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Mustard Gas

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NEWS
June 10, 2010
NEW BEDFORD, Mass. - Crews have begun decontaminating an Atlantic City-based clam boat that was isolated off New Bedford after it pulled up munitions shells tainted with mustard gas. Coast Guard Chief Petty Officer Jeff Hall said officials hoped the ESS Pursuit would be free to leave by Thursday. He said cleanup crews were relying heavily on bleach, which dilutes the mustard gas, and elbow grease. The crew pulled up two shells with its catch Sunday off Long Island. The next day, crewman Konstantin Burndshov was hospitalized with blisters from the gas exposure.
NEWS
April 16, 1992 | By Mark Thompson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In testimony smoldering with betrayal, a sad procession of veterans told a government panel yesterday of the pain they had endured since the Navy lured them into secret mustard gas tests during World War II. "The Germans put Jews in the gas chamber," said Johnnie H. Ross of Robersonville, N.C. "The United States put their men in the gas chamber. " About two dozen men in their 60s and 70s testified before a medical board of the National Academy of Sciences, which is trying to determine what maladies the tests might have caused.
NEWS
May 1, 1986
An April 4 editorial on federal fines against Union Carbide Corp. erroneously characterized phosgene, one of the chemicals involved in the case. Although phosgene is a poisonous gas with military applications, it is neither mustard gas, whose lethalness is much more potent and prolonged, nor a nerve gas, which affects the body in completely different ways.
NEWS
January 23, 1991 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Journalists in Saudi Arabia, reporting live for network television, grab gas masks as the air raid sirens whine. Civilians in Israel sling gas masks over their shoulders as they go off to work or the market. But are the gas masks enough protection if Iraq should resort to chemical warfare? Not necessarily. It would depend on whether Iraq would be spewing the air with nerve gas or with mustard gas. And there's no way of telling - until it's too late. "Nerve gas can be absorbed through the skin or the respiratory tract.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | Daily News wire services
WASHINGTON VA EXPANDS AID FOR GAS VICTIMS About 4,000 veterans who were subjected to secret mustard gas tests during World War II may now be eligible for compensation, the Department of Veterans Affairs said yesterday. The VA said it had expanded the list of recognized long-term effects of significant exposure to mustard gas. The decision followed a $600,000 VA- funded study. Among the new health conditions to be recognized as linked to mustard gas exposure are respiratory cancers, skin cancers, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and leukemia.
NEWS
June 29, 2006
BILL O'BRIEN'S letter ("FEMA spree," June 22) is puzzling. Who are these people who "float through life on the government's tab"? Is he referring to Haliburton and its subsidiaries? Is Mr. O'Brien equally upset that Haliburton has been fined and paid the government back for hundreds of millions in overcharges and fake meals, which Haliburton never fed the soldiers in Iraq? Was Mr. O'Brien upset when Haliburton was selling gas to the military in Iraq years ago for $3 a gallon that the company paid 25 cents a gallon for?
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | By Susan Bennett, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Bush administration promised yesterday to make "vigorous efforts" to stop Libya from producing and stockpiling poison gas and lethal nerve agents, and said it would not rule out any means to accomplish that end, including the use of force. White House press secretary Marlin Fitzwater called for "vigorous efforts to stop the (alleged Libyan) operation," although he refused to say what those efforts might involve. He would not rule out the option of a U.S. military strike against the Libyan plant at Rabta, where the poison gas is allegedly produced.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | By Mark Thompson and Jim Detjen, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A scientific panel affirmed yesterday that the government conducted secret gas-chamber tests on thousands of soldiers during World War II and said the experiments caused far more devastating illnesses in later years than previously believed. The panel, commissioned by the Department of Veterans Affairs, reaffirmed and broadened the government's earlier grudging admission that mustard gas was tested on servicemen in this country during the 1940s - something military officials had kept secret until 1991.
NEWS
June 26, 2011
Boston student hurt in lab blast BOSTON - A Boston College doctoral student suffered minor injuries at a lab Saturday when a chemical used in making mustard gas and methamphetamine exploded in her hand, a school spokesman said. The student, who was not identified, suffered cuts on her face after the small blast at the Merkert Chemistry Center in Boston, said school spokesman Jack Dunn. The student told emergency workers that she had been using thionyl chloride, which can be used to make mustard gas and nerve toxins, but it is also used in the manufacturing of batteries and herbicides, among other things.
NEWS
August 27, 1988 | By Michael Reisman
On Aug. 1 an independent team of experts appointed by the United Nations issued a report condemning Iraq for using chemical bombs containing mustard gas and other substances against Iran. Utilization was "repeated" and had "become more intense and frequent. " The team found evidence of relatively minor injuries caused by mustard gas in Iraq, but did not endorse Iraqi allegations that they were the result of Iranian actions. Because the United Nations is also expected to perform mediation and conciliation functions, its fact-finding commissions are cautious about condemning a member state.
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NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
As Congress debates whether or not America should launch missile strikes on Syria, one question dwarfs all others: Would we be worse off by not acting than by acting? President Obama has boxed himself and the country into a situation where either choice is a bad one. His declared reason for a military strike - to deter and degrade Bashar al-Assad's ability to use chemical weapons - is insufficient. But his foreign policy credibility would be shattered if the international drama he's triggered with his red lines ends up with ... nothing.
NEWS
June 26, 2011
Boston student hurt in lab blast BOSTON - A Boston College doctoral student suffered minor injuries at a lab Saturday when a chemical used in making mustard gas and methamphetamine exploded in her hand, a school spokesman said. The student, who was not identified, suffered cuts on her face after the small blast at the Merkert Chemistry Center in Boston, said school spokesman Jack Dunn. The student told emergency workers that she had been using thionyl chloride, which can be used to make mustard gas and nerve toxins, but it is also used in the manufacturing of batteries and herbicides, among other things.
NEWS
June 10, 2010
NEW BEDFORD, Mass. - Crews have begun decontaminating an Atlantic City-based clam boat that was isolated off New Bedford after it pulled up munitions shells tainted with mustard gas. Coast Guard Chief Petty Officer Jeff Hall said officials hoped the ESS Pursuit would be free to leave by Thursday. He said cleanup crews were relying heavily on bleach, which dilutes the mustard gas, and elbow grease. The crew pulled up two shells with its catch Sunday off Long Island. The next day, crewman Konstantin Burndshov was hospitalized with blisters from the gas exposure.
NEWS
June 29, 2006
BILL O'BRIEN'S letter ("FEMA spree," June 22) is puzzling. Who are these people who "float through life on the government's tab"? Is he referring to Haliburton and its subsidiaries? Is Mr. O'Brien equally upset that Haliburton has been fined and paid the government back for hundreds of millions in overcharges and fake meals, which Haliburton never fed the soldiers in Iraq? Was Mr. O'Brien upset when Haliburton was selling gas to the military in Iraq years ago for $3 a gallon that the company paid 25 cents a gallon for?
NEWS
June 20, 2004
A poll of Americans taken in March of this year found that 57 percent of those polled believed that Iraq under Saddam Hussein substantially supported al-Qaeda or was directly involved in the Sept. 11 attacks. Where did they get that misguided idea? Why, it was from their president, their vice president, their defense secretary, their national security adviser and other key players in the war on terror, of course. Through assertion, implication and innuendo, the Bush administration - backed by an amen chorus of talk-show babblers and oped writers who filled in the blanks that White House rhetoric artfully left - has labored to plant the notion that invading Iraq was a logical, urgent response to Sept.
NEWS
April 27, 2003 | By John Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. soldiers found 14 barrels of chemicals yesterday in a vast weapons storage area in north-central Iraq, and three initial tests indicated that they contained a deadly mixture of cyclosarin nerve agent and mustard gas. Previous finds of suspect chemicals in Iraq have turned out to be false alarms, and a Pentagon spokeswoman said yesterday that defense officials had no conclusive evidence that the barrels contained chemical weapons. She said samples from the barrels would be sent to the Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Maryland for further testing, a process that could take a week or longer.
NEWS
February 13, 2003 | By Trudy Rubin
If crimes against humanity were sufficient reason to oust Saddam, you could find all the necessary evidence in this shabby town. Set in a beautiful valley, with fields of wheat ringed by craggy, snow-topped mountains, Halabja has a history of horror. It is symbolized by a memorial statue in the middle of the town, much of which still lies in ruins. The statue portrays a dying father lying on the ground as he tries in vain to protect his child from an attack by chemical weapons.
NEWS
April 30, 2000 | By Linda K. Harris, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What does it feel like to be 100 years old? "Just like it does to be 99," said a smiling Grace Monteith, her hands folded firmly across the pocketbook in her lap. "I don't feel any older, unless I'm trying to get in and out of a car. " Monteith, who will celebrate her 101st birthday in July, was the guest of honor yesterday at the National Park Service's annual gathering of volunteers, held at Gloria Dei (Old Swedes') Church on Columbus Boulevard. She has devoted as many as 2,000 hours of volunteer service to the Deshler Morris House in Germantown and may be the country's oldest volunteer, said Stephen Sitarski, VIP coordinator for the Park Service.
NEWS
March 7, 1997 | By Thomas H. Matthews, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
There was a time when Daniel Duffy might have broken into a jig, or maybe even a reel, to celebrate the passing of another year. But for him, the time for Irish step dancing has passed. Instead, Duffy, a World War I veteran, sat and listened yesterday while well-wishers and a band honored him for reaching the age of 105. Duffy, dressed in gray pants and a white V-neck sweater, was feted in the activity room of the Veterans Administration's nursing home. Students from Caln Elementary School presented him with gifts, including candy and a shamrock wreath.
NEWS
May 28, 1994 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For Haddon Heights, this Memorial Day weekend will mark the passing of an era with funeral services for James J. Traynor, the last World War I veteran at the local Veterans of Foreign Wars post. Mr. Traynor, 98, who survived the trenches and mustard gas and the Argonne offensive of 1918, died Tuesday at Harvest Village in Atco, where he had lived for several years. He had resided in Haddon Heights for 61 years. "Everybody in Haddon Heights knew him, and he was Mr. Haddon Heights to some," said Bob Simmington, a lifelong friend and a World War II veteran.
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