest users didn't actually make mustard, they simply popped in a few seeds and chewed them along with their meat, thus seasoning as they ate. But by Roman times, cooks were soaking ground seeds in barely fermented grape juice to make a product that would be recognized today, and our word mustard comes from their term mustum ardens (burning wine)
FOOD
July 2, 1986 | By Joyce Gemperlein, Inquirer Staff Writer
A customer at a gourmet cheese shop in the Washington area had looked in vain for weeks for a particular mustard to which she had become addicted. But it was nowhere to be found. Asked why the mustard, an intriguingly creamy, hot and sweet champagne mustard, was so hard to find, the shop owner told the customer: "It is made by two little ladies in some tiny town in Pennsylvania, and they are so old that their production is limited. " Diantha Nason and her partner, Tony Spallone, think that is a charming and funny tale.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2002 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For about a year, the people who knead people in the Spa at the Four Seasons Hotel have not been the luckiest people in the world. They were trying to put together a new massage themed directly to the city, a Philadelphia pretzel massage. They could twist you OK, but they couldn't find anything appropriate to rub all over you. They couldn't get the mustard to work right. Well, they took a different path - or in Philly, maybe a cobblestone alley - and on Oct. 28, the Four Seasons will roll out rubs linked, you might say loosely, to Philadelphia.
FOOD
August 5, 2016
Makes 4 servings 1/4 cup olive oil 1/2 cup water 7 tablespoons fresh lime juice (from 3 or 4 limes) 1 clove garlic 1/4 packed cup coarsely chopped cilantro leaves and upper parts of stems, plus 1 tablespoon for optional garnish 1 packed tablespoon fresh dill, coarsely chopped, plus 1 teaspoon for optional garnish Flesh of 1 large, ripe avocado, cut into chunks 11/4 teaspoons kosher or sea salt 1/4 teaspoon freshly...
FOOD
February 23, 2000 | Daily News research/National Hot Dog and Sausage Council
Here's how we like our dogs, from coast to coast: East: Consumes more all-beef hot dogs than any other region. South: Second to the West in its consumption of poultry dogs. Many local varieties are piled with vegetables ("dragged through the garden") and topped with cole slaw. Midwest: Consumes more pork-and-beef franks. West: Consumes more poultry dogs than any other region. TOPPED DOGS Berkeley - Lettuce and tomatoes. Chicago - Onions, mustard, dark green relish, kosher pickle, tomatoes, peppers, celery salt on a poppyseed bun. Detroit - Meat sauce.
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FOOD
August 5, 2016
Makes 4 servings 1/4 cup olive oil 1/2 cup water 7 tablespoons fresh lime juice (from 3 or 4 limes) 1 clove garlic 1/4 packed cup coarsely chopped cilantro leaves and upper parts of stems, plus 1 tablespoon for optional garnish 1 packed tablespoon fresh dill, coarsely chopped, plus 1 teaspoon for optional garnish Flesh of 1 large, ripe avocado, cut into chunks 11/4 teaspoons kosher or sea salt 1/4 teaspoon freshly...
FOOD
February 26, 2016
Makes 2-4 servings 1/2 pound sunchokes 1/2 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice Kosher salt 1 large leek 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 2 ounces bacon, finely diced 1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves 1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme leaves 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1 large egg, beaten 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 4 poached eggs 1. Peel the sunchokes and cut them into...
NEWS
July 12, 2013
THIS RECIPE by Ganesh Selvakumar, of Broomall, was the winning selection for Pennsylvania in the 2013 Healthy Lunchtime Challenge. LENTIL-SPINACH SOUP AND MINT CHUTNEY 1/2 cup dried, split chickpeas 1 teaspoon olive oil 2 cups packed fresh mint leaves 1 cup chopped onion 2 fresh green chilies, seeded and thinly sliced 1 clove garlic, minced 1 teaspoon tamarind paste 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup water ...
FOOD
June 27, 2013
Star spangled serveware Dish out your favorite patriotic treats on the Fourth of July with this star-shaped two-tiered stand. Made of galvanized metal, it works on the picnic table as well as in the dining room. Use it to serve ice cream sundae toppings or summer snacks and hors d'oeuvres. In honor of Independence Day, pledge your allegience to a patriotic table with this festive stand. - Michelle Dembo Galvanized metal star stand, $69, at Pottery Barn stores or online at potterybarn.com.
FOOD
June 20, 2013
I've long resisted participating in celebrity special dishes because I knew it could get weird. And sure enough, it was awkward to hear my name recited as a June special at American Sardine Bar, as in, "we're featuring the Craig LaBan 2-on-1," and, "You want a Craig LaBan?" I agreed in this case because few local chefs relate to my deep craving for a true Detroit Coney chili dog like Scott Schroeder, a fellow native Detroiter. And he went straight to the heart of the task, literally, by doctoring up genuine National Coney chili sauce (beanless, with subtle Greek spice)
FOOD
April 25, 2013
Makes 5 servings 10 bone-in chicken             thighs and    drumsticks, skin          removed ½ cup Dijon mustard 1 clove garlic, minced ¼ cup maple syrup ¼ teaspoon oregano 1.    Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Rinse the chicken and pat dry with paper towels. 2.    Combine the mustard, garlic, maple syrup, and oregano in a small bowl. 3.    Spread the mustard mixture evenly on top of each chicken thigh or drumstick, being careful to cover as much of the surface as possible to form a crust.
FOOD
September 21, 2012 | By Bill Daley, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
Walk the mustard aisle of any store, and "D" will stand for Dijon, a testament, perhaps, to the popularity of all those Grey Poupon commercials. But "D" also means Düsseldorf, an oft-overlooked style that has multiple culinary uses beyond garnishing a hot dog. "Düsseldorf has much better flavor than Dijon," says chef Walter Staib of Philadelphia's City Tavern restaurant. "But it doesn't have the sex appeal of Dijon, or the pedigree. " "I cook with mustard all the time. The Düsseldorf has more flavor," adds Staib, host of the public television series A Taste of History.
FOOD
September 20, 2012
Prepared mustards range widely in texture, color, and flavor because mustard-makers have long sought to put their own unique spin on the product. Producers choose the mustard seed - white, brown, black - and determine how finely the seeds will be ground or crushed. For some, the choice is governed by personal taste or commercial appeal. For others, the seed is determined as a matter of law. To make prepared mustards, the ground seeds are mixed with a liquid - often water, white wine, beer, or vinegar - to form a paste.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012 | Joyce Gemperlein
2 ripe avocados 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice Scant ½ teaspoon fine-grain sea salt (don't heap this) ½ cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro 1 tablespoon clarified butter or extra-virgin coconut oil 1 teaspoon black or brown mustard seeds 1 small yellow onion, minced 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1 teaspoon Indian curry powder 1 small serrano chile, minced     1. Cut each avocado in half, remove the...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1½ tablespoons peeled and grated fresh ginger 1½ tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon brown sugar ½ cup pure olive oil   1. Whisk together all ingredients in small bowl or put ingredients in a covered jar and shake until the sugar dissolves.   From Solo Suppers by Joyce Goldstein (2003)   Note: Trader Joe's Sesame Soy Ginger Vinaigrette may be used as a substitute. Per three-tablespoon serving:   247 calories, trace protein, 1 gram carbohydrates, 1 gram sugar, 27 grams fat, no cholesterol, 46 milligrams sodium, no dietary fiber.
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